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Old 04-04-2011, 10:33 AM   #11
Rolling_Thunder
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Glad to hear it's working out well so far.

Oddly enough (referring to your warm beer comment), my last batch (of which I only have one 22 oz bottle left) I was testing periodically to see how it was carbonating. I'd grab one (I had them in a box in my mud room and I'd see them as soon as I came through the door from work. They were like an NFL cheerleader greating me everyday as I came through the door!) Anyway, where was I?....Oh ya, so as I was taste testing them it was at room temp (68 degrees) and after they conditioned and chilled in the fridge I found that I actually prefer it at room temp.

I've heard stories about how Europeans drink beer warm and it always used to make the hair on my neck stand on end. Now I've accidentally discovered it's not such a horrific thing to do.

My next venture with this recipe is to add in a beer gas system and push it through a Guinness faucet to give it that creamy foam and minimal carbonation and see what that does. I've been wanting to get into kegging anyway so the slightly higher cost of the Nitrogen/Co2 setup doesn't bother me. I'm gonna cook up a 20 gallon batch in a couple weeks. I'll bottle 5 gallons and keg the rest and see how she goes...

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Old 04-04-2011, 11:06 AM   #12
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When you say Europeans drink beer warm, I think that you may be referring to us Brits who drink what we call "real ale". It's not all of us, just the ones who prefer the taste over the now ubiquitous euro-fizz lagers which are being foisted on us by the big brewing companies. Sorry, rant over.

Our real ale is a live product, conditioned in casks and usually kept in a cellar at about 13-15 degrees centigrade and is then pulled up to serve by a hand-pump. So that's the temp we like. The beer is not full of taste-bud-killing gas and is not too cold to taste. Neither is it too warm. Just right in our humble opinions.

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Old 04-05-2011, 10:39 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by BeerEagle View Post
When you say Europeans drink beer warm, I think that you may be referring to us Brits who drink what we call "real ale". It's not all of us, just the ones who prefer the taste over the now ubiquitous euro-fizz lagers which are being foisted on us by the big brewing companies. Sorry, rant over.

Our real ale is a live product, conditioned in casks and usually kept in a cellar at about 13-15 degrees centigrade and is then pulled up to serve by a hand-pump. So that's the temp we like. The beer is not full of taste-bud-killing gas and is not too cold to taste. Neither is it too warm. Just right in our humble opinions.
3 months ago I wouldn't have had a clue as to what you could have been describing. Today however, it makes perfect sense and sounds delicious! This "real ale" is something I MUST have before I begin my eternal dirt nap.

For this recipe, in the future, I think I'll store my bottled brews in my wine fridge over the summer. They'll be cool but not cold and as you say "just right."

Thanks for the enlightenment BeerEagle...
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Old 04-05-2011, 08:24 PM   #14
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What is Malto Dextrin - (8 oz. package) and where can I find it???

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Old 04-06-2011, 10:15 AM   #15
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What is Malto Dextrin - (8 oz. package) and where can I find it???
Good question. Answer: "Derived from corn, this is non-fermentable. It is used to add body to a beer. If you are an extract brewer and your beers are coming out on the thin side, this here will take care of you. Add during last 15 minutes of your boil."

Use 4 oz. to 5 gallons of beer.

For those of us that are lactose intolerant Malto Dextrin is what you substitute. If you have no problem with lactose (you can drink milk and not get gassy & bloated) I recommend using the lactose. Whichever you prefer.

I get all my stuff (except bottles-I get those at my local home brew joint) through this place... http://www.rebelbrewer.com/shoppingc...52d-8-oz..html If I place my order on Monday the order is on my doorstep Wednesday and that's just their regular shipping.


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Old 04-06-2011, 12:16 PM   #16
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So would I use 4oz of Lactose or 8oz of Malto?

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Old 04-07-2011, 10:56 AM   #17
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So would I use 4oz of Lactose or 8oz of Malto?
I'd start out with 4 oz. of either, but you can safely use (when I say safely I mean it won't ruin the taste) 4, 5,or 6 oz's. I was using it in an effort to create a creamy mouth feel, but it didn't end up with that effect. Instead makes the beer more rich in flavor for lack of a better way to describe it...
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Old 04-13-2011, 10:16 PM   #18
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Drank a carbed beer at fridge temp and then warmer,around 50-55F. This beer definitely benefits from a higher temp. Now I just have to wait for it patiently if that's possible. Thanks for the recipe, this will be brewed again AG in August and I'll let you know how it goes.

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Old 04-14-2011, 10:45 AM   #19
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Drank a carbed beer at fridge temp and then warmer,around 50-55F. This beer definitely benefits from a higher temp. Now I just have to wait for it patiently if that's possible. Thanks for the recipe, this will be brewed again AG in August and I'll let you know how it goes.
Sounds like it's coming along nicely. Please keep us informed on the AG recipe. I've wondered about that and would I'd like to hear how that works out. I hope you have more willpower than I do. I couldn't leave it alone once I had the first couple.

To take this a step further I'm going to be brewing up a 20 gallon batch in the next couple of weeks. Gonna keg 10 gallons & bottle 10 gallons (word is spreading and I now have many requests from friends in Montana, California, Virginia, Georgia, Texas, Mass and Vermont). So an idea came to me the other day...."self, what do you think about putting this brew on 'beer gas' and dispensing through a Guinness stout faucet?" I mulled it over for a few minutes and the more I thought about it the more delicious it occurred to me it would be! My biggest concern now is will 20 gallons be enough?!! I work with a bunch of guys that are VERY fond of this recipe in bottles. I'm pretty sure if they get a glass of this on a 'beer gas' setup they'll be at my house everyday like ants on a melted chocolate bar.

So this is going to neccessitate the purchase of a larger brew pot, Guinness tap, nitrogen tank & regulator, kegs and modifying my garage fridge. About $800 should cover it (including the ingredients for the large batch). Then the next investment is a big ass Blichmann fermenter and if I'm really feeling crazy and the AG brew comes out well I'll have to take the plunge and get an AG setup too!
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Old 04-14-2011, 11:32 AM   #20
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Had a buddy bring me back a growler of Mountain Ale last year, great stuff. Subscribing so that I can keep up to date as the AG attempts are done.

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