New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermeneter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > Issues with Midwest Supplies Extract kits?




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-29-2010, 03:10 PM   #11
SevenFields
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Topeka, KS
Posts: 743
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I used a few Midwest kits when I first started brewing and they turned out great.
Hanks Hefe & the HopHead IPA were awsome.
I stopped using them, but only because they never add any new kits!



__________________

Tap 1: DFH Pumpkin
Tap 2: Amber
Primary 1: Nut Brown Ale
Primary 2:
Secondary: Imperial Pumpkin
Bottled: American Barleywine
On Deck: Pecan Brown Ale

SevenFields is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-29-2010, 06:05 PM   #12
mtyrrell
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Pgh, PA, USA
Posts: 5
Default

I've used two of their kits: Ferocious and the California Steam Ale. Both have turned out really great.



__________________
mtyrrell is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-29-2010, 06:40 PM   #13
TheBroonery
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Gaithersburg, MD
Posts: 370
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I've had great results with all the midwest kits (Java Stout, Porter, Apple Ale, Liberty Cream Ale. Currently fermenting Big Ben Pale Ale, Copper Ale, and Oktoberfest Lager). The Java Stout and Porter were pretty similar tasting, but the others have been great!

__________________
TheBroonery is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-29-2010, 10:23 PM   #14
Brad
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Superior WI
Posts: 73
Default

My process and recipes are under a few other posts. First AG Batch, and Everythings Bitter. Im not blaming the kit just anyone I Have talked to has not been able to pinpoint it down. And I am getting frustrated. I upgrade my yeasts to the wyeast. I just recently brewed there belgian wit and it has a funkey taste like I got when I brewed there Happy holiday ale. Both with the upgraded yeast. I first easyclean everthing, scrub, then I star san everthing so I doubt its my cleaning process. Then I follow the kits instructions step by step. Then I let it ferment the Belgian wit I went till the fg stayed the same for three days. I don't bottle I put it in a keg so I let it sit till carbed and then wait a week or two to settle. It was when i took a taste test I was dissapointed. None of my beers taste like beer like the homebrew or like the microbrew taste to it. They taste just off and not really like beer. Don't know what to do

__________________
Brad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-30-2010, 02:42 AM   #15
northman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Two Harbors, MN
Posts: 21
Default

I guess I can't speak for those kits as I have never tried em. just did an Irish stout tonight, and even unfinished it tasted good. I almost always use dry yeast but I make up a 1 liter starter. I always hear people complain about muntons but can't say I've ever had a bad batch.

__________________
northman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-30-2010, 04:08 AM   #16
gfd622
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 52
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Sorry, I don't mean to offend as I am also rather new at this process, but is it possible it's the kegging. I don't know that process at all since I simply bottle everything but it seems to me that funky tastes can come from the bottling end as well (beyond the brewing). Can you bottle a 6pack or so from your next batch (before kegging) and compare those (or is that crazy)?

Good luck

__________________
gfd622 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-30-2010, 04:22 AM   #17
Rocky71
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Iowa
Posts: 109
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I've only bottled and drank 2 MW kits but both were spot on. I have 3 kits in fermentors right at this moment (bottling Liberty Cream Ale tomorrow) along with a mead and a couple more stock piled to brew. So far things have been good. I used Mutton's in an Amber Ale and it was awesome. But since I have switched to all White Labs Vials. Maybe your just fermenting at to high of temps? You could always try a NB kit and see what happens.

__________________
Rocky71 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-30-2010, 04:29 AM   #18
jeffmeh
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jeffmeh's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,742
Liked 123 Times on 105 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
My process and recipes are under a few other posts. First AG Batch, and Everythings Bitter. Im not blaming the kit just anyone I Have talked to has not been able to pinpoint it down. And I am getting frustrated. I upgrade my yeasts to the wyeast. I just recently brewed there belgian wit and it has a funkey taste like I got when I brewed there Happy holiday ale. Both with the upgraded yeast. I first easyclean everthing, scrub, then I star san everthing so I doubt its my cleaning process. Then I follow the kits instructions step by step. Then I let it ferment the Belgian wit I went till the fg stayed the same for three days. I don't bottle I put it in a keg so I let it sit till carbed and then wait a week or two to settle. It was when i took a taste test I was dissapointed. None of my beers taste like beer like the homebrew or like the microbrew taste to it. They taste just off and not really like beer. Don't know what to do
What was your fermentation temperature, and how long did you leave it in the primary before racking to the keg? Did you make a starter for the liquid yeast?
__________________
jeffmeh is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-30-2010, 09:58 PM   #19
Brad
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Superior WI
Posts: 73
Default

Starters IMO are a waste of time I have never had a problem with fermentation starting, finishing, or even having problems with stuck fermentation so I don't waste my time and risk getting an infection due to the yeast being in a bottle. Just right out of the package is the way I go. My fermentation temperatures stay right at 68 degrees in my basement. And that is where they stay. I leave it in the primary until it is done fermenting depending on the kit and how long the yeast take to do what they do. Anywhere from one week to four weeks. My first AG I left for longer than I should almost 3 months just due to not having time but it still turned out drinkable.

