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Old 03-21-2006, 02:35 PM   #11
greyhair
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Default Hold on to your seat.

Something like that happened to me.
I had some Laaglander DME that I used with a partial mash
(about 50% grain and 50% DME)
The FG hung in at 1.025 for about a week, which is too high for me.

I took a shot at some beano and it brought the FG down to about 1.012 after about 3 weeks. It took about 6 hours to restart.

Greyhair

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Old 03-21-2006, 02:49 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greyhair
I took a shot at some beano and it brought the FG down to about 1.012 after about 3 weeks. It took about 6 hours to restart.
what do you mean with this ?
What is beano?

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Old 03-21-2006, 03:07 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
what do you mean with this ?
What is beano?

Kai
Kai,

When the grains are mashed at higher temps, a lot of polysaccharides are created which the yeast are not able to eat.
Beano is an enzyme (available in a supermarket) that breakes down the polysaccharides into simple sugars that the yeast can eat. The result is a lower FG. The problem is that there is no mashout so the enzyme can go "wild" and reduce the FG too far making a high alchohol beer that is too thin.
All depends on what risks you want to take.

Greyhair
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Old 03-21-2006, 03:13 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greyhair
Kai,

When the grains are mashed at higher temps, a lot of polysaccharides are created which the yeast are not able to eat.
Beano is an enzyme (available in a supermarket) that breakes down the polysaccharides into simple sugars that the yeast can eat. The result is a lower FG. The problem is that there is no mashout so the enzyme can go "wild" and reduce the FG too far making a high alchohol beer that is too thin.
All depends on what risks you want to take.

Greyhair
Thanks,

I heard of people using enzymes in the fermenter.

Is your FG still dropping? I'd imagine that you should have only the limit-dextrins left at the end when everything else has been converted to maltose or glucose. If not, I wonder what is actually stopping this enzymatic reaction.

Kai
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Old 03-21-2006, 03:49 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Kaiser
Thanks,

I heard of people using enzymes in the fermenter.

Is your FG still dropping? I'd imagine that you should have only the limit-dextrins left at the end when everything else has been converted to maltose or glucose. If not, I wonder what is actually stopping this enzymatic reaction.

Kai
Looks like the FG stabilized.
The C)2 production stopped and the measured FG seems to have stopped dropping too.
So It went into the bottle yesterday.
Mouth feel was still there however. So there still some dextrins left that the enzyme could not break down.

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Old 03-22-2006, 09:50 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by El Pistolero
Not that I'm doubting you, but how would you know that? Does Alexanders publish that info on a batch by batch basis?

It does make sense tho...I've had several batches lately end up way too sweet with a high FG, and I used Alexenders LME in all of them.
My LHBS got a lot of complaints, and contacted Alexander's. When I asked at the store, that's what they said.
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Old 03-22-2006, 01:37 PM   #17
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I wonder how consistent the fermentable/unfermentable ratio is with malt extract. It shouldn't be that hard if you have a well controlled process like any other commerzial brewery.

You could find out the attenuation of various MEs and then keep well and poorly attenuating MEs around and mix them to hit a specific FG.

just a thought.

Kai

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Old 03-22-2006, 01:43 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
You could find out the attenuation of various MEs and then keep well and poorly attenuating MEs around and mix them to hit a specific FG.
I think this is exactly what the Szamatulskis (sp?) do in their recipe books (Clone Brews, Beer Captured, etc). All of their extract recipes tend to call for some amount of M&F DME plus some amount of various specific brands of LME.

Oddly enough, the AG versions of their recipes all seem to call for a 150 degree mash. You would think they might vary this a little for the same reason--controlling FG. Their AG recipes don't seem to be as well thought out as the extract versions. (Maybe they figure AG brewers only need the general guidelines.)
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Old 03-22-2006, 02:02 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cweston
Oddly enough, the AG versions of their recipes all seem to call for a 150 degree mash. You would think they might vary this a little for the same reason--controlling FG. Their AG recipes don't seem to be as well thought out as the extract versions. (Maybe they figure AG brewers only need the general guidelines.)
I thought, that I noticed differences in the mash temp for the AG recipes.
But yes, hitting a desired FG is for me the high art of AG. It has a lot to do with your system. Once you have a done a frew brews with varied mash-temps and times you should be able to get into the ballpark of the desired FG.

Kai
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