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-   -   I've been doing it wrong... (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f37/ive-been-doing-wrong-373130/)

Husher 12-10-2012 12:47 AM

I've been doing it wrong...
 
First I'll start by saying my HB shop doesn't offer advice unless you brew in their house with their process. I use them to buy malt only. And I buy the brew kits at a wine shop, who ask ME questions on how to use the kit. Google (and this site) have been helpful.

I've been brewing with coopers kits and other brands and was under the false impression that brewing sugar was just dextrose. It's actually 20% maltodextrin. Brew enhancers have a greater percent of maltodextrin.

Point is, I was making cans with just a kilo of dextrose, and it was thin. I was told at some point to add half a kilo of dextrose and the half LME, and it was better.

Then later someone else told me that was wrong and to just replace the dextrose with LME, and I had my first good beer. And this week I discover maltodextrin...

So here's my long winded question: If I replace all the dextrose on a kit with LME, do I need the malto-dextrin? Or will the non fermentable part of the LME provide more body anyways?

Or can I use it with dextrose in varying quantities to replace LME (if I want a less malty tasting beer?)

I discovered where to buy it and today I added it when bottling a can kit that previously used half a kilo of dextrose, and half a kilo of LME. I added 4 Oz, and I'm sure it'll be ok, but next time I'll use just LME, and I want to know if I should add some Maltodextrin.

Thanks

MalFet 12-10-2012 02:42 AM

It depends on your recipe and preferences. Most beers don't need maltodextrin additions, but if you like really heavy mouthfeel you can certainly go that route. Certainly the majority of extract beers brewed by people here are done with straight extract.

unionrdr 12-10-2012 12:47 PM

Ok,first of all,brewing sugar is just that,straight dextrose. Cooper's Brew Enhancer one is 80% dextrose,20% maltodextrin. Cooper's brew enhancer 2 is like 60% dextrose,20% maltodextrin,& 20% plain light DME. Cooper's also has pure plain light DME too. All are 500g boxes,454g being one pound.
Extra LME is better,I think,then the brew enhancers. plain DME is even better,since it's not effected as easilly by mailard reactions that give that twang & darker color.

ludomonster 12-10-2012 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unionrdr (Post 4667679)
Extra LME is better,I think,then the brew enhancers. plain DME is even better,since it's not effected as easilly by mailard reactions that give that twang & darker color.

There are pros and cons to using LME or DME. I wouldn't go so far as to say that one is definitely better than the other. It largely depends on your process and your preferences. You can make great beers with either.

unionrdr 12-10-2012 01:17 PM

My main point is that DME doesn't darken as quickly as LME does in the boil. Less chance of twang or darker color.

Husher 12-11-2012 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unionrdr (Post 4667679)
Ok,first of all,brewing sugar is just that,straight dextrose. Cooper's Brew Enhancer one is 80% dextrose,20% maltodextrin.

Not according to Coopers website. The following excerpts was copied from their site;

Coopers Brewing Sugar contains dextrose and maltodextrin. The dextrose will ferment out completely. The maltodextrin is not fermentable and remains in the brew adding to the body and head retention whilst not imparting any sweetness or flavours.

The consensus on other posts is that the amount is 20%.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/coop...hancer-251931/

motobrewer 12-11-2012 01:58 PM

this is the second post recently that mentions "brewing sugar".

i've been brewing for a few years and never heard the term.

unionrdr 12-11-2012 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Husher (Post 4671271)
Not according to Coopers website. The following excerpts was copied from their site;

Coopers Brewing Sugar contains dextrose and maltodextrin. The dextrose will ferment out completely. The maltodextrin is not fermentable and remains in the brew adding to the body and head retention whilst not imparting any sweetness or flavours.

The consensus on other posts is that the amount is 20%.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/coop...hancer-251931/

Maybe they changed their terminolgy or packaging. Because when I was using them last year,BE1 was 80% dextrose,& 20%maltodextrin.
I'm looking at the site for their North american destributor,& they list: BE1-dextrose & maltodextrin,BE2-dextrose,maltodextrin,& light DME,Light DME,& plain dextrose. I do seem to remember getting the brewing sugar once. But it isn't listed on this site under "fermentables". http://us.diybeer.com/category_s/1829.htm

Husher 12-12-2012 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by motobrewer (Post 4671285)
this is the second post recently that mentions "brewing sugar". I've been brewing for a few years and never heard the term.

What have you been brewing? Coopers kits use their own 'brewing sugar', while I havent' heard of any other kits using anything other than dextrose/sugar or maltodextrin. And if you're not doing kits - forget about it. I believe it's just a term coopers came up with for a brew enhancer-ish product they sell.

unionrdr 12-12-2012 04:06 PM

Seems to me I got the "brewing sugar" with the beer kit that came with my Cooper's micro brew kit. They no longer list brewing sugar for sale on their NA site I gave the link to above.


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