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Old 05-07-2007, 01:23 PM   #1
BroncoBob
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Default Let's Talk About Red Ales

Newbie here....long time Extract Brewer..since 1998...120 batches.
I just attended the Big Brew event here in Boise Idaho and got fired up to brew again after a short hiatus.

I would like to make a English Style (bitter) Red Ale that has a great red color and a frothy white head.

Anyone have a great Extract recipe?

I have lost all of my recipes in a computer meltdown, but I know I used to make it a few years ago...

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Old 05-08-2007, 02:29 AM   #2
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Date 6/3/1995
Batch 10
Name Abbey Road Red
Variety Number 1
Cost Per
Ingredients: Quantity Uom Cost Unit
$0.00 $0.000
Tettinger Hops 1 Oz $0.75 $0.750
English Plain Mild Malt 6 Lb $6.00 $1.000
Bc Liquid Pale Malt Extract 2 Lb $4.58 $2.292
Edme Yeast 12 Gram $1.25 $0.104
Liberty Hops 2 Oz $0.75 $0.375

Total Cost $13.33

Hydrometer Readings Temp Plus Hydrm Pot. Alcohol

Initial 85 0.0400 1.0390 4.09%
Final 70 0 1.015 1.57%
Total 2.52%

Bottling Size # Total Oz Cost Per Oz
Springs Caps 12 24 288
22 10 220
32 0
48
Total 508 0.026246719

12 Oz Bottle Equiv. 42.33333333 $0.31

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Old 05-08-2007, 02:35 PM   #3
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Default Sorry

Sorry About that....but I lost the internet connection during the last post...
I meant to ask for some input/feedback about the recipe posted.

Will is work to give me a good Irish Red Ale?

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Old 05-08-2007, 02:50 PM   #4
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Where's the "red" coming from?

Never used or heard much about the "English Plain Mild Malt." If you're really looking to impart a red color, steep some high-lovibond crystal malt (maybe some 60L) and maybe steep a couple ounces of roasted barley (not enough to impart much flavor, just a lot of color). Don't use a lot of crystal, as I think this beer wants to be reasonably dry.

You have no steeping grains in the recipe at all?

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Old 05-08-2007, 03:04 PM   #5
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Not to be an ass, but there's really no such thing as an English Red Ale, although several English PA's are reddish-brown in color.

Red ale is kindof of a nebulous style, actually. Irish Red Ale (e.g. Smithwicks) is the only classic red ale. American red ale is kindof a de facto style that's generally a little more over-the-top in grainbill and possibly hopbill. (My local brewpub makes an American red which is almost bordering on sweet stout--quite dark and extremely malty/sweet with low IBUs and no late addition hops that I can tell.)

I think of red ales as the maltier, richer side of the bitter/pale ale family. The key is to mash or steep higher L crystal malts and possibly small amounts of roasted barley for color. A little munich enhances the maltiness and the red hue, IMHO.

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Old 05-08-2007, 03:51 PM   #6
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Yeah, lots of red ales are really sweet. Irish Reds aren't, so those don't want a lot of crystal malt, but the domestic red ales that you see around are often basically sweeter versions of amber ales. I'd first decide which direction you want to go - dry or sweet - and then work up the recipe from there. That'll also impact things like which yeast strain to use, how aggressively to hop it (I've had and made some killer hoppy reds).

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Old 05-09-2007, 02:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cweston
Not to be an ass, but there's really no such thing as an English Red Ale, although several English PA's are reddish-brown in color.

Red ale is kindof of a nebulous style, actually. Irish Red Ale (e.g. Smithwicks) is the only classic red ale. American red ale is kindof a de facto style that's generally a little more over-the-top in grainbill and possibly hopbill. (My local brewpub makes an American red which is almost bordering on sweet stout--quite dark and extremely malty/sweet with low IBUs and no late addition hops that I can tell.)

I think of red ales as the maltier, richer side of the bitter/pale ale family. The key is to mash or steep higher L crystal malts and possibly small amounts of roasted barley for color. A little munich enhances the maltiness and the red hue, IMHO.
No problem...thanks for the tips. I should have said Irish Red Ale.....I like a beer that you can still taste 10 minutes after you finish....
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Old 05-09-2007, 02:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_bird
Yeah, lots of red ales are really sweet. Irish Reds aren't, so those don't want a lot of crystal malt, but the domestic red ales that you see around are often basically sweeter versions of amber ales. I'd first decide which direction you want to go - dry or sweet - and then work up the recipe from there. That'll also impact things like which yeast strain to use, how aggressively to hop it (I've had and made some killer hoppy reds).
A hoppy Red is exactly what I am looking for....mucho gracious for the advice....
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Old 05-09-2007, 03:21 PM   #9
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Take a look at my "Murder In The Red Barn" in the recipe database; it's basically a red IPA. LOTS of flavor and aroma. Domestic flavor, though - not English.

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"no, he just doesn't speak 'stupid'. i, however, am fluent...." - motobrewer
"... I'll go both ways." - Melana

That'll do, Pigley. That'll do.
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