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Old 10-08-2013, 11:18 AM   #3471
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Originally Posted by The_Glue View Post
I followed these recipes:

20 AAU Simcoe @ 90
20 AAU Warrior @ 90
13 AAU Chinook @ 0
2 oz Amarillo dry hopped (the beer is still fermenting so this have not been added yet)

and

1 oz CTZ @ FWH
0.5 oz CTZ @ 20 minutes from end
1 oz Cascade @ 10 minutes from end
1 oz CTZ @ 5 minutes from end
(i added about 0.5 oz (adjusted for 5 gal) amarillo at flame out because why not)
2 oz Cascade @ dry hop for 7 days (the beer is still fermenting so this have not been added yet)

Both are those recipes are for 5 gallons, i divided the amounts by 5 for my recipes.
Try an ounce at flamout and an ounce dryhop. That is what I do, I also follow more of the second recipe's style of additions with 20-0 additions every 5 minutes. My over-the-top recipes would use nearly twice this. I used 2 ounces in the boil for my last hop monster.
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Old 10-08-2013, 02:46 PM   #3472
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Try an ounce at flamout and an ounce dryhop. That is what I do, I also follow more of the second recipe's style of additions with 20-0 additions every 5 minutes. My over-the-top recipes would use nearly twice this. I used 2 ounces in the boil for my last hop monster.
1oz @ 0 and 1oz dry hop for a 1 gallon brew? That is almost twice the amount than used in a pliny the elder.

(Btw i am brewing in central-europe, it is not impossible that my hops were old/stored under bad conditions. Would ordering from the US harm my hops? That means a 1-2 week long journey for my hops mostly around 70F temp i guess)
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Old 10-08-2013, 02:55 PM   #3473
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1oz @ 0 and 1oz dry hop for a 1 gallon brew? That is almost twice the amount than used in a pliny the elder.

(Btw i am brewing in central-europe, it is not impossible that my hops were old/stored under bad conditions. Would ordering from the US harm my hops? That means a 1-2 week long journey for my hops mostly around 70F temp i guess)
You sure? If you scale it up to a barrel your not even talking about 4 pounds of hops...I know many breweries that do 4-6 pounds per barrel for their hoppy beers, some more!
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Old 10-08-2013, 03:59 PM   #3474
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You sure? If you scale it up to a barrel your not even talking about 4 pounds of hops...I know many breweries that do 4-6 pounds per barrel for their hoppy beers, some more!
If you scale up the other hops as well, you are looking at 19 pounds of hops total.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:06 PM   #3475
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1oz @ 0 and 1oz dry hop for a 1 gallon brew? That is almost twice the amount than used in a pliny the elder.

(Btw i am brewing in central-europe, it is not impossible that my hops were old/stored under bad conditions. Would ordering from the US harm my hops? That means a 1-2 week long journey for my hops mostly around 70F temp i guess)
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You sure? If you scale it up to a barrel your not even talking about 4 pounds of hops...I know many breweries that do 4-6 pounds per barrel for their hoppy beers, some more!
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If you scale up the other hops as well, you are looking at 19 pounds of hops total.
I think you are running into a unit conversion problem. There are several units of measure for liquid called a barrel, and two called a gallon.

Considering The_Glue's location you might want to switch to liters and gram measurements.

1 us gallon = 3.785 liters.
1 imperial gallon = 4.546 liters.
1 US beer barrel = 117 liters.
1 UK beer barrel = 164 liters.
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Old 10-08-2013, 06:26 PM   #3476
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Sure...here we go:

1 barrel of beer = 31 US gallons
1 pound = 16 ounces
If a brewery is using 5 pounds per barrel for a hoppy beer that is 80 ounces of hops (16 x 5)

80 ounces of hops divided by 31 (we brew 1 gallon not 31) is 2.5 ounces in a one gallon brew

I often put 1 oz in for flameout. .5 ounces over the last 20 minutes. And a tiny bitter addition of maybe .1 ounces. Finally, 1 oz dry hop and my hoppy beers, just like hoppy commercial use around 2.6 ounces a gallon. I am a hop head so this is usually my minimum. I just did one with 4 ounces total

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Old 10-09-2013, 03:34 AM   #3477
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Originally Posted by Calichusetts View Post
Sure...here we go:

1 barrel of beer = 31 US gallons
1 pound = 16 ounces
If a brewery is using 5 pounds per barrel for a hoppy beer that is 80 ounces of hops (16 x 5)

80 ounces of hops divided by 31 (we brew 1 gallon not 31) is 2.5 ounces in a one gallon brew

I often put 1 oz in for flameout. .5 ounces over the last 20 minutes. And a tiny bitter addition of maybe .1 ounces. Finally, 1 oz dry hop and my hoppy beers, just like hoppy commercial use around 2.6 ounces a gallon. I am a hop head so this is usually my minimum. I just did one with 4 ounces total
Let us know if your taste buds ever come out of hiding.
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Old 10-09-2013, 07:50 AM   #3478
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Old 10-09-2013, 01:12 PM   #3479
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I'm tired of hearing all you big boy 5-Gallon brewers telling us 1-Gallon brewers to step up. A lot of us brew 1-Gallon batches because that's all we have room for right now, not because we're afraid of stepping up our game. Trust me, if I could, I would, but in the meantime I'm actually really feeling the 1-Gallon game. Here's why:

Brew Day takes me about 3-4 hours, which includes cleanup.

