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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > When to use US-05 vs. S-04?
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Old 12-23-2011, 06:20 AM   #11
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Notty can demolish a beer, so if you are trying to shy away from dry, be wary. Like others have said US-05 for American styles, and for that matter Notty is versatile, but fairly clean at lower temps and can attenuate well. US-04 is an English strain that will finish sweeter, and add some esters especially at the higher end of the temperature range. I just pitched a 10 gallon split batch of lower gravity IPA with Notty in 5 gallons, and US-05 in the other 5 gallons.

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Old 12-23-2011, 07:27 AM   #12
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Since no one has mentioned it yet these yeasts are from very iconic breweries, S-04 is Fullers strain and US-05 is from Sierra Nevada.

The formulation of SNPA vs ESB is not far off (in terms of hopping rate, gravity, grist) either so that really showcases the difference between these yeasts.

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Old 12-23-2011, 07:44 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cellarbrau View Post
Since no one has mentioned it yet these yeasts are from very iconic breweries, S-04 is Fullers strain and US-05 is from Sierra Nevada.

The formulation of SNPA vs ESB is not far off (in terms of hopping rate, gravity, grist) either so that really showcases the difference between these yeasts.
Citations please.

Although these yeasts may have come from the same original source, is there any information to indicate that these are indeed the exact same strain?
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Old 12-23-2011, 08:16 AM   #14
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Um... you got me. A brewer in the UK told me so.

I think the US-05 being from chico is pretty well established.

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Old 12-23-2011, 08:45 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Cellarbrau View Post
Um... you got me. A brewer in the UK told me so.

I think the US-05 being from chico is pretty well established.
I have heard over and over that the strain is of the same origin, but at this point for them to be identical would be a stretch. WLP001 for instance probably wouldn't do too well at 60°F. However, I am unfamiliar with the Wyeast 1056 version which is supposed to be the same exact strain (over a dollar more in my area, so I opt for the WLP version [having said that, I used dry yeast fro my last brew day because I did not have time to make a starter before brewing].)

I have a split batch in the ferm chamber now with US-05 in one, and Notty in the other.

I could make a 3 gallon batch and split it using WLP001, Wyeast 1056, and US-05. I would end up with a very slightly, yet close variation, but not exactly the same. Although a very sensitive palette would be necessary to distinguish the nuances; the three beers would be different in their own.

I'm not trying to get into an argument, I am simply stating that each yeast brand is different (ever so slightly) which allows brewers even more diversity and options on brew day.

Many yeast strains may derive from a similar source, yet they have mutated into their own opposed to their origin. It can be easy to say that they are the "same" while indeed they may be "similar," but they are different.

Just sayin'

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Old 12-23-2011, 12:26 PM   #16
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S-04 is not from Fullers. The Fullers strain is WLP002 or 1968. S-04 is the Whitbread strain which is why many find it oddly estery.

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Old 12-23-2011, 12:50 PM   #17
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Personally I only use S-04 in my dark beers. Stouts, porters, and browns.

For pales ales, IPAs, and my red ale I stick with US-05.

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Old 12-23-2011, 12:56 PM   #18
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SO4 is the equivalent of WLP007

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Old 12-23-2011, 01:41 PM   #19
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Quote:
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SO4 is the equivalent of WLP007
I have read that somewhere as well, but I think it's much closer to the regular Whitbread yeast. Dry English has a more neutral flavor profile and attenuates more.
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Old 12-23-2011, 01:44 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by sudsmcgee View Post
Us-05 tastes much better above 68 degrees than s-04 if thats an issue.
That's a big deal to me!

I will often use S04 if my fermentation temperatures will be under 64 degrees, as I find that it's pretty "clean" at cool temperatures but if it gets the least bit above 65, it does get the typical English esters. Ironically, S05 can throw a few esters UNDER 64 degrees! But stays really clean over 65 degrees.

I do love the way S04 clears a beer so that I get crystal clear beer in a week using it.

I use S04 in several American IPAs, I just really have to control the fermentation temperature.
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