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Old 01-23-2014, 05:33 PM   #11
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American Red = American Amber Ale.



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Old 01-23-2014, 05:37 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
I have a minor nitpick on your nitpick!

Reds, at least "American reds" don't need any roasted barley at all. The amber/red comes from crystal malt. Carared does impart a red hue, but I like a mix of carared and a darker crystal to give a depth of flavor. I have never used roasted barley in an American red, although once I used some in an Irish red.

What I was thinking just now was even though the OP asked for an extract batch for the mass quantity drinker, it would be MUCH cheaper (and make a great beer) to make the mass quantity drinker an AG batch. You can make 10 gallons of awesome cream ale for about $16 or so. Low hops, neutral ale yeast (dry is fine), and 20% flaked rice or corn (or grits or whatever) with some base malt= big favorite drinker and much cheaper than an extract batch. I bought some Uncle Ben's Rice from the Dollar Store for my last batch, but popcorn or flaked maize or instant grits would work great as well and it's a cheap adjunct that makes the beer extremely quaffable.

My dad never liked any of my "homebrewed ****" (that's what he called it even to my face!) but he loved my cream ale and he'd down that in a big quantity. It's cheap, easy, and light beer drinkers love it.
I was thinking that American Reds often (maybe even usually) don't have roasted barley, or that "crunchy" roast flavor (which is what I like about Irish Red!). But they do often have a big hop nose, which might be too much for mass appeal. But still, a malty, lightly hopped red w/o roast barley is still good! It's kind of in line with a mild.

Do you need to mash long when you're using minute rice or non-flaked grains? Or cook the rice first to gelatinize?

When you say popcorn, you mean popped or the kernels? It has to be ground then?


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Old 01-23-2014, 08:46 PM   #13
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I was thinking that American Reds often (maybe even usually) don't have roasted barley, or that "crunchy" roast flavor (which is what I like about Irish Red!). But they do often have a big hop nose, which might be too much for mass appeal. But still, a malty, lightly hopped red w/o roast barley is still good! It's kind of in line with a mild.

Do you need to mash long when you're using minute rice or non-flaked grains? Or cook the rice first to gelatinize?

When you say popcorn, you mean popped or the kernels? It has to be ground then?
Often, American reds are well hopped but not always. Ambers (also known as "reds") like Fat Tire are not hopped heavily. American reds are in BJCP category 10A, also known as American Ambers. Rich in caramel flavor, but not roast, many people like them as a gateway to craft beer

I like to mash "low and long" with adjuncts, but if they aren't flaked or pregelatinized, a cereal mash is needed (or cook the rice or corn). Popped corn is what I mean by "popcorn". I've only done it once, but I know a few others have done it when out of flaked maize and it works out well.

The reason for a long and low mash is so that the finish is dry. Often, my cream ale will finish at 1.007 or 1.008. That gives it it's crisp, lager-like finish with a thin body, more like non-craft beer drinkers are accustomed to (ie "not heavy"). A longer mash, 75-90 minutes, is needed at a temperature of 147-149 to ensure conversion.
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Old 01-23-2014, 09:50 PM   #14
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Hey all,

Thanks for all the great input, Yooper I'm just hesitant to do a mass quantity drinker (that I would make often) because at times its hard for me to find the time to do an extract batch. But I can certainly try to make an AG batch, although I am very new to AG so what would be the quantities of grain, hops, and rest times and such. Ok I just looked at the posts again and got some of that info

As far the extract goes I do have some to use up so I might try that dirty blonde recipe (because my most, not all, of my buddies were practically raised on bud light and busch light and the like) so a lighter beer would probably disappear faster. Since I certainly could drink all my beer, its good to have the help, the faster it goes the more I can brew

Thanks for all the help so far posters, I think this forum might be creating a monster, SWMBO would probably ban me from the internet if she saw this site

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Old 01-24-2014, 11:26 AM   #15
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I'll second kombat's suggestion. The extract version of Biermuncher's Centennial Blonde that I brewed for a christmas party was a HUGE hit among the BMC drinkers. And a 5g batch costs about as much as a 6pack of 'craft' beer. Just search the forums for 'Centennial Blonde'.



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