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Old 03-24-2006, 03:40 AM   #1
chris workman
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Default Filter Wort or not?

I wondered if filtration of the wort upon transfer to primary affects the fermentation? I recently brewed a batch of barley wine and due to time constraints i couldnt filter it like i usually do. Will the extra sediment and hops affect my fermentation too much? Im kind of worried because i have to pitch two separate yeasts...will this affect when i pitch my second yeast?



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Old 03-24-2006, 03:02 PM   #2
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I think not filtering the wort will only do good to your fermentation 'cause sediment will have additional yast nutrients. It won't probably add to clarity of your beer though. But if you don't try to make really light beer - I think it should be fine.



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Old 03-24-2006, 04:24 PM   #3
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I would rake the barlywine before adding the second yeast. Other than that, there shouldn't be any problem.

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Old 03-24-2006, 04:35 PM   #4
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Default response to comments Filter or not

thanks for the timely responses. To find more information i opened a resource that i forgot i even had to research more on this. In charlie papazian's book joy of homebrewing there are a couple of refrences to leaving the trub in the fermenter. He says "in theory the trub will inhibit fermentation and reduce the production of esters (often desirable in beer)...in practice the effect on fermentation is not significant to the homebrewer."
Im thinking an interesting experiment will be to brew my same recipe and filter the crap out and see how it affects things such as lag time, fermentation time, ABV etc.

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Old 03-24-2006, 08:18 PM   #5
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I have actually never filtered. Always racked. It has always given me a good result however I tend to enjoy darker beers or wheat (which stlywize are hazy to begin with).

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Old 03-24-2006, 10:27 PM   #6
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awsome thanks for the feed back. How hazy does your beer turn out, out of the bottle?

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Old 03-24-2006, 10:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris workman
awsome thanks for the feed back. How hazy does your beer turn out, out of the bottle?
If your talking about wheat, it could look darnright possesed if you dont know that many wheats are brewed to look that way. Many pour the yeast in the glass and all...I usually dont do that though.
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Old 03-24-2006, 10:35 PM   #8
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You know I do have to make sure of something. A few commercial wheats do not look hazy, most I have tried do though. I was wondering.... are the clear ones American wheats or something?

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Old 03-24-2006, 10:38 PM   #9
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yeah. Im not extremely familiar with wheats except for hefeweizens and theyre unfiltered anyway. But i know what you mean about wheat beers. I just meant does the clarity of the finished product change due to the fact that the wort was not filtered? Or does racking take care of these issues enough that it isnt a problem?...

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Old 03-24-2006, 10:43 PM   #10
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Default wheat beers

To answer your question:
"Hefeweizen, is a variety of wheat beer in which the yeast is not filtered out. Though Kristallweizen (clear), Dunkelweizen (dark) and Weizenstarkbier (higher alcohol content) varieties are available, they are not considered true hefeweizen unless left unfiltered. The filtration which takes the yeast out of Kristallweizen also strips the wheat proteins which make Hefeweizen cloudy."
So i think the cloudy characteristics of most wheat beers are due to the fact that they are unfiltered. I dont think its whether it's american or not...its just based on whether the beer has been filtered or not.....hope this answers your question.



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