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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > 3rd batch yesterday; "yummy bock"
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Old 03-01-2009, 04:07 PM   #1
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Default 3rd batch yesterday; "yummy bock"

Yesterday I brewed my 3rd batch; a so called "yummy bock" that I got from the LHB.

To start, the ingrediants:

7lbs Light Malt Extract Syrup
16oz German Munich Malt Grain
12oz German CaraMunich III Malt Grain
2oz German Carafa Black Malt Grain
2oz Noble bittering hops
1lb Light Dry Malt Extract
11.5gm Salfager s-23 Dry Lager Yeast.


Now, my first question. This being the only local brewery nearby, how do these ingrediants sound? Should there be more of one, or less of another ingrediant?

My OG was right at 1.060 (given range should have been 1.056 to 1.060).

Wort was about 72 degrees when I pitched the yeast (added the pack to a cup of water that I had boiled,and let cool,then let the yeast sit in the water about 15 minutes).

The instructions give a fermentation temperature of 55-64 and my room is set at 60, so that should be just about right in the middle of where it needs to be.

My first 2 batches all started bubbling through the airlock in under 24 hours, but with this being at a colder temperature, should I expect to wait a little longer before it starts. I do realize that just the act of bubbling doesn't mean it is or isn't fermenting, but as an initial sign, I am used to seeing it happen by now.

All in all, I am very anxious for this batch to be passing through my lips, but a long 6-8 weeks this will be until I will.

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Old 03-01-2009, 06:00 PM   #2
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The 6-8 weeks you speak of is just the fermentation time. Then you need to lager it for a couple months. To be really ready to drink, a good bock needs at least 4 months. And I would dial your fermentation temp down to at least 55 if you can. 50 would be even better.

The OG is a bit low, too. I don't know where your LHBS got their numbers, but the OG for a bock should be 1.064-1.072. But that's not something I would worry too much about at this point. Concentrate on your fermentation temps and your brew should turn out darn tasty.

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Old 03-02-2009, 02:42 AM   #3
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The 6-8 weeks you speak of is just the fermentation time. Then you need to lager it for a couple months. To be really ready to drink, a good bock needs at least 4 months. And I would dial your fermentation temp down to at least 55 if you can. 50 would be even better.

The OG is a bit low, too. I don't know where your LHBS got their numbers, but the OG for a bock should be 1.064-1.072. But that's not something I would worry too much about at this point. Concentrate on your fermentation temps and your brew should turn out darn tasty.
Could I bother you to look at the list of ingrediants and directions and see if they were poorly written?

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Old 03-02-2009, 03:02 AM   #4
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I'd shoot for a lower fermenting temperature. a 60 degree ambient is going to translate into 65+ degrees during active fermentation in the bucket.

I used S-23 on a Maibock that turned out well - maybe just a little malty with less than full attenuation, but it still tastes good. I fermented at 49 degrees.

If you want to double-check your recipe - go download a free trial copy of beersmith & run your list of ingredients there.

Good luck.

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Old 03-02-2009, 05:26 AM   #5
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I have moved the bucket to a new location that is at 50 degrees. After reading up further on lagers and bocks and temperature, I have laid out a plan that I would like some feedback on if possible.

My plan is this:

1. ferment in primary bucket for about 2 weeks at 50 degrees.
2. after that, move to a spot about 10 degrees warmer for 48 hours to "d-rest".
3. Transfer to secondary (glass carboy) and move back to 50 degrees for another 7-14 days.
4. move the carboy into a fridge to "lager" for a good 3-4 weeks.


Does that sound about right for a bock?

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Old 03-02-2009, 07:37 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatinma View Post
I have moved the bucket to a new location that is at 50 degrees. After reading up further on lagers and bocks and temperature, I have laid out a plan that I would like some feedback on if possible.

My plan is this:

1. ferment in primary bucket for about 2 weeks at 50 degrees.
2. after that, move to a spot about 10 degrees warmer for 48 hours to "d-rest".
3. Transfer to secondary (glass carboy) and move back to 50 degrees for another 7-14 days.
4. move the carboy into a fridge to "lager" for a good 3-4 weeks.


Does that sound about right for a bock?
You do your d-rest when fermentation is about 3/4 of the way finished (in this case, when it reaches 1.030-ish). You'll need to take gravity readings for that, as there is no guarantee that this will be done in two weeks.

Do your d-rest at around 65-70 deg. for 3-5 days. I don't think step 3 is necessary.

Then if you want to bottle, go ahead and bottle, and lager when your bottles are carbed. Or, you can lager in the carboy and bottle when lagering is finished. I've done it both ways. Good luck!
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Old 03-02-2009, 02:15 PM   #7
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You do your d-rest when fermentation is about 3/4 of the way finished (in this case, when it reaches 1.030-ish). You'll need to take gravity readings for that, as there is no guarantee that this will be done in two weeks.

Do your d-rest at around 65-70 deg. for 3-5 days. I don't think step 3 is necessary.

Then if you want to bottle, go ahead and bottle, and lager when your bottles are carbed. Or, you can lager in the carboy and bottle when lagering is finished. I've done it both ways. Good luck!
I appreciate all the advice you have given me thus far.

I now understand the need to test for diacetyl (flavor being one) and the time to do a diacetyl-rest when you have reached 75% FG. My question though is after I determine the primary fermentation has completed, what do you suggest the best course of action be for a noob such as I? you said step 3 is unnecessary, so no need for a secondary? Just primary long enough until I have reached FG, bottle condition at room temp for 2-3 weeks, and then stick those bottles in the fridge for a good month or so before drinking?
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Old 03-02-2009, 04:29 PM   #8
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I appreciate all the advice you have given me thus far.

I now understand the need to test for diacetyl (flavor being one) and the time to do a diacetyl-rest when you have reached 75% FG. My question though is after I determine the primary fermentation has completed, what do you suggest the best course of action be for a noob such as I? you said step 3 is unnecessary, so no need for a secondary? Just primary long enough until I have reached FG, bottle condition at room temp for 2-3 weeks, and then stick those bottles in the fridge for a good month or so before drinking?

I have done it this way. It's the easiest way, IMHO. I have also racked to secondary and lagered in there. I have also racked straight to the keg and lagered in there. As long as you get it off the yeast cake when fermentation is done.
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Old 03-02-2009, 06:12 PM   #9
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I have done it this way. It's the easiest way, IMHO. I have also racked to secondary and lagered in there. I have also racked straight to the keg and lagered in there. As long as you get it off the yeast cake when fermentation is done.
When you racked to seconday and lagered in there, did you need to add more yeast before bottling?
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Old 03-02-2009, 07:39 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Bernie Brewer View Post
The OG is a bit low, too. I don't know where your LHBS got their numbers, but the OG for a bock should be 1.064-1.072. But that's not something I would worry too much about at this point. Concentrate on your fermentation temps and your brew should turn out darn tasty.
Maybe it's more of a Shiner Bock style bock instead of a "true" bock. I brewed a Shiner clone, and while I don't remember what the OG was off the top of my head, it was more in the range of what the OP posted.
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