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Old 09-04-2012, 12:16 AM   #1
olhoss
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Default Lager tasting ale

This will probably get some contentious comments but please they are my taste buds and it's what I like.
Now, I would like to find an ale yeast that gives the same flavor characteristics as lagering. At our condo there is no room to add a lagering refrigerator. The interior temps are just standard room temps. No basement or anything like that. So I am very limited. Even Steam beer is out because it needs around 54F to ferment. So ale yeasts are it.
So does any one know of an ale yeast that has the flavor characteristics I'm looking for?

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Old 09-04-2012, 12:50 AM   #2
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Kolsch might fit your bill.

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Old 09-04-2012, 12:54 AM   #3
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I've never brewed a lager, but I understand the yeast ferments clean. One of the cleanest ale yeasts available is PacMan.

Temperature range for PacMan is 48 to 72 F. Obviously lower temps will produce cleaner tasting beers.

Proprietary yeast strain from Rogue breweries in Oregon. Ferments very clean with little or no esters which will highlight your grain and hop flavors. Massive attenuation will ferment just about everything it can get its cells on, leaving you with a low final gravity for crisp, refreshing brews. It prefers to ferment in the 62 to 64° range, but it can handle temps down to the mid 40's and up to 70° depending on what style you are making, which makes it a great all-around workhorse yeast for any beer that you want to completely ferment. Great flocculation characteristics leave your beers clear, too. Try it in a Barley Wine!

Profile (from Wyeast): A versatile yeast strain from one of Oregon's leading craft breweries. Pacman is alcohol tolerant, flocculent, attenuates well and will produce beers with little to no diacetyl. Very mild fruit complements a dry, mineral finish making this a fairly neutral strain. Pacman's flavor profile and performance makes it a great choice for use in many different beer styles.

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Old 09-04-2012, 12:55 AM   #4
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I think you could pull off a steam beer. Can you setup a simple rope bucket with some water and frozen water bottles to lower the temp a few degrees?

As an alternative. You might want to try out the Centennial Blonde recipe on this site.

PacMan is awesome. I use it for most of my beers.

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Old 09-06-2012, 04:12 PM   #5
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I have done two beers with WLP810, SF Lager yeast. I fermented them around 68~70 F, and they turned out really delicious. Of the 7 brews I've done, these have been my favorite.

I can only realistically keep my thermostat around 72F, so I throw a wet towel over the fermenter to drop it a little more.

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Old 09-06-2012, 08:48 PM   #6
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Use all light malts,use a clean ale yeast as low as it'll go & work well. I have to look up the names again,but I've run across a couple hop strains that give a crisp flavor as well. I'm going to add them to this equastion in a couple months when it cools down around here.
I've been wanting to do the same thing,but with that good beer flavor I remember from the 50's & early sixties with beers that aren't around here in the Cleveland area anymore.
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Old 09-06-2012, 09:24 PM   #7
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How about Nottingham Ale Yeast made by a company called Danstar. It's a dry yeast so it's cheap. I have used it for lagers and they have fermented at room temperature. The taste is always good.
I have noticed that my local brew shop packages it's own kits with Nottingham Ale Yeast for the lagers or ales. This shows the versatility.
This yeast is commonly available and it is often called for on recipes listed on the site including Centennial Blonde extra.
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Old 09-06-2012, 09:30 PM   #8
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I'm looking back through my links for the site that described some hops as being "crisp". That's my idea to brew with light malts & a clean yeast down in the 60's. No fruity yeasts or hops that give any ale qualities are my initial thoughts. I'll report back if/when I rediscover what I found last month. I've been wanting to try this myself.
Just keep it cleann & crisp,& that should theoretically be close...
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Old 09-06-2012, 10:42 PM   #9
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Agreed on all comments so far. Looking at Wyeast's site for the kolsch yeast it says:
"Temperature Range: 56-70° F (13-21° C)"

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Old 09-09-2012, 11:34 PM   #10
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I'll second the nomination for a kolsch. That's the best beer I have made yet.

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