Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > need advice, Carbonated out of the secondary
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-07-2009, 03:37 PM   #1
ZOG
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 59
Default need advice, Carbonated out of the secondary

I started a pilsner a while back and it all but hit the final gravity after a bit in the secondary. I then lowered the temp to 35 and lagered for a month in a glass carboy still using an air lock. Yesterday I transfered it to the bottling bucket and then started filling bottles. I then noticed than the beer was Carbonated some already. now when I took the air lock from the carboy there was no pressure at all so how did it become carbonated. I transfered the beer to the bottling bucket then to the bottles straight from the fridge. the beer was still cold going into the bottles.

Tasted like a green pils though so the flavor seemed right


Do I now have 36 flip top bombs?

I filled them all already.. any suggestions

__________________

ZOG is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2009, 03:40 PM   #2
MultumInParvo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Detroit, Michigan
Posts: 791
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

There can be a little carbonation just from the fermentation. I wouldn't be concerned at all. The extra carbonation wouldn't be enough to explode any bottles, and likely not enough to even notice a difference.

__________________
MultumInParvo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2009, 03:48 PM   #3
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 22,105
Liked 1015 Times on 678 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default

There's a bit of pressure at the bottom of every vessel of liquid and the 35F temp made it easier for some of the co2 to stay dissolved there.

__________________
BrewHardware.com
Sightglass, Refractometer, Ball Valve, Weldless bulkhead, Thermometer, Decals, Stainless Steel Fittings, Compression Fittings, Camlock Quick Disconnects, Scale, RIMS tube, Plate Chiller, Chugger Pump, Super Clear Silicone Tubing, and more!

New Stuff?
Bobby_M is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2009, 03:53 PM   #4
TipsyDragon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: California
Posts: 2,607
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts

Default

while i agree with the others you have noting to worry about. beer, an other liquids, are easier to carbonate at lower temps. the lower the temp the less priming sugar you need to get desired carbonation levels.

__________________
TipsyDragon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2009, 03:57 PM   #5
ZOG
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 59
Default

so in general, is it better to allow the beer to warm to room temp before transferring into the bottling bucketto aid in the release of this carbonation? or does it still not matter?

__________________

ZOG is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2009, 04:51 PM   #6
TipsyDragon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: California
Posts: 2,607
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts

Default

i've never made a lagger so i don't know for sure. but if your at the bottling phase then the laggering process is done and it shouldn't hurt to warm it up. but i would get some advice from other people that have more experience on the subject than me.

__________________
TipsyDragon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2009, 06:34 PM   #7
Schwoopty
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Minnetonka, MN
Posts: 45
Default

From what I understand you will want to bottle at the same temp that you last fermented at. The more fluctuation in your temperature, the quicker your beer will produce off flavors or spoil (at least I think thats the reasoning behind it). Im guessing the overall effect of raising the temperature for bottling is minimal compared to other factors that could effect your beer.

A second opinion on this is probably warrented, or a more detailed explanation as to why this is, or isnt, the case.

__________________
www.sphbc.org

On Deck - Celebration Ale Clone
Primary - Itchy Nut Brown Ale
Kegged - S&S Kolsch, Lagunitas Censored Ale Clone
Bottled - Irish Draught Ale, Chocolate Cinnamon Stout, Alaskan Amber Clone
Schwoopty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2009, 07:24 PM   #8
Scimmia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: QCA, Iowa
Posts: 959
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Ever wonder why all of the priming calculators out there ask for the temperature of the beer? This residual carbonation is why. The colder the beer, the more CO2 it can/will have already dissolved, which can be considerable. I doubt it would be enough to cause bombs, but it could certainly cause over/under carbonation.

__________________
Scimmia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2009, 01:09 PM   #9
bierbrauer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Toronto
Posts: 72
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scimmia View Post
Ever wonder why all of the priming calculators out there ask for the temperature of the beer? This residual carbonation is why. The colder the beer, the more CO2 it can/will have already dissolved, which can be considerable. I doubt it would be enough to cause bombs, but it could certainly cause over/under carbonation.
So essentially because of the temperature there is more or less dissolved CO2 in the beer already at time of bottling. Which means you can add less sugar while bottling to get the desired level of carbonation?
__________________
Primary 1:Golden Shower APA
Primary 2: Dry Stout (5gal)
Bottled:Stone Epic 09.09.09 Clone,Eclipse Stout (11 gal),Bitter Blond, Belgian Dubbel #2, SNC IIPA (So Not a Clone IIPA), Imperial Pale Ale
Keg 1 Golden Shower APA
Keg 2: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone
Keg 3: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone
Keg 4: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone
Keg 5: Citra Pale Ale
Keg 6: Export Stout
Keg 7: Export Stout
Keg 8: Faux Blonde
Keg 9: Empty
Keg 10 (3gal): Empty
On Deck:
bierbrauer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2009, 01:20 PM   #10
ZOG
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 59
Default

after the debate I went to the Beer Smith and used the calculator and played a bit with it.

I am going to have 3.2 volumes of Co2 which is a bit much.

this was 5 lager and they all have been great. so I expect this too be as well. just a bit over carbed.

I also learned a great lesson which is what this place is about.

__________________
ZOG is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottling time! advice please! accroul Cider Forum 3 05-27-2009 01:18 AM
Advice on premature bottling Beau815 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 03-20-2009 06:22 PM
Need advice for bottling with rum Braid Bottling/Kegging 0 02-25-2009 04:03 AM
Bottling advice? Monk Bottling/Kegging 25 03-13-2006 07:04 PM
bottling advice... BootYtRappeR Bottling/Kegging 6 09-29-2005 01:28 AM