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Old 11-18-2010, 02:43 AM   #1
jourelemode
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Default 4.5 oz of priming sugar enough for a belgian quad/strong dark ale?

hey guys, is that enough priming sugar for this style of beer? Or do you think I should add more?

thanks

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Old 11-18-2010, 02:46 AM   #2
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In one gallon? Five? Ten?

Use a priming calculator and see what it takes to prime to style.

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Old 11-18-2010, 03:07 AM   #3
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In one gallon? Five? Ten?

Use a priming calculator and see what it takes to prime to style.
oh sorry, forgot to mention that, 5 gallons
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Old 11-18-2010, 03:24 AM   #4
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Those types of beers are typically of higher carbonation. 1.9 - 2.4 volumes. Assuming 2.4 volumes, 5 gallons of beer would need 4.2 oz corn sugar, or 3.99 oz table sugar.

So, though it would be a little out of style with 4.5 oz, I don't think anyone could tell the difference. It would put you a little over 2.5 volumes, which is what I shoot for for most of my ales.

Use this when in doubt:
http://kotmf.com/tools/prime.php

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Old 11-18-2010, 03:36 AM   #5
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Those types of beers are typically of higher carbonation. 1.9 - 2.4 volumes. Assuming 2.4 volumes, 5 gallons of beer would need 4.2 oz corn sugar, or 3.99 oz table sugar.

So, though it would be a little out of style with 4.5 oz, I don't think anyone could tell the difference. It would put you a little over 2.5 volumes, which is what I shoot for for most of my ales.

Use this when in doubt:
http://kotmf.com/tools/prime.php
i like mine a bit carbonated. so I guess the 4.5oz would be good. I was even thinking of adding more but I better not.

Question...the chimay blue, that one seems pretty high carbonation to me, do you think that one follows the style in terms of carbonation?
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Old 11-18-2010, 03:49 AM   #6
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It's hard to say. Might be interesting to research that. I don't know if their website gives any information. That seems to be about the only criticism I've read on it... that the carbonation was maybe too high.

I know temperature play a HUGE part of how carbonated a beer seems (as well as flavor). Most Ales are to be served at cellar temps, not straight from the refrigerator as we do so often in the States. The CO2 releases quicker at warmer temperatures, therefore will produce a bigger head, or gush as opposed to the same beer served too cold. This also releases more subtle flavors that may not be present when colder.

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Old 11-18-2010, 04:00 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by jollytim View Post
It's hard to say. Might be interesting to research that. I don't know if their website gives any information. That seems to be about the only criticism I've read on it... that the carbonation was maybe too high.

I know temperature play a HUGE part of how carbonated a beer seems (as well as flavor). Most Ales are to be served at cellar temps, not straight from the refrigerator as we do so often in the States. The CO2 releases quicker at warmer temperatures, therefore will produce a bigger head, or gush as opposed to the same beer served too cold. This also releases more subtle flavors that may not be present when colder.
yep, they are definitely better if you let them sit a while at room temps...

hopefully someone can give more insight on this...i don't want a flat tasting westy...
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Old 11-18-2010, 04:16 AM   #8
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just don't confuse cellar temps with room temps (unless you live where it's really cold...)

Typically cellar temps =roughly 55 to 58 F.
Room temp can range a bit, but is usually considered 70 to 75 F. (at least by me)

I love Ales served at cellar temp, not so much at room temp.

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Old 11-18-2010, 05:04 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jollytim View Post
just don't confuse cellar temps with room temps (unless you live where it's really cold...)

Typically cellar temps =roughly 55 to 58 F.
Room temp can range a bit, but is usually considered 70 to 75 F. (at least by me)

I love Ales served at cellar temp, not so much at room temp.
haha, yeah that's what I meant...out of the fridge, let it warm up a bit in room temperature before enjoying
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Old 11-18-2010, 12:33 PM   #10
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3+ volumes is more typical for a BSDA, especially a trappist.

I don't know where 1.9-2.4 come from, but most american ales are 2.4-2.6, I'm not drinking a lot of BDSA less carbonated than that.

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