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Old 02-07-2012, 05:42 AM   #1
kike_gimenez
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Default Liquid Malt Extract Questions

Hello all im a very new homebrewer and I came across a manufacturer here in my country that makes liquid malted extract products and they confirmed me that they provide to major breweries across the country.

Products were detailed as follows:

- Non Diastatic Liquid Malt Extract.
- Diastatic Liquid Malt Extract.
- High Maltose.
- Inverted Sugar.

My question is, are these or any of these ingredients usable for brewing ? I ask this because I just started brewing beer and for now I've only tried Coopers Extract kits, and they are really hard for me to get here. I was hoping these ingredients could work to put up a good wort so I can add some hops and make some decent beer following some recipes and learning tru these processes.

Thanks in advance for your responses. As for the details of the components of these extracts which I thought you guys may ask. If the manufactures says they sell these products to brewing companies my guess is mostly barley, and probably some rice and corn. One other thing might be how much water % those extract have in order to achieve the proper sugars on the wort for fermentation.

But I thought Id start by asking if these products are suitable for making beer.

Happy brewing guys. Peace

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Old 02-07-2012, 06:04 AM   #2
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Yup, you're good bud. You should be able to search for plenty of data on diastatic power, invert sugar, etc.

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Old 02-07-2012, 05:47 PM   #3
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From what Ive could found. The NON Diastatic extract is the one used for brewing beer.

I was thinking I could get a positive assumption on this on the internet. Something like "Yes I've used Non Diastatic Liquid Malt Extract from barley in many recipes. I have a recipe that is 4lbs of Non Diastatic LME 1lbs of Diastatic LME + 30g Golding Hops at 30 + 20 Golding hops at 15min + 10g of Golding Hops at 5 min"

I guess theres no harm on tryin out a recipe with this NON Diastatic LME + High Maltose + Inverted Sugar + Hops. Using a recycled yeast from last batch of Dark Ale.

If anyone has brewed with this type of malts please let me know, or if they know a recipe.

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Old 02-07-2012, 06:00 PM   #4
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Really, it depends on what you want the extract to do. If you don't need to convert sugars in steeped grains, you're fine to use the non-diastatic. However, if you're using adjuncts or other grains in which you want the starches to convert into fermentable sugars (without the use of diastatic barley malt), you need the diastatic extract for that purpose.

The real question with the extracts comes down to the flavor profiles they create. As far as I know, there is no real flavor difference based on diastatic power, but you might want to find out how they rate the extract and what the grist bill was that went into making it. For example, here in the States, you usually find extract grades delineated as Extra Light, Light (aka Pilsner), Amber, Dark Amber, or Dark, each created with different grains and applicable to different styles of beer. You can also usually find wheat extract and even specialties like Munich extract.

I'm not really sure where "High Maltose" extract comes into play, but looking around the web, it looks like it's typically referring to non-barley based sorghum or corn syrups, which can be used in brewing, you just might want to look more into the flavors you'll be deriving from them. Sorghum leaves a very sweet cotton-candy like flavor even fully fermented.

As for the invert sugar, sure, Belgian Candi Sugar is an inverted syrup, and has been used in brewing for centuries.

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Old 02-07-2012, 06:32 PM   #5
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Thanks Gypsy!

I just got a hold of the exact details of this specific LME.

It comes down to this:

- Total Solids: Bx. 80 +- 2%
- Dextrines 14.5 +- 0.5%
- Color(Lintner grade): 4 - 14
- Proteins: 3.0 +- 1
- Fermentable Sugars (total): 50 +- 58.9 im guessing percentage.
- Density: 1.4mg/LT

Im guessing is in the range of amber/light LME and it is definetly usable for brewing. They also confirmed me that these extracts are used by local brewing companies.

So all thats left is to make the desired recipe. Propably as stated above make a base recipe to get the exact flavor of this extract. And from there modify it with other sugars and hops.

I will read up on this and once I do the test. Ill let you guys know.

Thanks again Gypsy.

Happy Brewing

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Old 09-13-2012, 10:38 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kike_gimenez View Post
Thanks Gypsy!

I just got a hold of the exact details of this specific LME.

It comes down to this:

- Total Solids: Bx. 80 +- 2%
- Dextrines 14.5 +- 0.5%
- Color(Lintner grade): 4 - 14
- Proteins: 3.0 +- 1
- Fermentable Sugars (total): 50 +- 58.9 im guessing percentage.
- Density: 1.4mg/LT

Im guessing is in the range of amber/light LME and it is definetly usable for brewing. They also confirmed me that these extracts are used by local brewing companies.

So all thats left is to make the desired recipe. Propably as stated above make a base recipe to get the exact flavor of this extract. And from there modify it with other sugars and hops.

I will read up on this and once I do the test. Ill let you guys know.

Thanks again Gypsy.

Happy Brewing
So, have you sorted a recipe for this and if so, how did it go?
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