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Old 04-11-2013, 09:08 PM   #11
BostonianBrewer
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Alright so should I pour the mash right into the water I will be cooking my lme in and start to boil it with everything?

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Old 04-11-2013, 09:53 PM   #12
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yup, but to save time I'd be heating that other water to boil while you mash. if you reach boil first, just go with it and add the mash during it.

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Old 04-12-2013, 12:09 AM   #13
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I only have a 5-6 gal pot I use for the wort and another maybe 1 gal pot to try and do the grains in will that suffice seeing as its only 1# ? I've never had to use two before

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Old 04-12-2013, 12:48 AM   #14
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DCP has given you a lot of good advice. Here are some slightly different and more detailed instructions for mashing.

Belgian Pale Malt needs to be mashed. 1 lb in 1 to 2 quarts of water. Start with 3 pints of water heat to 160 F, and grains in bag. The temperature after adding the grains will be about 150 F. This is good. Put lid on pot and try and keep warm. You want it to be above 146 F for the 30 minutes. This is a low mash temp, but since this is a Belgian ale, this is good. Stir grains occasionally.

Heat the rest of the water separately. The more water you boil, the better, but it takes longer to heat up and longer to cool. I'd say 3 gallons would be good for the first time.

After 30 minutes of mashing (it is OK to go longer) and when the main water is about 170 F, remove the grains from the mash/wort, and 'rinse' them in the main water to rinse off any extra sugars. This will improve efficiency of the mash.

Remove the grains and add the mash/wort to the main kettle. Then add the LME as suggested by DCP.

Good luck.

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Old 04-12-2013, 02:37 AM   #15
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Thanks Calder that really helped a lot & CDP you have also been vital to helping me gain the knowledge and confidence to go ahead an tackle this brew I will be keeping you posted , one last question when I'm done with my boil can I add cool water to brig the batch to its final 5 gal before I cool the wort , I feel like this will help bring my temp closer to pitching temp faster or should I just stick with just the ice bath first

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Old 04-12-2013, 11:08 PM   #16
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No, you want to bring the temp of the wort down quickly. Adding water at this stage will only add to your cooling time. Assuming you're doing this on your stove, place the kettle in an ice bath in the sink. Adding salt to the water will bring the temp down even faster. Be sure to stir both the wort and the ice water. Once the temp is down to 70F you can add your top-off water. Stir and take your gravity reading, then pitch your yeast.

Next comes the hardest part of home brewing: waiting the for yeast to do their stuff and then waiting even longer for the beer to carbonate in the bottle. Enjoy.

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Old 04-13-2013, 12:58 AM   #17
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Can I help cool the wort with some top off water?

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Old 04-13-2013, 10:58 AM   #18
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You are better off not trying to use the top-off water to cool the wort. Coming off the boil the wort is obviously still very hot. The top-off water will cool it somewhat, but not significantly. You would then be attempting to cool much more wort than you would have had to otherwise, making the job harder. It will only add to your cooling time.

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Old 04-13-2013, 01:52 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonianBrewer View Post
Can I help cool the wort with some top off water?
adding top off will cool it much lower initially, but the higher thermal mass of a larger volume will slow it down in the long run. Drop the kettle into the ice bath and stir occassionally, after a few top off with as cold of water as you can. adding the candi syrup or honey, dextrose & half extract at flameout will help drop the temp a lil too. the wort will be hot enough to sanitize these, so no worries on adding it that late, just give it a few mins to mix in before cooling.

fyi, it's difficult to get an accurate OG reading when adding top off water, it takes a lot of mixing. depending on how well you extract from the belgian pale, it looks like your OG should be around 1.062 - 1.068. if its outside of that, it likely wasn't mixed fully or the volume isn't correct.
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Old 04-14-2013, 02:56 AM   #20
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Adding top-off water while hot can contribute to hot side aeration (it is debated as the whether this is a real issue). I would stay away from it. If you want to do it, use cooled boiled water as the act of boiling the water reduces the amount of O2 in the water.

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