Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > IIPA: To age or not to age?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-12-2010, 03:44 AM   #1
forces
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 102
Likes Given: 1

Default IIPA: To age or not to age?

My standard brewing practice of late has been to set aside 2 bottles after bottling. Try 1 at 2 weeks, try another at 3 weeks to see how the batch is coming along. At that point I usually let it age for about 1.5-2 months before touching it again

So I just tasted the first bottle of a batch of IIPA after 2 weeks of aging, and it tastes GREAT. I am kind of an IPA snob (aren't we all?) so I am rather picky about the malt/ hop balance. At 2 weeks, this has a pretty damn good balance between bitterness and maltiness, and in my experience, after aging big hoppy bitter IPAs, the bitterness tends to subside, leaving a sweet beer with a lot of hop aroma, and no bitterness.

At this point I am debating whether or not I should let this continue aging, or just start digging in before the bitterness spoils. I'm Looking for suggestions from the veterans here.

Batch info:
OG 1.095
FG 1.019
ABV ~9.5%
IBU 85
SRM 12

__________________
forces is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2010, 04:06 AM   #2
barleynhops
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Vancouver WA
Posts: 118
Default

I always like my IPA/DIPAs fresh. I typically start drafting right after I get it off the dry hops. I've don 10 gallon batches where I have the first 5 gallons right away, while the other 5 gallons age for a bit. I've got to say that there is a significant difference between the two. While both are good for different reasons, I just get more perceived bitterness and a huge hop aroma from that first keg. I prefer that over the 2nd keg, which is a bit more mellowed out.

__________________

Not all chemicals are bad. Without chemicals such as hydrogen and oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer.
-Dave Barry-

barleynhops is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2010, 04:29 AM   #3
KYB
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,566
Liked 39 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I did a IIPA, it was pretty good at first, weeks after bottling. I had a few bottles stashed away that I tried 4 months later. Wow, it was fantastic. It did not lose any hop character. Everything just blended together better I guess and it was awesome. It sucked that I only had a couple bottles left.

__________________
KYB is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2010, 04:33 AM   #4
rmseven4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lancaster, CA
Posts: 58
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

If you only plan on aging for about a month then I say go for it, a little extra conditioning would probably be good. You might not want to age a double IPA for long term but most of the ones you buy commercially are at least a couple weeks to a month old due to the time it takes the brewery to get it to distributors and then for them to get it to the stores. Hops do fade over time but a month or so shouldn't hurt...

__________________
rmseven4 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2010, 04:35 AM   #5
brrman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Indianapolis, IN, Indiana
Posts: 1,432
Liked 30 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

Its been 12 weeks in bottle and my Black IIPA is now starting to decline - its not bad by any means, but different. The hop flavor has died slightly but the bitterness has not. Luckily I have less than a dozen left and I can brew it again.

__________________
* My Bar Build
8-Paws Brewing Co.
On tap:
. SN Tumbler Clone
. Nierra Sevada
Secondary:
Primary:
. SN Tumbler Clone 10g
. Sycamore Oatmeal Porter 10g
. Nierra Sevada 10g
On Deck:
.
Kegged:
.

Being a perfectionist does not make one perfect.
brrman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2010, 07:11 AM   #6
mro77102
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 5
Default

I say set aside 2 12 oz bottles to try about 3 and 6 months down the road...

typically, i dont like IPA's aged (like most hopheads) and without knowing anything about your beer, i think it might be safe to say that this beer will be most enjoyable withing 2 months of bottling...

But, drinking your IPA at an aged state might help you to learn more about what specifically happens to the particular types of hops and malts you used. There are certainly some IIPAs that age well (Maharaja comes to mind...at least up to 18 months in my opinion), so i would not rule aging out completely. But, i would go into with an educational/experimental state of mind, so that you know for the next time what to/not to do.

Cheers

__________________
mro77102 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-13-2010, 09:18 PM   #7
forces
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 102
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mro77102 View Post
I say set aside 2 12 oz bottles to try about 3 and 6 months down the road...

typically, i dont like IPA's aged (like most hopheads) and without knowing anything about your beer, i think it might be safe to say that this beer will be most enjoyable withing 2 months of bottling...

But, drinking your IPA at an aged state might help you to learn more about what specifically happens to the particular types of hops and malts you used. There are certainly some IIPAs that age well (Maharaja comes to mind...at least up to 18 months in my opinion), so i would not rule aging out completely. But, i would go into with an educational/experimental state of mind, so that you know for the next time what to/not to do.

Cheers

Thats funny, I have a marharaja that I've been aging for abut the last 6 months, along with a few other stouts and a Mirror Mirror.

Thanks for the comments! I had a few more last night, and I noticed two things that I didn't necessarily like;
1. There was almost a hint of sourness, which I suspect is a product of drinking a very hoppy beer at such a young age.
2. Grain astringency, which I suspect is from over-steeping grains, or steeping at too high of a temp. This I am a little worried about, because As the hop character diminishes, this will become more prominent.

