Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Extract Brewing (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f37/)
-   -   fermentation hasn't started yet? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f37/fermentation-hasnt-started-yet-4783/)

AllHoppedUp 01-07-2006 02:26 AM

fermentation hasn't started yet?
 
Okay, I just posted this to the Midwest forum as well so apologies in advance - but I need a little help. I brewed a hefe last night and 24 hours later no airlock movement. I know the temp was well below 80* when I pitched. Can it be too low? Temp in the room where it is sitting is 63-64 degrees. Pretty sure sanitation is not an issue. What to do? Warm bath? Move to warmer room? Hope I can save this sucker . . . thanks all! Oh - and yes I aerated well.

AHU

Genghis77 01-07-2006 02:30 AM

Warm it up to 68 and give it some more time. If it doesn't show activity in 72 hours, repitch.

AllHoppedUp 01-07-2006 05:16 AM

:o Okay - sorry dudes. Guess I jumped the gun. Two hours ago I sat and watched that airlock for a good minute without even the slightest movement. Now it's bubbling its little heart out. I didn't touch anything. Just looked at it. Now it's fermenting. Maybe I willed it happen . . .

Anyway, sorry for the freak out. Never happened to me before.

AHU

AllHoppedUp 01-07-2006 05:19 AM

I guess this poses a good question though. How long should one wait without airlock movement before he really should freak out?

AHU

bleppek 01-07-2006 06:27 AM

So unlike a watched pot that never boils, and watched carboy will ferment!
:D

david_42 01-07-2006 02:31 PM

72 hours is a good rule at 65F. I like to keep my ales around 75F until the yeast are done growing and the bubbling starts.

Mikey 01-07-2006 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllHoppedUp
I guess this poses a good question though. How long should one wait without airlock movement before he really should freak out?

AHU

Bubbling of an airlock is dependant on having a perfect seal on the fermenter, something that doesn't always happen. I use other clues such as the formation of a krausen, decrease in SG, temperature rise, etc.
To answer your question, I don't even think twice about a 72 hour lagtime- if I'm using a dry yeast that has not been proofed.

DeRoux's Broux 01-07-2006 06:07 PM

agree w/ David 42...72 hoursis crunch time.

the yeast was probably a little chilly asnd needed a warm up. it's always better to be at the lower end of the yeast strain ferm temp though. it'll work out great!

DragonTail 01-08-2006 04:03 PM

A starter can always help with lag time. This way the yeast is "awake" and ready to "work". I use liquid yeast and still make a starter 95% of the time.

DeRoux's Broux 01-08-2006 04:06 PM

good point DragonTail! i'm suprised that wasn't brought up already. :~)


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:58 PM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.