Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > Kit Saison brew, herb or citrus zest addition
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-18-2012, 03:45 AM   #1
tbrown4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 116
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default Kit Saison brew. Herb addition? Update!

Just ordered some NB extract kits. Going to brew the Petite Saison some time in the next week or so. Im thinking of splitting up the batch for primary, adding some stuff to one, leave the other alone. Would like use some herbs, maybe some citrus zest. Trying to add some nice aroma and flavor notes.

Anybody here have experience with what Im trying for?

Recommendations and suggestions would be appreciated.

__________________

tbrown4 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-18-2012, 04:54 AM   #2
RiffMagnum
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ft. Worth, Texas
Posts: 184
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbrown4 View Post
Just ordered some NB extract kits. Going to brew the Petite Saison some time in the next week or so. Im thinking of splitting up the batch for primary, adding some stuff to one, leave the other alone. Would like use some herbs, maybe some citrus zest. Trying to add some nice aroma and flavor notes.

Anybody here have experience with what Im trying for?

Recommendations and suggestions would be appreciated.

Orange peel, coriander, grains of paradise, black pepper all seem to work for saisons. I'd keep the amounts at 1 oz or less. The grains of paradise and black pepper only need about a half teaspoon for a 5 gallon boil. Throw it in with five minutes left on your boil. You don't want a fine powder, just coarsely crushed/cracked.
__________________
RiffMagnum is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-18-2012, 10:51 AM   #3
tbrown4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 116
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RiffMagnum View Post
Orange peel, coriander, grains of paradise, black pepper all seem to work for saisons. I'd keep the amounts at 1 oz or less. The grains of paradise and black pepper only need about a half teaspoon for a 5 gallon boil. Throw it in with five minutes left on your boil. You don't want a fine powder, just coarsely crushed/cracked.
Thanks for the tips!
__________________
tbrown4 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-18-2012, 01:35 PM   #4
ardonthorn5
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: clearfield, pa
Posts: 202
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

I used grains of paradise and some orange peel in my petite saison ... came out great! I would recommend both. I used a half oz. of paradise grains in a 5 gallon batch, so adjust accordingly.

__________________
ardonthorn5 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-19-2012, 04:54 AM   #5
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,883
Liked 305 Times on 271 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Forget the additions, and put your energies to figure out how to keep the beer in the mid 70s for fermentation.

The yeast is what makes this type of beer, and it needs to be fermented igh to express it's character.

If you want to split the batch, try fermenting one at 70 F, and the other at 80 F. There will be a huge difference.

__________________
Calder is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-19-2012, 05:11 AM   #6
tbrown4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 116
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder
Forget the additions, and put your energies to figure out how to keep the beer in the mid 70s for fermentation.

The yeast is what makes this type of beer, and it needs to be fermented igh to express it's character.

If you want to split the batch, try fermenting one at 70 F, and the other at 80 F. There will be a huge difference.
Ive got a warm room at the front of my house, upstairs. Thats my best shot.
__________________
tbrown4 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-19-2012, 05:11 AM   #7
RiffMagnum
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ft. Worth, Texas
Posts: 184
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
Forget the additions, and put your energies to figure out how to keep the beer in the mid 70s for fermentation.

The yeast is what makes this type of beer, and it needs to be fermented igh to express it's character.

If you want to split the batch, try fermenting one at 70 F, and the other at 80 F. There will be a huge difference.
No, don't forget the additions. Most saison recipes have multiple spice additions that, in addition to the yeast character, give the saison it's trademark spicey/zesty/funkiness.
Summer is coming. It's not too hard to get high temps. I have a saison in my closet right now and it's pretty toasty in there on it's own. House thermostat is set to 75-77 and i have a blanket around the fermenter to keep in the heat.
__________________
RiffMagnum is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-19-2012, 05:15 AM   #8
RiffMagnum
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ft. Worth, Texas
Posts: 184
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbrown4 View Post
Ive got a warm room at the front of my house, upstairs. Thats my best shot.
There ya go. Keep in mind that during active fermentation the temp inside your carboy can get 5-10 degrees hotter than the ambient temp in your room. So after a week or so, you might have to find a room/garage/porch that gets even hotter. I've heard people push saisons close to 90 degrees!!
Anyways, what strain of yeast are you using? Some don't need as much heat as others.
__________________
RiffMagnum is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-19-2012, 05:23 AM   #9
tbrown4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 116
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RiffMagnum
Anyways, what strain of yeast are you using?
Wyeast 3711 French Saison
__________________
tbrown4 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-19-2012, 05:29 AM   #10
RiffMagnum
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Ft. Worth, Texas
Posts: 184
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tbrown4 View Post
Wyeast 3711 French Saison
cool. You should be good to go with high 70's to low 80's. I'm currently doing one with 3724 and it might be time to take a trip to my garage!! Of course i'm in Texas so i got no trouble finding heat either way. If i have to leave put my thermostat on 80, then that's what i'll do.
__________________
RiffMagnum is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools




Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS