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Old 05-24-2012, 02:03 AM   #81
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I do 1-gallon meads and such and I love the idea of doing 1-gallon beers. Would anyone care to share photos of their 1-gallon all-grain setup? I am confused about the bias method vs methods requiring sparging, etc. thus far I am an extract + steeping grains brewer at 5-gallons. 1-gallon batches may gain me spousal support for larger batches if they are successful. How do you scale yeast for 1-gallon?

Cheers,
-Blake

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Old 05-24-2012, 03:12 AM   #82
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This is the thread for me. I'll be brewing for the first time this weekend - an all grain one gallon batch of brown ale from the Brooklyn Brew Shop book. I didn't get a kit, but instead purchased the basic ingredients from Midwest. I got all the equipment I need, plus enough grain, hops and yeast to do two batches for the same price as one of their kits. The kits are neat, but I love getting more for my money.

Space and variety are the two reasons I'm starting out with small batches. A lot of people think that everyone should have room for a 5 gallon carboy, but my husband and I are living with our 8 month old son in a small one bedroom apartment. There just isn't space for one right now, but a gallon jug I can manage.

I also like the idea of getting to try new beer more often than a larger batch would afford. Wish me luck this weekend - I'm excited to get the ball rolling.

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Old 05-24-2012, 11:49 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by blakelyc View Post
I do 1-gallon meads and such and I love the idea of doing 1-gallon beers. Would anyone care to share photos of their 1-gallon all-grain setup? I am confused about the bias method vs methods requiring sparging, etc. thus far I am an extract + steeping grains brewer at 5-gallons. 1-gallon batches may gain me spousal support for larger batches if they are successful. How do you scale yeast for 1-gallon?

Cheers,
-Blake
I hit 70% using two pots and a strainer. I use a 12 quart pot for mashing (You want to use something low, the higher the water line in the pot, the less heat you will use) and a 16 quart for my boil (avoid boilovers). I mash for a little over an hour then dump the grains into one of these:

http://www.amazon.com/HIC-Brands-tha...855856&sr=8-10

Get one that matches the diameter of your pots (hopefully your pots are the same size) so you can simply put the strainer on top of the pot, dump in your grains.

Let it drain for a minute, I often lift it up and tilt in several directions, then put the grains on top of the other pot, and SLOWLY pour the wort back through the grains, try to pour over every area but more than half through the middle. Repeat two more times.

Add the grains back to the mash pot, add your sparge water. I also have a 1 gallon pot I transfer my wort to and start heating up immediately. Stir like crazy, wait a few minutes. Repeat the whole process. I have hit 75% but my last 6 batches are all 69.5% And this is with precrushed grains as well.


Thats it. I have a few other small mesh strainers I use to pour the wort through into a chill pot to capture all the hop material, etc. A smaller pot is nice to chill in because I can easily fit it in my sink/ice-bath

As for yeast...a half pack without rehydration will take care of most beers, even higher gravity like I usually do. 3 grams is usually what you need. I often do double batch brewdays so I can use the whole pack right there.


No pics as of now, doing a fathers day triple batch brewday (Just got citra, simcoe, centinneal and summit for a few single hopped IPAs and my tasty original recipe) but I will take some then...good luck!
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Old 05-24-2012, 01:59 PM   #84
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Well....there you go! I never knew people brewed in batches smaller than 5 gallons. I was introduced to this craft doing 5 gallons at a time. I love having 2 cases of beer when I am finished.

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Old 05-25-2012, 03:42 AM   #85
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Originally Posted by Calichusetts


Add the grains back to the mash pot, add your sparge water. I also have a 1 gallon pot I transfer my wort to and start heating up immediately. Stir like crazy, wait a few minutes. Repeat the whole process. I have hit 75% but my last 6 batches are all 69.5% And this is with precrushed grains as well.
Hi Calichusetts,

Can I just ask you to clarify what you're doing in this step? It sounds to me like you take the first runnings and recirculate them through the grain a couple of times, then basically soak the grains for a few minutes in your sparge water, collect second runnings, recirculate THOSE through the grains a couple of times, then dump the second runnings into the boil kettle along with the first runnings. Is that more or less it?

My procedure has been to collect the first runnings, then to pour the sparge water through the grain into the same pot as the first runnings, then to circulate the whole volume of wort once or twice through the grain again. My efficiency seems to be in the low to mid 60s, so I'm wondering if I can boost that a bit by adopting something more like your method.

Thanks!
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Old 05-25-2012, 11:20 AM   #86
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Hi Calichusetts,

Can I just ask you to clarify what you're doing in this step? It sounds to me like you take the first runnings and recirculate them through the grain a couple of times, then basically soak the grains for a few minutes in your sparge water, collect second runnings, recirculate THOSE through the grains a couple of times, then dump the second runnings into the boil kettle along with the first runnings. Is that more or less it?

My procedure has been to collect the first runnings, then to pour the sparge water through the grain into the same pot as the first runnings, then to circulate the whole volume of wort once or twice through the grain again. My efficiency seems to be in the low to mid 60s, so I'm wondering if I can boost that a bit by adopting something more like your method.

Thanks!
I too was getting low 60s with your method. You are correct...I run the "first runnings" through the grain 3 times, allowing about a minute for it all to drain each time as I lift the strainer and tilt it in different directions. Add them back to the sparge, stir like crazy and let it sit for a few minutes, the repeat the draining process. I am not recirculating the first runnings with the sparge, that is already heating up.

Other things that have helped me are stirring fairly often during the mash, every 5 to 10 minutes, not using a bag, and extending my mash to 75 minutes. Once I get my own grain mill I can really see how well this works but I haven't fallen below 70% in quite some time now.

Good luck!
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Old 05-25-2012, 06:35 PM   #87
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Thanks very much for the clarification!

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Old 05-25-2012, 07:27 PM   #88
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My 1st batch was a brooklyn brew shop summer wheat. Yech. But i was intrigued enough to keep trying. Found a lhbs and bought ingredients for a pale that turned out really well. I did the 2-pot sparge thing maybe 3 times before switching to single pot biab.

Got tired of ending up with 7 grolsch bottles after all that work and upgraded to 7.5g kettles and a 10g mash tun, but i have some 1g test batches planned.

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Old 05-25-2012, 07:30 PM   #89
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And fwiw i think the bbs kits are an OK way to start but if you have an lhbs you can jump into 1 gallon biab for less money with some help from anyone who was brewed before.

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Old 05-25-2012, 09:12 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimpanogosSlim View Post
And fwiw i think the bbs kits are an OK way to start but if you have an lhbs you can jump into 1 gallon biab for less money with some help from anyone who was brewed before.
I started with BBS, and that's basically where most of my current process comes from, though I don't use their kits any more.

But all this raises another question that's been flitting around in my head. If I were to just do a full-volume mash in one pot, then dump the contents of the mash pot through a strainer or colander into the boil kettle and let it drain for a few minutes, is that really any different from BIAB?

Another way to put the question, I guess, is what purpose does the bag serve in the BIAB method, other than giving you a convenient way to separate the grains from the sweet wort?

Thanks!
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