Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > kegged....man, I got some questions...
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-05-2006, 02:48 PM   #1
Ol' Grog
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Chickasha, OK.
Posts: 1,037
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default kegged....man, I got some questions...

Kegged last night, Friday just didn't work. Well, kegged and brewed. Anyway, this isn't as straight forward as I thought.
First, the standard 5 gallon brew was way too much. I bet I waisted about 4 beers. Almost made me cry but I couldn't remember how much sugar to put in an individual bottle (as opposed to priming a whole batch for bottling).
Second, I was playing around with the regulator and tank pressure while I was shaking the corny, some of the brew foamed up inside the pressure line. I didn't think that was possible. But, if there is no pressure on the feed line, then of course, there is nothing to prevent a "back foam" I concluded. Hope this is correct.
Third, I let of some of the pressure in the keg via the pressure relief valve and then the thing wouldn't seat or something because it started hissing, this was at about 20 psi. Is there a trick to those things? I read somewhere that you can actually turned them a certain way and "lock" it in????
Fourth, and the most difficult part to understand. I pressurized it up to about 30 psi. Shook it with the regulator off, and the pressure started going down. I will assume that the brew was absorbing the CO2. Well, it does that at any pressure. I currently have it in the garage and it's about 65. According to the charts, I need to pressurize it to about 25 to 26 psi. Do I still shake it? How long will it have to sit in that pressure? How do I know when it's done? What's stopping me from letting it sit at say 15 psi for one week? But again, how will I know when it's done?
Appreciate ANY REPLY's...........

__________________
Ol' Grog is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2006, 02:52 PM   #2
Baron von BeeGee
Beer Bully
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Baron von BeeGee's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Barony of Fuquay-Varina, NC
Posts: 5,419
Liked 16 Times on 15 Posts

Default

1/2 tsp should work for bottle priming.

I would not shake the keg without having CO2 on it...you could get backflow into your regulator and trash it which is an expensive mistake.

No idea about your pressure relief valve, there's many different kinds but it should seat back.

You really need to get your keg chilled down towards serving temps and then use the chart. You'll probably be putting 12-16psi to it.

I avoid all that shaking crap by just racking to keg, putting it in the kegerator, and setting my final psi (around 14psi in my case). It's always ready within a week which is fine by me.

Don't mean to sound obvious, but it's ready when you pour it and it's carb'ed to your satisfaction

__________________
Baron von BeeGee is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2006, 03:23 PM   #3
Ol' Grog
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Chickasha, OK.
Posts: 1,037
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Thanks. It didn't back flow into the regulator. I immeadiately applied pressure and blew the foam back into the keg. I hope that pressure line was sanitized. It should at least be clean, it was brand new, out of the bag. I thought we had to shake them. I mean, does the brew slowly and eventually absorb the CO2 even though there is a tiny amount of head space in the corny for the CO2? I mean, won't the top area get absorbed first and then "quit?" That was what I trying to figure out. Is there a saturation point for the brews whereas it won't absorb any more CO2 and then that tells you it's done? What will happen if I pressurize it under the chart pressures? Just takes longer?

__________________
Ol' Grog is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2006, 03:40 PM   #4
Baron von BeeGee
Beer Bully
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Baron von BeeGee's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Barony of Fuquay-Varina, NC
Posts: 5,419
Liked 16 Times on 15 Posts

Default

The beer will eventually absorb the CO2 in 5-7 days usually. Shaking is a shortcut and not at all mandatory.

__________________
Baron von BeeGee is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2006, 04:05 PM   #5
Mikey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: I'm gone!
Posts: 668
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

The laws of physics and mother nature will take care of carbing your beer very nicely without needing any help from us interfering humans. The only circumstance where you would want to shake the cornie is to have the beer carbed 'right away'.

Connect your CO2, adjust to the correct serving pressure and let nature do the rest. Come back in a few days, et voila!

__________________
Mikey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2006, 04:09 PM   #6
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,654
Liked 135 Times on 128 Posts

Default

If you pressurize to the chart pressure (and leave it alone) it will be fine in about a week. As the ale absorbs CO2, more CO2 bleeds into the keg. The ale keeps mixing and absorbing CO2 until it's done. Since the ale has to age anyway, nothing you to to speed up carbonation changes when you can drink it. You're really making this about ten times as difficult as it is.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-05-2006, 04:53 PM   #7
Ol' Grog
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Chickasha, OK.
Posts: 1,037
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I know.... and I REALLY appreciate you guys!!!! I don't think I could be doing this without you.....I know for a fact I went kegging after reading all those pros about it. I guess I'm trying to become "one" with the brew. Understanding the process. Like my brew notes. From my first brew up till now, I don't take as much notes anymore because now I know and it's second nature almost. I'm a lot more confident that I ever was in the beginning.