__________________
Brad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-30-2010, 10:17 PM   #20
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,780
Liked 2657 Times on 1602 Posts
Likes Given: 3445

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad View Post
Starters IMO are a waste of time I have never had a problem with fermentation starting, finishing, or even having problems with stuck fermentation so I don't waste my time and risk getting an infection due to the yeast being in a bottle. Just right out of the package is the way I go. My fermentation temperatures stay right at 68 degrees in my basement. And that is where they stay. .
Well Brad, that's probably a good indication of why you're having issues with your beers tasting like crap, IMHO.

It's really a good idea to make starters when using ANY liguid yeast for all beers above 1.020 OG...

The biggest reason I suggest folks make a starter is if you make one you'll have peace of mind.

And you won't be starting an "is my yeast dead" thread in a couple of days.

Making a starter first insures that your yeast is still alive and viable before you dump it in your beer. You will be less likely to start one of those "is my yeast dead?" threads that are on here every day.

You will also ensure that you have enough yeast usually the tubes and smack packs are a lot less yeast that you really should use for healthy fermentation.

Making a starter also usually means your beer will take off sooner, because the first thing that the little buggers do in the presence of wort (whether in a flask or in a fermenter) is have an orgy to reproduce enough cells to do the job...So it won't take such a long time in the fermenter since they started doing it in the flask.

Additionally it is better for the yeast to consume and reproduce incrementally rather than just dumping them into the fermenter...The yeast will be less stressed out than if you just dump them in.

Stressed out yeast can lead to a lot of off flavors...maybe even (though rare) the dreaded autolysis....Or the curse of 1.030....getting a stuck fermentation because the yeast have bit the dust.

So making a starter proves your yeast is still healthy, allows you to grow enough yeast to do the job, cuts down on lag time, and ensures that you will not get off flavors or stuck ferementations from stressed out yeast.

Also has to do with the actual pitch rates of the smack packs and tubes, and has to do with the data that Jamil Z has on his mr malty website.

I'll quote some of it, but really you should look at the stuff there;

http://www.mrmalty.com/pitching.php

Quote:
Ales & Lagers

The general consensus on pitching rates is that you want to pitch around 1 million cells of viable yeast, for every milliliter of wort, for every degree plato. A little less for an ale, a little more for a lager. George Fix states about 1.5 million for a lager and 0.75 million for an ale in his book, An Analysis of Brewing Techniques. Other literature cites a slightly higher amount. I'm going with Fix's numbers and that is what the pitching calculator uses.
The Math

If you're curious, here is the simple math to calculate the number of cells needed. For an ale, you want to pitch around 0.75 million cells of viable yeast (0.75 million for an ale, 1.5 million for a lager), for every milliliter of wort, for every degree plato.

(0.75 million) X (milliliters of wort) X (degrees Plato of the wort)

* There is about 3785 milliliters in a gallon. There are about 20,000 milliliters in 5.25 gallons.

* A degree Plato is about 1.004 of original gravity. Just divide the OG by 4 to get Plato (e.g., 1.048 is 12 degrees Plato).

So, for a 1.048 wort pitching into 5.25 gallons you need about 180 billion cells.

(750,000) X (20,000) X (12) = 180,000,000,000

As an easy to remember rough estimate, you need about 15 billion cells for each degree Plato or about 4 billion cells for each point of OG when pitching into a little over 5 gallons of wort. If you want a quick way of doing a back of the envelope estimate, that is really close to 0.75 billion cells for each point of gravity per gallon of wort. Double that to 1.5 billion for a lager.
Pitching From Tubes, Packs, or Dry Yeast

Both White Labs and Wyeast make fantastic products and you can't go wrong with either one. There are differences between their strains and each brand has pluses and minuses yet neither is better than the other across the board. Use the brand your local homebrew shop carries, if you need a way to decide.

A White Labs tube has between 70 and 120 billion cells of 100% viable yeast, depending on the yeast strain. Some cells are much larger than others and there are more or less per ml based on size. (The information on the White Labs web site stating 30 to 50 billion cells is out of date.) We can just assume there are around 100 billion very healthy yeast. You would need 2 tubes if you were pitching directly into 5.5 gallons of 1.048 wort to get the proper cell counts.

A Wyeast Activator pack (the really big ones) and the pitchable tubes have an average of 100 billion cells of 100% viable yeast. The smaller packs are around 15-18 billion cells. You would need 2 of the large packs if you were pitching directly into 5.5 gallons of 1.048 wort to get the proper cell counts. For the small packs, you'd need eleven of them!

But to make it easier he has a great pitch rate calculator http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html

And according to his numbers on his calculator, really any beer above 1.020, you should be making a starter for.

Me personally when I use liquid yeast I just make a starter. I may not be as anal as some brewers and makes sure that I have the exact cellcount for whatever gravity beer I am making, but I do make one for the above reasons I mentioned, namely peace of mid, and a reduction in lag time.

Seriously, that's one way to insure you have clean tasting beer, not to stress out or underpitch your yeast. You may find the "bothering" to make a starter will make even the less than best kit beer come out tasting great.



__________________
Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
midwest kits vs. northren brewers kits? oildude Extract Brewing 14 06-30-2010 05:03 PM
Midwest Supplies bennyd General Beer Discussion 5 03-08-2010 07:25 PM
Is there a quality difference between Brewers Best kits and Midwest kits somecallmetex Recipes/Ingredients 11 02-04-2010 05:57 AM
Shout out to Midwest Supplies dpittard General Beer Discussion 8 12-05-2009 11:14 AM
Midwest Wheat extract kits - Off flavors? somelikeithoppy Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 06-01-2009 07:54 PM



Newest Threads