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waynepresley 04-09-2013 09:05 PM

mashing steeping grains
 
I'm planning on brewing an extract IPA with Munich "steeping" grains. I read that you need to mash Munich and it's not all that good for steeping.
So my question is, if i put my milled 1.5 lbs Munich grain in 3 qt of water at 150 degrees for 45 mins, will this basically be mashing it? and roughly how much would this add to my OG?

latium 04-10-2013 12:23 AM

According to this chart, you'd be looking at an increase of about 9 points (i.e., .009) in a five-gallon batch, assuming 85% efficiency. Maybe 8 points for 75% efficiency, depending on which calculator or desktop software you use. And yes, you'd be mashing it.

Yooper 04-10-2013 12:40 AM

Sure, "steeping" at a prescribed temperature between 145 and 160 for a prescribed time (normally 45-60 minutes) with a prescribed amount of water (1-2 quarts per pound of grain) is mashing.

billl 04-10-2013 12:48 AM

The diastatic power of Munich really depends on who is malting it. Generally, the darker the color, the lower the ability to self convert. The lighter ones convert pretty well. The darker ones are marginal, but should work as long as your other parameters are OK - eg temp, ph, mash thickness.

If you are going to "mash" anyway, you may look up a partial-mash recipe and make the jump. It is really no harder to mash 4 lbs than 1.5 lbs.

waynepresley 04-10-2013 05:02 PM

Thanks for the replies everyone!

Calder 04-11-2013 01:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by billl (Post 5092603)
It is really no harder to mash 4 lbs than 1.5 lbs.

It is easier to mash 4 lbs than 1.5 lbs. The larger the mass, the easier it is to hit and maintain the temperature.

BostonianBrewer 04-11-2013 01:02 PM

Not to steal the thread but I have a recipie that calls or me to steep 1# Belgian pale Malt at 160 for 10min should I go a little longer and make it a mash / steep ???

Yooper 04-11-2013 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BostonianBrewer (Post 5097513)
Not to steal the thread but I have a recipie that calls or me to steep 1# Belgian pale Malt at 160 for 10min should I go a little longer and make it a mash / steep ???

If it's pale malt, that is a base malt and should be mashed. I'd hold it at 150-155 for 45-60 minutes. One pound of malt won't do much, but if you don't mash it you may get a starch haze in the finished beer. I'd either mash it, or leave it out.

kombat 04-11-2013 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yooper (Post 5092570)
Sure, "steeping" at a prescribed temperature between 145 and 160 for a prescribed time (normally 45-60 minutes) with a prescribed amount of water (1-2 quarts per pound of grain) is mashing.

Doesn't "mashing" imply that at least some conversion is taking place?

I was under the impression that when you "steep" the specialty grains, all you're doing is leeching out the sugars that were already converted during the kilning process, or kilned to the point of no longer being fermentable. No conversion is occurring.

I thought in order for it to be a "mash," you have to have some unconverted starch at the beginning, which the enzymes will convert to fermentable sugars.

Yooper 04-11-2013 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kombat (Post 5097604)
Doesn't "mashing" imply that at least some conversion is taking place?

I was under the impression that when you "steep" the specialty grains, all you're doing is leeching out the sugars that were already converted during the kilning process, or kilned to the point of no longer being fermentable. No conversion is occurring.

I thought in order for it to be a "mash," you have to have some unconverted starch at the beginning, which the enzymes will convert to fermentable sugars.

Yes. That is way I have "steeping" in quotations.

Holding a prescribed temperature, with a prescribed amount of water, for a prescribed length of time is "mashing". That's the technique. But in order for conversion to take place, a base malt needs to be used. When a base malt is used, and held properly at the proper temps, enzymatic activity occurs. We are not talking about specialty grains here. We're talking about Munich malt and Belgian pale malt. Those are base grains.


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