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Old 09-13-2010, 04:57 PM   #21
headfullahops
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chask31 View Post
The pils is all that North Country Malt had in stock at the time I ordered.
Northern Brewer has some pretty good prices on DME in quantity; if you don't mind shopping online or are near St. Paul, Minnesota or Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I've been considering buying DME in bulk for a while now (I don't know why I haven't!) but, I will probably do it through my LHBS to support the local business.

Also, +1 on the light DME and steeping specialty malts for character and color. That's what I do, too. I feel it mimics what all-grain and pro brewers do with base malts and specialty malts. 99% of my recipes are based on Pilsen or Golden Light DME and either none or some combination of specialty malts to impart some kind of malt character or color I'm trying to achieve.
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Old 09-14-2010, 01:24 AM   #22
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What kind of amber are you shooting for on this? If you are going for the west coast style of hoppy red you could try something like this:

7lbs Light DME
1lb 60L Crystal
.5lb 120L Crystal
2oz Chocolate Malt

1oz Centennial 60min
1oz Centennial 15min
1oz Cascade 10min
1oz Cascade @ flameout

1 package Safeale US-05

If you aren't doing a full boil you should really consider doing a late extract addition. Start the boil with 3lbs of DME and with 15 minutes left turn off the heat and stir in the rest. Doing this helps to prevent caramelization and increases hop extraction.

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Old 09-14-2010, 01:38 AM   #23
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Quote:
7lbs Light DME
1lb 60L Crystal
.5lb 120L Crystal
2oz Chocolate Malt

1oz Centennial 60min
1oz Centennial 15min
1oz Cascade 10min
1oz Cascade @ flameout
See, now that to me sounds like a pale ale recipe. Granted, a delicious beer, but not an amber ale here in Michigan.
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Old 09-14-2010, 02:20 AM   #24
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If it was an all grain recipe I probably would've used Munich malt as a base malt making it much maltier. As an extract beer there really isn't a good substitute for it unless you can get Munich LME. Amber DME never ferments out fully and leaves beers too sweet for my palate.

You are correct in that it isn't too far removed from a pale ale but that is the way the west coast style is. They make their beers dry and hoppy out there. Check out Green Flash Hop Head Red to see what I mean. There is usually a touch more crystal malt character and a touch of biscuit or roast character but really it is just a darker vehicle to use as a hop delivery machine.

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Old 09-14-2010, 02:28 AM   #25
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Not sure about the Pilsener, technically it should be pale. Use roasted barley, not smoked.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/ind...erican_Red_Ale

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Old 09-14-2010, 01:33 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afireinside6 View Post
You are correct in that it isn't too far removed from a pale ale but that is the way the west coast style is. They make their beers dry and hoppy out there. Check out Green Flash Hop Head Red to see what I mean. There is usually a touch more crystal malt character and a touch of biscuit or roast character but really it is just a darker vehicle to use as a hop delivery machine.
...and that's fine. I just want there to be more of distinction between my own amber and pale recipes. Besides, as I stated, here in Michigan, regionally brewed ambers are not as hoppy as pales, so that's what our palates are accustomed to. In the end, style guidelines don't matter a bit if you (and hopefully others, too!) enjoy what you've made.
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Old 09-14-2010, 03:51 PM   #27
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From the BJCP website:

PALE ALE
Aroma: Usually moderate to strong hop aroma from dry hopping or late kettle additions of American hop varieties. A citrusy hop character is very common, but not required. Low to moderate maltiness supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). Fruity esters vary from moderate to none. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.
Appearance: Pale golden to deep amber. Moderately large white to off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.
Flavor: Usually a moderate to high hop flavor, often showing a citrusy American hop character (although other hop varieties may be used). Low to moderately high clean malt character supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). The balance is typically towards the late hops and bitterness, but the malt presence can be substantial. Caramel flavors are usually restrained or absent. Fruity esters can be moderate to none. Moderate to high hop bitterness with a medium to dry finish. Hop flavor and bitterness often lingers into the finish. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.
Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Carbonation moderate to high. Overall smooth finish without astringency often associated with high hopping rates.
Overall Impression: Refreshing and hoppy, yet with sufficient supporting malt.
Comments: There is some overlap in color between American pale ale and American amber ale. The American pale ale will generally be cleaner, have a less caramelly malt profile, less body, and often more finishing hops.

Amber Ale
Aroma: Low to moderate hop aroma from dry hopping or late kettle additions of American hop varieties. A citrusy hop character is common, but not required. Moderately low to moderately high maltiness balances and sometimes masks the hop presentation, and usually shows a moderate caramel character. Esters vary from moderate to none. No diacetyl.
Appearance: Amber to coppery brown in color. Moderately large off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.
Flavor: Moderate to high hop flavor from American hop varieties, which often but not always has a citrusy quality. Malt flavors are moderate to strong, and usually show an initial malty sweetness followed by a moderate caramel flavor (and sometimes other character malts in lesser amounts). Malt and hop bitterness are usually balanced and mutually supportive. Fruity esters can be moderate to none. Caramel sweetness and hop flavor/bitterness can linger somewhat into the medium to full finish. No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel: Medium to medium-full body. Carbonation moderate to high. Overall smooth finish without astringency often associated with high hopping rates. Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth.
Overall Impression: Like an American pale ale with more body, more caramel richness, and a balance more towards malt than hops (although hop rates can be significant).
Comments: Can overlap in color with American pale ales. However, American amber ales differ from American pale ales not only by being usually darker in color, but also by having more caramel flavor, more body, and usually being balanced more evenly between malt and bitterness. Should not have a strong chocolate or roast character that might suggest an American brown ale (although small amounts are OK).

I am, however, of the school that rules were made to be broken.

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Old 09-15-2010, 03:50 AM   #28
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Hm, the west coast amber sounds similar to my original recipe. I wound up brewing the recipe before the messages came in but there are definitely some good tips for the next time if this is too hoppy. I love hops, I just wanted to distinguish my amber from my pale.

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Old 09-15-2010, 06:10 PM   #29
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I don't understand why so much stuff is in the recipe. I wouldn't
add hops at 15min because you get too much hop flavor and
you don't want that (I think). It's also too dark for a red.

How about
.5 lb crystal 60
1 oz roasted barley
no biscuit

.65 oz centennial 9.1 for 60 min
.5 oz cascade for 5 min

SRM should be about 12.
Ray

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