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Old 07-05-2007, 05:50 PM   #1
carnevoodoo
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Default 1.078 to 1.022

I made a strong IPA and I'm wondering if I should repitch or if I should just accept the FG at 1.022. I didn't make a starter and I know I should have (and I will be starting to do so for every batch in the future) so it might just be that the yeast is done.

What do you think? Should I try pitching some more yeast or should I just deal?

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Old 07-05-2007, 06:27 PM   #2
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need
more
info...

recipe, yeast, conditions, process,ect..

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Old 07-05-2007, 06:28 PM   #3
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Looks like you got 70% attenuation.

  • What yeast strain did you use? What's its standard attenuation range?
  • What did your grain bill look like? Anything like carapils or maltodextrin in there?
  • What did your mash schedule look like? High in the temp range?

if you have a lot of unfermentable sugars in there, then 1.022 is fine.

On the other hand, I've noticed a disturbing trend on my beers that finish high like that: once you prime and bottle them, the sugar that you've added is just enough to wake the yeast back up, and once they get started, they eat the rest of the sugar that they forgot to get to in primary. Not sure what to do, but I do know that I've ended up with some...um...gushers.
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Old 07-05-2007, 06:35 PM   #4
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Oh, it is an extract batch. I think it was 9lb DME, some steeping grains (I think we're looking at some crystal and some carapils here, can't remember exactly though) and the yeast was WLP007. I guess 70% would be at the low end of the attenuation of that yeast.

I don't think I have a lot of unfermentable sugar in there, but it is possible it could just be done.

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Old 07-05-2007, 07:39 PM   #5
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That yeast should have gone a little further....hmmmm. It should be OK. If your temps were on the cool side, you might move it to a warmer location to motivate some more activity, but if not it should still be ok!
If your yeast really did crap out, it never hurts to add a little dry yeast to your bottling bucket, but it shouldn't be necessary.

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Old 07-05-2007, 08:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan!
On the other hand, I've noticed a disturbing trend on my beers that finish high like that: once you prime and bottle them, the sugar that you've added is just enough to wake the yeast back up, and once they get started, they eat the rest of the sugar that they forgot to get to in primary. Not sure what to do, but I do know that I've ended up with some...um...gushers.
I've had a number of beers finish high but havn't had this problem. I attribute mine more to yeast choice (WLP002) and mash temp.
However maybe adding some sugar (6-8oz of corn sugar) would wake up your yeast in the secondary and finish the beer off before bottling? Since that seems to work for you in the bottle.
I would also think some warmer temps might help also.
Craig
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Old 07-05-2007, 08:45 PM   #7
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I have had it controlled below 70 degrees for the entire fermentation. I'm not going to bottle it until late next week, so I'll let it warm up a bit and see if anything happens.

If not, Ill just bottle it.

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Old 07-06-2007, 08:00 PM   #8
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Good choice, also Whitelabs recommends starting fermentation well over 70 if possible and then moving to a cooler location after a day or so. I figure this gives the yeast a jump start and is too early to do any harm. I cool my wort to 80 or so and pitch on that. Even in the 67 or so degrees it takes the wort a while to cool and so I get a similar benefit. Good Luck!

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