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Old 03-11-2013, 01:05 AM   #2741
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Originally Posted by JollyIsTheRoger

There are a bunch scattered through this thread, there is some on my blog below and my brewtoad. But mostly, just divide a 5 gallon recipe by 5 and its the same thing. The ones I have I optimized for 1 gallon, so there isn't 6.53oz of some malt, I just round them out and make the recipes from a 1 gallon mindframe.
Where do u buy your grains?
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Old 03-11-2013, 01:06 AM   #2742
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Refresh my memory, folks: Cold-crashing before secondary to help squeeze as much brew out of the primary as possible - reasonable, or waste of time?

My first batch of Requiem Raspberry is due to be racked to secondary tomorrow, and I recall some folks talking about cold crashing before racking to help drop as much yeast and sediment out of solution as possible before racking to help boost the overall yield.

So what do y'all suggest? crash it, or just leave it be and rack as usual?
Hmm, crashing should improve your yield somewhat. If it's a batch you expect to be extremely good, or that you have expensive ingredients in I'd probably crash before racking. Otherwise, I'm not really sure it's worth the effort.

I find that crashing for 3 days to a week helps compact the sediment so it doesn't get stirred up as much when you have to move the carboy prior to racking.

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ok guys... i learned something today, by accident, that might be useful

cracked open a home brew that has been in the bottle for about 3 months (as opposed to the three weeks i usually wait).

oh boy, what a difference. if you want wait, it's definitely worth the wait.

clear, crisp, just the right amount of bite to it, and a head on the beer to die for.

jambalaya and home brew for lunch.

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Old 03-11-2013, 02:55 AM   #2743
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Originally Posted by Leadgolem

Hmm, crashing should improve your yield somewhat. If it's a batch you expect to be extremely good, or that you have expensive ingredients in I'd probably crash before racking. Otherwise, I'm not really sure it's worth the effort.

I find that crashing for 3 days to a week helps compact the sediment so it doesn't get stirred up as much when you have to move the carboy prior to racking.

Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzcWwmwChVE
What is cold crashing?
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Old 03-11-2013, 03:04 AM   #2744
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What is cold crashing?
Cooling your brew down to refrigerator temperatures. At those temperatures, most of the yeast will go into a kind of metabolic shutdown. Very much like hibernation. IE: they sleep, or "crash". When they do, they tend to fall out of solution. That clears the brew up if what you have in suspension is live yeast.
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Old 03-11-2013, 03:19 AM   #2745
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Originally Posted by paul_111
I don't understand the comparison to open fermentation, tho.
I've had open fermentation on the brain since last week when I read a thread about how a guy gets more banana flavor on his Hef's when he does open fermentation.

I figure you can't get more headspace than a whole room of headspace. It still makes a CO2 blanket and they still do fine. I'm guessing that those complaining about too much headspace have only brewed "by the book" and don't have any real experience with 70% headspace.
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Old 03-11-2013, 04:38 AM   #2746
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Originally Posted by BattleGoat
@bleme: Open fermentation is fine, if you're going for a lambic or other sour style. Not so much with the other styles, however. And as mentioned, he's a little safer simply fermenting in that BB than he would be using it as a secondary, but still. That's a *hell* of a lot of headspace to worry about.
This is false. Why is open fermentation only ok for those styles?

There are lots of breweries out there using open fermentation for all kinds of beers. Open fermentation is very popular for large scale breweries in UK and Germany. If you've ever had anything from ringwood or wychwood breweries, all there beers are open fermented. Everything from blondes to bitters.
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Old 03-11-2013, 01:58 PM   #2747
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Perhaps I need to clarify once again. My *original* comment to @paul_111 expressed concern that using his 3-gallon to *secondary* in would cause problems. That's my main issue. Perhaps I wasn't clear enough in subsequent comments. All I know is that in *most* cases, when you open-ferment a beer that's not specifically meant to be fermented that way, you're courting infection. After all, if open fermentation was totally safe and appropriate across the board, why do any of us use closed fermenters or airlocks in the first place?

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Old 03-11-2013, 03:02 PM   #2748
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Originally Posted by BattleGoat
Perhaps I need to clarify once again. My *original* comment to @paul_111 expressed concern that using his 3-gallon to *secondary* in would cause problems. That's my main issue. Perhaps I wasn't clear enough in subsequent comments. All I know is that in *most* cases, when you open-ferment a beer that's not specifically meant to be fermented that way, you're courting infection. After all, if open fermentation was totally safe and appropriate across the board, why do any of us use closed fermenters or airlocks in the first place?
Good point.
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:37 PM   #2749
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A week ago today, I opened and sampled a 12oz bottle of dopplebock that had been bottle conditioning for 1 week at ~61 degrees. I drank roughly the neck of the bottle. Not enough carbonation. I recapped and placed it back where it came from. I put that bottle in the fridge last night and am going to try it this evening. What do you think I can expect?

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Old 03-11-2013, 08:21 PM   #2750
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Originally Posted by muleskinner90 View Post
A week ago today, I opened and sampled a 12oz bottle of dopplebock that had been bottle conditioning for 1 week at ~61 degrees. I drank roughly the neck of the bottle. Not enough carbonation. I recapped and placed it back where it came from. I put that bottle in the fridge last night and am going to try it this evening. What do you think I can expect?
Little to no change....'1 week at about 61 degrees' is not even close to enough bottle conditioning time. Minimum is 2 weeks at 68 to 70 degrees...my basement is about 64 degrees and it took about 6 to 8 weeks to get the right amount of carbonation for some of my beers. Then maybe a sitting a cold fridge for a week before opening.

I would wait at least another month before trying another bottle unless you can't wait and don't mind drinking the beer a little flat
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