Based on these observations and you're comments, I will probably kill half of the batch over the next month or so, and let the other half sit around. I really don't plan on letting it condition for anymore than 3-4 months though (I'm starting to run out of space!)

Here is the recipe:


Amount Item Type % or IBU
3.00 lb Light Dry Extract (8.0 SRM) Dry Extract 21.28 %
8.00 lb Pale Liquid Extract (8.0 SRM) Extract 56.74 %
1.40 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 20L (20.0 SRM) Grain 9.93 %
0.50 lb Vienna Malt (3.5 SRM) Grain 3.55 %
0.20 lb Rye Malt (4.7 SRM) Grain 1.42 %
2.00 oz Chinook [13.00 %] (60 min) Hops 28.7 IBU
1.00 oz Citra [11.00 %] (Dry Hop 6 days) Hops -
1.50 oz Centennial [10.00 %] (Dry Hop 10 days) Hops -
2.00 oz Centennial [10.00 %] (15 min) Hops 11.0 IBU
2.00 oz Cascade [5.50 %] (15 min) Hops 6.0 IBU
1.00 oz Citra [11.00 %] (10 min) Hops 4.4 IBU
1.00 oz Centennial [10.00 %] (10 min) Hops 4.0 IBU
1.00 lb Honey (1.0 SRM) Sugar 7.09 %
5.00 gal Portland OR Water
2 Pkgs SafAle American Ale (DCL Yeast #US-05) Yeast-Ale



Beer Profile

Measured Original Gravity: 1.095 SG
Measured Final Gravity: 1.019 SG
Actual Alcohol by Vol: 9.71 %
Bitterness: 84.4 IBU
Est Color: 13.2 SRM Color: Color


I have to say that the honey was a nice touch. I was a little worried about how this would effect the flavor, but it paid off. I will deffinetly brew this again, but I will probably change the bittering hops to either Challenger or Magnum, increase the IBU's a little, and sub .75 oz of the dry hops with Citra. I think that the grain bill and adjucts are money though.
__________________
forces is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-13-2010, 09:28 PM   #8
jdc2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 127
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by forces View Post
2. Grain astringency, which I suspect is from over-steeping grains, or steeping at too high of a temp. This I am a little worried about, because As the hop character diminishes, this will become more prominent.
I've had that in some beers as well, and I used to think it was because it
was for that reason, because it's in the books. But many lagers are made
with decoction mashing, and that involves boiling the mash. So if they
are getting that astringency, maybe the protein/phenol precipitation that's
supposed to happen with lagering at 32F makes it go away. If so, maybe
if you can cool some bottles that low you can see if that cures it.
Jim
__________________
"What's that funny aftertaste?"
jdc2 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-13-2010, 09:41 PM   #9
forces
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 102
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdc2 View Post
I've had that in some beers as well, and I used to think it was because it
was for that reason, because it's in the books. But many lagers are made
with decoction mashing, and that involves boiling the mash. So if they
are getting that astringency, maybe the protein/phenol precipitation that's
supposed to happen with lagering at 32F makes it go away. If so, maybe
if you can cool some bottles that low you can see if that cures it.
Jim
I'll give it a shot. It will be a miracle if it works, because most of my beers have had this flavor (to varrying degrees) since I started using specialty grains. My guess is that the thermometer I am using (old hand-me-down meat thermometer) isn't entirely accurate.
__________________
forces is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-13-2010, 11:08 PM   #10
barleynhops
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Vancouver WA
Posts: 118
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdc2 View Post
I've had that in some beers as well, and I used to think it was because it
was for that reason, because it's in the books. But many lagers are made
with decoction mashing, and that involves boiling the mash. So if they
are getting that astringency, maybe the protein/phenol precipitation that's
supposed to happen with lagering at 32F makes it go away. If so, maybe
if you can cool some bottles that low you can see if that cures it.
Jim
Well, keep in mind that when performing a decoction mash, the grains are steeped for 30 to 45 minutes before boiling the grain. This decreases the PH, inhibiting the release of astringent tannins in the husks. Over-steeping is still possible if this PH decrease doesn't happen first. Decoction is a totally different process.
__________________

Not all chemicals are bad. Without chemicals such as hydrogen and oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer.
-Dave Barry-

barleynhops is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
IIPA help.How does this look??? sub-zero Recipes/Ingredients 10 12-17-2009 12:45 AM
IIPA help TechyDork Recipes/Ingredients 14 06-23-2009 05:32 AM
First IIPA irishod89 Recipes/Ingredients 13 06-05-2009 01:37 PM
IIPA I think MikeFlynn74 Recipes/Ingredients 23 03-08-2008 04:10 PM
8.5% Iipa TekelBira Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 08-27-2006 03:00 AM