__________________
Ol' Grog is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2006, 04:16 PM   #8
God Emporer BillyBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
God Emporer BillyBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Melnibone
Posts: 1,519
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
If you pressurize to the chart pressure (and leave it alone) it will be fine in about a week. As the ale absorbs CO2, more CO2 bleeds into the keg. The ale keeps mixing and absorbing CO2 until it's done. Since the ale has to age anyway, nothing you to to speed up carbonation changes when you can drink it. You're really making this about ten times as difficult as it is.
I think you can save a few days by shaking.

My theory on this is that the aging that you need doesn't happen until you get at least some of the CO2 into the beer. I've read on this forum that the CO2 interacts with the beer which is where the flavor from aging comes from. Also, that it ages better at room temp. I figure you should at least get that process started.

I hook it up, pressurize to about 30 lbs, shake the heck out of it and refrigerate still at 30 lbs. Then come in the next night, shake it again, make sure it's at 30 lbs and pull it out of the fridge. Let it set for about a week and a half and its carbed and tasting pretty good.

It's been working pretty good for me.
__________________

---------------------------------------------------
Desert Planet Brewing Co.

Primary :Bloody Nose Porter
Primary 2: Bloody Nose Porter
Secondary: Blackberry Melomel
Secondary 2:air
Bottled : 14 Pound Hammer Cider, Punkin Ale, know ale, Domino wheat
Keg 1: **** Inside Her
Keg 2: IPA
Keg 3: one on a weeknight, two on a weekend IIPA
Future : Ginger Cream Ale,

God Emporer BillyBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2006, 04:26 PM   #9
dougjones31
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 351
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I would skip the one night in the fridge if I were you. No good comes from it. Pump it up to 30 lbs and store it at room temp if you want to......needless hot to cold cycles are to be avoided.

Or.....store it cold.....it ages just a little slower....it will take 3 -5 days lnoger to age......but it also lasts longer.

__________________

dougjones31 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-06-2006, 05:22 PM   #10
Ol' Grog
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Chickasha, OK.
Posts: 1,037
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

OK, let's discuss...full detail.
This was my rationale for kegging now without a cooler. Since we bottle at room temperature, I was just looking at the keg as one big bottle. It made more sense to me about letting it age at room temperatures as this has been discussed numerous times. The brew gets better with time. I currently have the keg in the garage, about mid 60's throughout the day, at about 17 psi. I started off at 30 psi and shook it up some. I dropped it to 17 about 3 hours later and there it sits since yesterday morning. I know beer will absorb more CO2 when it's cold, but how will I know or what do I do to determine if it has absorbed enough CO2 at those temperatures? The charts call for it to be around 20 or so psi. How long? Is there any way in telling? I'm still confused on this part. When it comes time to tap it, Friday night, I don't know how I'm going to chill it. I had originally thought about pouring it into a sealable jug, and then sticking it in the freezer for about 45 minutes. When I'm done pouring, I need to crank the CO2 back up, right? I mean, don't store it at 1 to 2 psi, correct????
So, in order to age, I can age it at room temperature, even though CO2 won't readily absorb into the beer. See? That's the confusion part......I have to have it cold to absorb the CO2, but it ages better at room temperature....where or where is the happy medium? If I keep it at 17 psi, will it still be good to go say 6 days later? Or does it have to be at that exact pressure setting formulated for the existing ambient temperature???? I know, I'm probably putting more into this than I should be, but I'm a pessimist by nature........if the glass is half empty....FILL IT UP!!!!!

__________________

Ol' Grog is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I think I kegged too soon... macabra11 Bottling/Kegging 8 06-12-2009 08:26 PM
1st AG Kegged! Battery_BreweryNJ All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 02-09-2009 04:48 PM
Kegged too soon! rcrabb22 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 09-27-2008 02:45 PM
Kegged my first..... mawa Bottling/Kegging 3 08-01-2008 01:11 PM
Kegged my first AG Hops-4-Life All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 03-10-2007 05:48 PM