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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > What volume of water, temp, time, timing, to steep grains.
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Old 01-17-2008, 09:55 PM   #11
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I've also read that when removing the grain bag, just let it drip into the pot... don't squeeze the bag to get that extra water out quickly - you could be squeezing tannins into the wort...

course, that being said, i've steeped grains without any sort of thermometer, and then squeezed the bag at the end, and had a great brew.

I have also read that it's easier to get astringent tasting tannins from darker grains... so what might be allowable for lighter grains might get you in trouble when you make a stout.

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Old 01-17-2008, 10:35 PM   #12
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Not trying to hijack this thread, but what kind of flavors do tannins impart to the beer and how do you know you've got them?

Can you over sparge specialty grains? I have had a tendency to sparge the grains until the water coming out of the bottom of the bag is clear. With darker beers that never happens, so I was wondering if you can "over sparge".

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Old 01-17-2008, 11:14 PM   #13
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I have always use 150F for 30 min usually in roughly 2 gallons of water then rinse with 168F water. Not sure if this makes it better or worse but its the way I have always done it.

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Old 01-18-2008, 01:00 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bills Brew
Not trying to hijack this thread, but what kind of flavors do tannins impart to the beer and how do you know you've got them?

Can you over sparge specialty grains? I have had a tendency to sparge the grains until the water coming out of the bottom of the bag is clear. With darker beers that never happens, so I was wondering if you can "over sparge".
tannin flavor is usually described as "astringent"

you can't really over sparge, the temp of your sparge water is the most important (<170F)
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Old 01-18-2008, 03:48 AM   #15
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Tannins are astringent (that puckering sort of dry sensation), and they also can be bitter.


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Old 01-18-2008, 06:39 AM   #16
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Default Don't worry...

General rule of thumb is 25 minutes at 155 degrees... Watch the video I posted if you have any questions but seriously:

once I boiled the grains for about 20 minutes, and my beer was great.

another time I squeezed the grain bag like it were a tea bag and I wanted all the liquid possible in my brew, it still turned out great.

and then I even forgot to add the grain till it was already boiling, added it, and let the wort cool to about 195 degrees, the beer still turned out great.

don't worry- just keep making mistakes until your recipe is considered "unique" and you win a prize for it!

You never know till the end, and then if you can drink your "mistakes" it probably wasn't now was it...

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Old 01-18-2008, 06:47 AM   #17
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http://byo.com/mrwizard/1050.html

----------------------------------------------

Palmer also says you can squeeze the bag so it dont drip on the stove
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Old 01-18-2008, 06:03 PM   #18
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Palmer also says to use 1 gallon of water per 1lb of grain. HOw come it seems as though nobody uses that guideline?

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Old 01-18-2008, 06:22 PM   #19
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Because, long before the good Mr. Palmer published his book, I was doing something else that worked just fine. It wasn't broke, so I didn't fix it.

(and, just as an aside, the "good Mr. Palmer" really is a good guy - one of the nicest guys I've ever met. He really knows his stuff and enjoys teaching others)


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Old 01-04-2011, 03:11 AM   #20
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Default Steeping

We have used 60/40 grain to extract using 2.75 gallons in the steep at 180. Using higher amounts of grain works great with a warmer temperature. Steeping in the nylon allows for the grain to move around and create the wort. Wort is the backbone and our philosophy has always shown using the water to steep instead of 'add to volume' towards the end yields the best taste from our grain.

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