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Old 11-30-2012, 07:55 PM   #11
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Yooper -

Adding the late addition of LME at flame out would be easier than killing the heat at 45 minutes, adding it, and then bringing it back to a boil for 15 minutes. My hop additions would be timed properly this way also.

Is that safe to do? Will all of the LME mix properly at flame out? Even though it will never be brought back to a boil after that?

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Old 11-30-2012, 09:45 PM   #12
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There are two reasons for the boil, one is for hop utilization as it takes boiling to isomerize the hop oils to get the bittering. The other reason is for pasteurization. You usually don't need to boil to pasteurize and your LME is already pasteurized so by adding it at flame out you will still have mixed it in water at the boiling point and it will be pasteurized again before you can chill the wort past the 160 degrees required for pasteurization.

We're talking pasteurization, not sterilization which does require higher temperatures.

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Old 11-30-2012, 10:29 PM   #13
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Yooper -

Adding the late addition of LME at flame out would be easier than killing the heat at 45 minutes, adding it, and then bringing it back to a boil for 15 minutes. My hop additions would be timed properly this way also.

Is that safe to do? Will all of the LME mix properly at flame out? Even though it will never be brought back to a boil after that?
Yes, it's fine. Use a whisk or something (especially with DME, since it can clump) but you're still way above pasteurization temperatures.
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Old 12-01-2012, 12:09 AM   #14
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Thanks a lot to everyone who responded! I really appreciate it! THANK YOU!!

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Old 12-01-2012, 01:00 AM   #15
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I've heard not to use RO water either unless you are adding some minerals back in first. I have used spring water from the store for all of my batches except the most recent one. On that one I used a brita filter on the water I was boiling and spring water for the top off. We'll see how it turns out. Hoping to be all grain in the next month or so, then I can hopefully use brita water for all of it.
I don't to belabor the point, but why wouldn't you use RO water with extract? The argument about the minerals is for mashing, and has nothing at all to do with the extract (which has already been mashed).

That's fine, if people speak from experience, but that isn't based on any scientific principle at all. RO is actually the most ideal water to use for extract brewing, as a matter of fact.

It's also ideal for AG brewing, but usually with one or two very small additions of gypsum and/or calcium chloride.

Using a brita filter for AG might be ok, depending on the actual water source as brita won't remove sulfate, chloride, bicarbonate, magnesium, and so on. It may not remove chloramine.
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Old 12-02-2012, 12:31 AM   #16
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... The argument about the minerals is for mashing, and has nothing at all to do with the extract (which has already been mashed).

...

Using a brita filter for AG might be ok, depending on the actual water source as brita won't remove sulfate, chloride, bicarbonate, magnesium, and so on. It may not remove chloramine.
Thanks for the clarification Yooper. I just used tap water (city water, Detroit). I was thinking of sending two samples to the lab, one tap and one brita filtered, just to see what is still in there.
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Old 12-07-2012, 03:18 PM   #17
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Yooper -
I've been researching your comment about using RO water and I trust your advice. I have a good quality RO system installed in my kitchen. I only questioned using my water when my first 3 batches of home brew had the same off flavors....but now I know that could be happening for a variety of reasons, mainly things that I need to correct in my brewing process like fermentation temp control and things like that.

I found a post where you state "I've used 100% RO water for pilsners, 75% RO for cream ales, 40% RO water for pale ales, and the only beer I use my tap water at 100% for is a stout." When you said this, were you talking about AG brewing? Also, when you say 75%, 40%, etc...what makes up the other 25% / 60%?? Are you talking about 75% RO water with 25% tap water??

You also mentioned that RO is perfect for AG brewing if you add a little gypsum and calcium chloride. What about Extract brewing? Should I add a little of these to my RO water while doing an Extract batch? If so, how much? I'm doing a full boil 5 gallon batch, so I'll probably start with 6 1/4 gallons in my brew kettle.

I'm getting ready to brew an IPA extract kit this weekend. My plan was to use tap water this time and add 1/4 of a crushed campden tablet to it. What would you do?

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