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Old 08-30-2012, 07:40 PM   #1
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Default Brewhouse Pilsner : To bottle or not?

Hello,
Im in the midst of brewing my first ever batch of beer. I decided to go with a pre-made wort kit, as I already had wine equipment, and the process seems very similar. I had been following the instructions included, and only left it in the primary for about one week before moving it to a carboy. Its been sitting in the carboy for 2 weeks, and I'm currently sitting at a SG of about 1.019. Im wondering whether I should bottle it, or leave it for another week or so?

I lost the instructions (cant find them online, but have emailed the company). When priming the batch prior to bottling, do I simply rack into another container, add the dextrose, and stir?

Getting excited to bottle it, so that I can give it a try!


Thanks!

-Chris

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Old 08-30-2012, 07:53 PM   #2
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You should dissolve the sugar in water and boil it and then add it to the bottling bucket. Then rack on top of that. make sure everything that touches the beer at this point on is sanitized! Don't stir or rack roughly! The idea is to prevent oxygen from dissolving into the beer.
Congrats on the first batch!!!

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Old 08-31-2012, 10:54 AM   #3
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You really don't have to dissolve the sugar in water, but it won't hurt to do so. You could draw off some wort and dissolve it in the wort and add it back. rs3902 is absolutely correct about the stir or rough racking, as you don't want to add oxygen at this critical stage. Yor final gravity appears to be about right. If unsure, watch your hydrometer for a couple days. If it doesn't change, go for it! I have brewed many a Brewhouse kit. You should try Festa as well - no need to add any water, but it does not come with any dextrose for bottling so Bulk Barn is the place. I generally keg mine, but am going to bottle condition a batch in the near future. I am moving east and taking a truck load of Brewhouse and Festa with me, as I won't have time to brew them up here. I also want to make sure I don't run out before locating a supplier. I have instructions and hacks for Brewhouse, so if you want to email me, I can send them to you in PDF format. Also, congrats on your first!

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Old 08-31-2012, 12:29 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cstacey44 View Post
Hello,
Im in the midst of brewing my first ever batch of beer. I decided to go with a pre-made wort kit, as I already had wine equipment, and the process seems very similar. I had been following the instructions included, and only left it in the primary for about one week before moving it to a carboy. Its been sitting in the carboy for 2 weeks, and I'm currently sitting at a SG of about 1.019. Im wondering whether I should bottle it, or leave it for another week or so?

I lost the instructions (cant find them online, but have emailed the company). When priming the batch prior to bottling, do I simply rack into another container, add the dextrose, and stir?

Getting excited to bottle it, so that I can give it a try!


Thanks!

-Chris
http://http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/bottling-tips-homebrewer-94812/

Read this sticky!

As for your FG, did you verify it BEFORE racking to secondary, kit instructions are notorious for bad instructions. You never rack a beer off the yeast before verifying FG with two stable readings. That being said there is also the "dreaded 1.020" meaning there is a chance with extract beer to not drop below this reading for really no apparent reason.

If the beer has been sitting at this FG for more than several days it's done and you can bottle, the sticky referenced will provide you the proper instructions to ensure you do it correctly and that your beer carbonates and conditions the way it should and what to expect.

Cheers on your first batch!
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Old 08-31-2012, 12:42 PM   #5
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Thanks for all the tips. I (stupidly) did not verify the SG before racking into the carboy. At that point, I was following the instructions and just racked after 7 days. Luckily I found this forum, or else I probably would have only left it in the carboy for 7 days as well Im going to check the SG again this weekend to see if its moving.


@elreplica : I discovered festa brew thorugh these forums, and just started brewing a Stout & a Red-Ale (this is already an addictive hobby), do you have any other suggestions? Im not sure how far 'East' you are moving, but if its Ottawa, they have Festa at the 'hop and vine' in the East end: http://www.hopnvine.com/beer_products.htm

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Old 08-31-2012, 06:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
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As for your FG, did you verify it BEFORE racking to secondary, kit instructions are notorious for bad instructions. You never rack a beer off the yeast before verifying FG with two stable readings.
Never say never! I generally only take one reading to confirm that the SG is reasonable prior to racking. Unless it's grossly high, I don't think there's a whole lot to be gained from checking again---if there's just a little more fermentation to be done in secondary, it'll happen there just fine. You really just want to avoid moving on with a stuck fermentation.

Note that I also couple this with a lot of patience. I rarely check less than two weeks after pitching, and it's usually 3-5 weeks. I might be more careful if I were really trying to pump the beer through the pipeline as fast as possible. But, if after 3 weeks the beer has reached something within a couple points of where I expect it, chances are very good that it's done.
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:46 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by zeg

Never say never! I generally only take one reading to confirm that the SG is reasonable prior to racking. Unless it's grossly high, I don't think there's a whole lot to be gained from checking again---if there's just a little more fermentation to be done in secondary, it'll happen there just fine. You really just want to avoid moving on with a stuck fermentation.

Note that I also couple this with a lot of patience. I rarely check less than two weeks after pitching, and it's usually 3-5 weeks. I might be more careful if I were really trying to pump the beer through the pipeline as fast as possible. But, if after 3 weeks the beer has reached something within a couple points of where I expect it, chances are very good that it's done.
I really don't agree but you prefaced your come ya by stating you are patient and allow your beer anywhere from 2-5 weeks before doing anything.

Since this is the beginners/extract forum and we are generally assisting impatient noobs with no or very little understanding about the effects of incomplete fermentation I don't think that advise should be recommended here.

IMO I think best practice should be preached and as they become more experienced they can handle their own evaluations better.
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Old 09-01-2012, 03:06 AM   #8
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Try festas pale ale, and when it comes out in the fall the west coast ipa. The ipa is incredible, as for their stout I have one bottle left I'm saving for christmas, it was delicious.

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Old 09-01-2012, 04:20 AM   #9
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IMO I think best practice should be preached and as they become more experienced they can handle their own evaluations better.
That's fair enough, but I believe patience is the best practice.

Reading a hydrometer with the accuracy needed to reliably catch the end of fermentation is a rather advanced skill. Plenty of advanced brewers read them incorrectly, forget temperature compensation, etc.

Plus, a fermentation that's stuck at, say, 1.016 is going to read 1.016 a week later, so you aren't going to detect this by looking at the hydrometer no matter how many times or how accurately you read it. You still just have to decide, based on the expected end point, whether you think it's actually complete.

Finally, drawing samples is an opportunity for infections. Thieves and turkey basters are among the trickier implements to thoroughly clean and sanitize, so I think this particular act is a relatively high risk operation.

So, I do agree that measuring is the only way to be sure that fermentation has stopped, and I won't argue that it's good to know. But I think relying on this procedure is a more, not less, advanced technique. Keep it simple and reliable early on. Most noob brewers would produce better beers simply by waiting. When they get more advanced, they can consider trying to speed up the process.

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Old 09-01-2012, 05:00 AM   #10
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Just measured SG, and it has dropped to 1.018. Going to wait until Monday before checking it again and potentially bottling

Thanks for.the help

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