I know one of the main points from 5-Gallon brewers is that "if you brew something amazing, you only have 10 bottles of it." My response- "Yea? So?" If I brew something amazing, chances are I'll brew something else amazing, and then perhaps I'll go back and brew that amazing beer again. And again.

5-Gallon brewers are always so quick to tell me- "Why put all that work in for just 10 beers." I'm not sure about you guys, but I don't consider my brew days as "work." I'm an insurance underwriter by day, but thoroughly enjoy cooking and now, brewing. I love the processes, and feel that it actually calms me. So work? I think not...

And lastly, I love the fact that I always have new things coming out of my pipeline. Yea, I just finished up drinking a really great IPA kit, but as sad as I may be to see it go, I can't wait to crack open my Weinstephaner Dunkel clone next! I'd rather have a few of LOTS of things than 50 of the same thing for 3 weeks.

So to all you big boy 5-Gallon + brewers out there, don't be so quick to hate on us 1-Gallon brewers. While eventually we'll graduate to your status, in the meantime, we're totally feeling what we've got going right now, and it's just as enjoyable for us, as it is for you.

*Disclaimer*
This thread is not meant to pick a fight or evoke negativity. It is simply in jest, although, steeped in believed truths
I feel you on the "hate". Here is what I generally say:

"You are only getting 10 beers! What if you brew something amazing?"
-First off, my "1-gallon" brews are scaled up enough to provide a twelve pack, so there I also keep detailed notes, so if I brew something awesome, I can do it again and it will be worth the wait. If that amazingness was the result of a fluke, then oh well. I'll enjoy it while it lasts.

"You are only getting 10 beers! That is not enough!"
-I have been homebrewing for roughly 15 years now. When I started, I would have said that 5 gallons was not enough for me alone, but these days, I don't drink nearly as much.

"You are only getting 10 beers! What about family, friends, the hobo down the street?"
-While I enjoy sharing my brews and turning people on to the art of homebrewing, I did not get into this hobby to provide everyone free beer and support their own habits. I also find that sharing a few bottles with someone more intimate and rewarding than simply saying Hey, there is the keg. Help yourself. I still do 5 gallon batches, though, so this is also a moot point for me.

"It takes the same amount of time, so why not just do five gallons?"
-Hmmm, well fermenting and aging takes the same time, but brew day is a heckofalot shorter. I save roughly three hours alone in heating the water, and up to another hour with sparging. Also, bottling goes a lot faster (I don't keg). The real bonus for me is that I can do four different 1-gallon brews on my stove top in roughly the same amount of time it takes me to do one 5-gallon brew.

I began doing 1-gallon batches when I became tired of experimenting in 5-gallon increments. I'd rather pitch 10 beers than 2 1/2 cases. Now, it just seems like a more efficient way for me to pursue my hobby.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
If it's a 5 gallon recipe, just divide the recipe by 5....Beer recipes are scalable. a 1 gallon recipe is 1/5 the ingredients of a 5 gallon batch, a 2.5 gallon batch is half the ingredients of a 5 gallon batch....
I did not read every single page in this thread, so perhaps this has been brought up: simply scaling down by dividing by 1/5 does not exactly work unless you also scale down your system. Many 1-gallon brewers do the BIAB method, and as you should know, sparging is not as efficient. As a result, more grain is needed, roughly 1/3 more of the amount that has been scaled down. So, if you used ten pounds of grain for a 5 gallon batch, scaling down (by 1/5), then adding 1/3, would require roughly 2.66 pounds for the one gallon batch...not 2 pounds.

Evaporation rate of water: there are a few factors that dictate the rate of evaporation, but in general the smaller the boil, and vessel, the less energy loss. That is; a smaller batch will evaporate faster--which is evidenced by many 1-gallon brewers doing 45 minute boils.

Hop utilization: many will tell you that a smaller batch requires a little bit more hops, and I find this to be true. I use the above method of dividing by 1/5 than adding roughly 1/3 of that amount back. So, if 1 oz. of bittering hops were asked, I would use 0.25 oz. (slightly less than +1/3) in stead of 0.2 oz.

But hey, this is just what I found with my system. Perhaps others can just truly scale down and go.

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Originally Posted by divrguy View Post
Small batching must be getting more and more popular as my latest visit to Morebeer had a nice display of one gallon jugs, 3 gallon jugs and mini kegs! Good sign!!
One gallon jugs are popular with wine makers, and have been for some time. One gallon to a home wine maker is the equivalent of 5 gallons to the homebrewer. I have noticed 3 gallon carboys becoming more popular...or at least in more stores. Then again, I never looked for one prior to a few years ago, so perhaps there were always there and I never noticed?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stankonia View Post
Do all you 1-gallon brewers use pretty much the same method for bottling? bottling bucket with spigot? Do you use a different vessel rather than the typical 5-6gallon bottling buckets that are out there?

also, for all-grain brewers..any problems with holding mash temps for a long enough period of time?
I use the exact same method and bottling bucket that I would use for a 5+ gallon batch.
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Old 10-09-2013, 04:53 PM   #3480
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...One gallon jugs are popular with wine makers, and have been for some time. One gallon to a home wine maker is the equivalent of 5 gallons to the homebrewer...
As a winemaker I would say, not really. A gallon of wine usually only yields 4 bottles. Sometimes 5 if it's a little over a gallon batch and you're very careful about wastage.

I will admit that most of my mead batches are around 2 gallons though. Five pounds of honey seems to translate fairly well into two gallons of mead.
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