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Old 09-08-2011, 09:00 PM   #21
skagneti
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how much malted milk...I made a muntons light beer kit for the folks who come over who don't like my other "real" beers, but would be happy to have a few gallons of this around for the same purpose.

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Old 09-08-2011, 09:42 PM   #22
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you can use 2 small cans of the liquid malted, or 1 container of powdered malted milk. since malted milk powder contains sugar make sure you cut back to about 2 1/2 pounds of sugar.

i would suggest red mill wheat bran. cheap and organic and you will only use half.

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Old 09-08-2011, 09:52 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlg5039 View Post
Sorry bit I dissagree. This "process" is off a bit. Aside from making sugar water and fermenting it, I think its nothing like making beer. I'd rather see a beginner making a prehopped Cooper's kit in a Mr. Beer.
You must mix and boil all ingredients. like the EXTRACTS in a beer kit. you must mix and cool in a primary, with a fermentation lock. UNLIKE the lockless mr. beer. You must add yeast and allow to settle. Like an EXTRACT kit. and you must fement, clarify (unlike mr. beer ), condition, and if you use wyeast 3068, you can age it for as long as you want. I fail to see how this can be trivialize to making sugar wine. Go hate on someone else. I'm not pretending to do anything beyond what I've said. This is Bush Beer. Beer you make from what you can get in the house or at the grocery store. Not everyone has the expendable income for All-Grain equipment. That doesn't mean they cannot enjoy home brewing, and that's what this is home brewing all the same. I don't need to order in ingredients to enjoy a home brew.

What does it matter?
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:22 PM   #24
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So far, the OP has been quite mature and respectful in his posting. Let's respond in kind and keep this thread on topic and helpful rather than judgmental.

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Old 09-08-2011, 10:26 PM   #25
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OK then, so what does this taste like?

How long does it typically take to clear up with bakers yeast?

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Old 09-08-2011, 10:28 PM   #26
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Also, could you elaborate a little on bottling with raisins?

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Old 09-08-2011, 10:39 PM   #27
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Surprising, bakers yeast gets bad rep in terms of taste and clarification. YES, finer yeasts are called fine for the reason but in this brew it doesn't really come into effect. Since it is ready fast with little aging the beer doesn't have time to develop wild skunky notes of wet cardboard, etc. Also, when the bonfire stage is complete and i siphon my beer into my secondary i disperse 1 tsp of clear, flavorless, gelatin over the surface and allow it to settle out much of the murkiness. After conditioning for about a week and a day or 2 in the fridge it is surprising, if not perfectly clear. As for the raisins. I place them in with my priming solution. Using a pairing knife to slice a raisin, not in half but just scoring, i drop 2 in each bottle. They lend little to no flavor until the bottom, but they make great gas nodes when the bottle is cracked. they really help "open it up"

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Old 09-09-2011, 12:07 AM   #28
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OP- Thank you so much for this contribution. I bet you could have guessed the chances of a poor reception with all the snobs around these parts!

I would love to try this out. $8 for what could be a drinkable beer? Why the hell would you not try this out? Even if it fails miserably it would be a REALLY fun experience. You made no pretenses that this produces a world class beer so I don't understand all the hate! It is very enjoyable to do something that is completely against the norm. I like how some of the same people attacking you were the same people that participated in the "Making beer from grocery store only ingredients" competition a year or two ago.

Plus if this works out, it would be a great "Post apocalyptic/zombie infestation" beer recipe

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Old 09-09-2011, 12:20 AM   #29
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The thing that's really throwing me off here is themilk powder.

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Old 09-09-2011, 12:23 AM   #30
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Quote:
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The thing that's really throwing me off here is themilk powder.
It has been used before in brewing...not often, but it isn't a new concept. Try brewing up a malted milk stout for the winter. It is incredible!
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