New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > Light vs Dark Extracts




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-27-2010, 06:42 PM   #1
Joeywhat
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Dearborn Heights, MI
Posts: 203
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Light vs Dark Extracts

OK, I figured this had been answered but my search turned up little (or my google-fu is weak today...). What differences are there between a light and dark extract? I'm talking specifically about liquid for my purposes but if dry extract is different then I'd like to know.

For instance, is there ANY difference short of color between an 'extra light' and 'light' extract? What about 'light' and 'amber' or 'dark'? From what I've seen some of the darker extracts have crystal or other grains added in as well. Is the a rule or does it depend on who's making it?

Ultimately what I'm wondering is how going from light extract to extra light will effect my recipe. I'm going to add some darker grains and want to keep color light, so I was going to switch to the lighter extract. However if that also means I get a more watered down taste I'll just deal with the darker color.



__________________
Joeywhat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 06:57 PM   #2
mbird
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: California
Posts: 309
Likes Given: 1

Default

The darker extracts will have a different flavor to begin with. I think it is best for you to taste sample them to determine which is best for the style that you are brewing. I personally always use the light extract as the base sugar needed for the beer (typically DME) and then add to that the different grains to produce the style I want. Even when making a stout or porter. If you begin with the darker extract you are limited to the type of beer you can make to style. You may prefer the taste of a dark malt extract when making a stout, porter, etc. or you may prefer the taste of light extract and the use of more dark steeping grains in the recipe. It is really up to you to determine which is best for your tastes. I hope this helps a little.
mark
www.backyardbrewer.blogspot.com
www.thebackyardbrewer.com



__________________
mbird is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 07:47 PM   #3
Gremlyn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,525
Liked 22 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

My issue with the darker extracts is that you don't know what grains makes them dark. If you've used them a few times, you can get a handle of what the flavour of the beer comes out like at the end, but that's far too much work IMO. I used to use the lightest extract I could get for the style (wheat, extra light, pale, etc) and then add the colour with specialty grain. It's the surest way to have control over your beer flavour.

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
I'm a fan of "getting it in the can"!
Gremlyn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 08:39 PM   #4
Joeywhat
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Dearborn Heights, MI
Posts: 203
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Now is this true only with dark(er) extracts? For example, does light extract have a different flavor then extra light? Or are the differences too minute to tell when you're that light (short of color)?

__________________
Joeywhat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 09:05 PM   #5
maida7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 2,816
Liked 42 Times on 37 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joeywhat View Post
Now is this true only with dark(er) extracts? For example, does light extract have a different flavor then extra light? Or are the differences too minute to tell when you're that light (short of color)?
The names are not regulated. within one company you'd expect a difference between light and extra light. But then there is another brand that calls it golden. and another that calls it pale. and yet another that goes by ultra light. ALL of those are fairly similar and may be used interchangeably with subtle differences.

Then you English VS American VS pilsner VS Munich VS wheat. Each have a use and can be blended to make different bases.
__________________
maida7 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 09:25 PM   #6
Pappers_
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Pappers_'s Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 11,215
Liked 805 Times on 584 Posts
Likes Given: 1819

Default

^ what they said

Use the lightest extract available as your base malt then add specialty grains (such as crystal malts and roasted barley) to add flavor and color.

Cheers!

Pappers_ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 10:48 PM   #7
HSM
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: McMurray, PA
Posts: 477
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappers View Post
^ what they said

Use the lightest extract available as your base malt then add specialty grains (such as crystal malts and roasted barley) to add flavor and color.

Cheers!
^^^^
Best advice you'll receive on this thread.
__________________

"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis."
www.TheFreeSpeak.com

HSM is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 10:52 PM   #8
Gremlyn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,525
Liked 22 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HSM View Post
Best advice you'll receive on this thread.
NOOOOO! You're WRONG! This was:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gremlyn1 View Post
I used to use the lightest extract I could get for the style (wheat, extra light, pale, etc) and then add the colour with specialty grain. It's the surest way to have control over your beer flavour.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
I'm a fan of "getting it in the can"!
Gremlyn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 11:06 PM   #9
Joeywhat
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Dearborn Heights, MI
Posts: 203
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

OK, thanks for the help. I'll make sure and grab extra light from now on and adjust the grains accordingly.

Is there EVER a time where darker extracts are better when using steeping grains as well?

__________________
Joeywhat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2010, 11:31 PM   #10
Pappers_
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Pappers_'s Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 11,215
Liked 805 Times on 584 Posts
Likes Given: 1819

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gremlyn1 View Post
NOOOOO! You're WRONG! This was:
I bow to Gremlyn's sure and quick response. You should always follow his advice. My advice is best approached cautiously, unless I'm merely repeating Gremlyn's advice.


__________________
http://www.singingboysbrewing.com
Pappers_ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Honey: Light vs. Dark KCPyrate Mead Forum 7 08-05-2009 03:23 PM
Secondary in light or dark mudog Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 07-27-2009 05:10 AM
Does using liquid extracts always equal a fairly dark brew? rogerroy Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 04-06-2009 03:53 AM
stout...Light or Dark DME Evan Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 11-01-2007 05:03 PM
Want to brew a dark light pstdu4brew Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 08-08-2007 03:01 PM