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Old 08-27-2008, 09:31 PM   #21
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While I think that Sam Adams boston lager is better ... there is a specific flavor and detail .....a certain earthy-ness that it has.. it's a iron-dark metalic / roasty-grain flavor that can't be seen in lagers anywhere else.. I like it... it's in my top 5 lagers...

I'd try it out...

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Old 08-27-2008, 09:45 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by 98EXL View Post
I don't think it's worth your taste buds' time really, there are so many better lagers than that
Actually Yuengling is pretty good. It's a nice step up from BMC, it's inexpensive and is fairly widely available. I also appreciate the fact that it's still a family-owned business.

There's a pretty good writeup in today's Washington Post (8/27): Biggest of a Dying Breed.

I haven't tried their Lord Chesterfield Ale. That sounds pretty good.
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Old 08-27-2008, 09:57 PM   #23
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Flaked maize from the homebrew shop is pre-gelatinized. It can be mixed directly with your grains and mashed. Corn grits (unless you use instant grits) are like polenta and will require a cereal mash to release the starches and make them available for mashing.

The BYO article on American Pilsner has some information for doing a cereal mash with corn grits, though Chris Colby doesn't do a protein rest at ~120°, which I've seen recommended elsewhere for cereal mashes. Treat the separate cereal mash as a decoction for calculating the strike temp of your main mash, i.e. strike low knowing that you'll be adding a quantity of boiling cereal mash.

Chad
Good article, but I am not getting the "add some 6-row to your adjunct and then boil it for half an hour" part.... The purpose of the boil is to gelatinize starches in your adjunct so that they are more accesable to enzymatic degredation in your mash. For the several beers with adjuncts that I have done with normal everyday plain white rice (not minute rice, the real stuff) I bring a mixture 2 parts water and 1 part rice by volume to a boil for ~10minutes, and simmer covered for another 20-30 minutes until the rice is almost mush. This is then added to my main mash which works through a 122-148-168 temp mash. I have had great sucess with this proceedure.

Anyways, why add the 6-row for 5 minutes then boil? You wont get much (if any) enzymatic conversion in that time, esp if the starches are not gelatinized, then you boil the crap out of it. Not getting the point here.....
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Old 08-27-2008, 10:23 PM   #24
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Anyways, why add the 6-row for 5 minutes then boil? You wont get much (if any) enzymatic conversion in that time, esp if the starches are not gelatinized, then you boil the crap out of it. Not getting the point here.....
Good point. This is the only explanation I can find.

This guy's method makes more sense to me: Cereal Mashing. He mashes the corn with some 2-row at 153° for 20 minutes to get conversion, then boils for gelatinization. Note the links at the bottom of the page.

As you rightly point out, there seems to be some confusion and misinformation about what actually happens in the cereal mash. Does the added grain actually convert the starches? Can they even be converted before they are gelatinized? Or are you just gelatinizing starches from the adjunct to release them for conversion in the main mash?

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Old 08-27-2008, 10:29 PM   #25
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Just because I'm intrigued by cereal mashing:

Preparing a Corn Mash.
and
What is the American adjunct mash for?

Chad

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Old 08-27-2008, 10:50 PM   #26
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anyone want to ship me a bottle?
...if you really really want some, I can. I second that it's not really worth the effort.

Now, if we were talking Penn, Victory, Sly Fox or Stoudts, that's a different story.
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Old 08-27-2008, 11:07 PM   #27
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Munton's premium Lager canned kit is real similar to Yeungling.

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Old 08-27-2008, 11:20 PM   #28
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anyone want to ship me a bottle?
I agree with the above posts on shipping a bottle. I've also noticed that their bottles are a crap shoot, sometimes its good, and more often in my experience its terrible, not sure what the deal is there. Draft seems to be the best bet, though i've been meaning to try it in cans.
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Old 08-28-2008, 12:18 AM   #29
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Good point. This is the only explanation I can find.

This guy's method makes more sense to me: Cereal Mashing. He mashes the corn with some 2-row at 153° for 20 minutes to get conversion, then boils for gelatinization. Note the links at the bottom of the page.

As you rightly point out, there seems to be some confusion and misinformation about what actually happens in the cereal mash. Does the added grain actually convert the starches? Can they even be converted before they are gelatinized? Or are you just gelatinizing starches from the adjunct to release them for conversion in the main mash?

Chad

Ahhh, I see.... I do admit my way gets the "goo" effect, but I found adding the goo to my strike water before I add the grains and stiring the crap out of it frees up all the individual grains of rice. At that point I dough in with the rest of my grains to my first step temp at 122. I have not had any problems lautering with this method, but my adjunct concentration has never exceeded 35% either.....
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Old 02-24-2011, 03:59 AM   #30
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This is what I found:
This week's recipes is a Yuengling Clone. Yuengling calls itself America's oldest brewery and is located here in Pennsylvania. I had the pleasure of touring the brewery in 2001 and it was excellent. Yuengling makes several products and this recipe is from Tastybrew.com is for the Amber Lager. Notes About The Recipe This recipes calls for rice. I know for a fact that Yuengling uses corn grits. Yes, corn grits, the kind that you can buy at the grocery store. I have used corn grits it recipes and I know that they can cause boil overs. So, after the malt begins to boil, slowly add the corn grits and stir to keep them from settling to the bottom of the pot. Name Yuengling Clone Description Lager Clone Added by bsummers12 Date Submitted Fri, 23 Nov 2001 01:07 PM (GMT)
Ingredients
4.5 lbs Laaglander Light Malt Extract
1 lb Rice
1 lb Cara-pils
.5 lb Crystal Malt
1 oz Northern Brewer hops (60 mins)
1/3 oz Tettnanger (10 mins)
1/5 oz Saaz (5 mins)
California Lager 2112 yeast
Preparation
Steep grains in 1 gallon water at 158 degrees for 1/2 hour. Remove grains. Add DME and rice solids. Boil 1 hour adding hops at times listed above. Cool wort and pitch yeast.
Specifics
Style Lager Recipe Type Partial Mash Batch Size 5 US gallons Original Gravity 1.047 Final Gravity 1.012 Boiling Time 60 mins Primary Fermentation Plastic, 7 days @ 68 degrees Secondary Fermentation Glass, 14 days @ 65 degrees Other Specifics 22 IBU's 4.7% AC
Comments
Best after aging in bottle in a cool place 1 month.
instead of the using the grits and all, try using rice extract. So just do the normal steeping. Now boil as normal, but add the rice extract as a late boil addition. As far as lagering it..... I may be crazy but, when I have made this I took I believe pilsen lager yeast and brewed it @ room temp. This is against most anything I read, but it worked out really well, and was a huge hit at my house on tap.
Hope this helps.

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