*Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway - Enter Now!*

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > Brewferm Diablo -- Questions
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-21-2008, 07:01 PM   #1
dismantle360
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 60
Default Brewferm Diablo -- Questions

Well here goes my first posting.

I have done some reading and somewhat have an answer but figured I would ask around to get a consensus.

First has anyone tried this and whats it suppose to taste like (ie is there a commercially available beer out there like this.)?

Second I am thinking about boiling this but not sure if i should as I read that it can get rid of the hop aroma and fruit flavors (reason i asked the first question)?


Third I am trying to figure out if what type of sugar to use and want some info on the expected results for these sugars.

Belgian Candy
Corn Sugar
Brown Sugar
Table Sugar

__________________
dismantle360 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2008, 07:47 PM   #2
MikeFlynn74
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
MikeFlynn74's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: ANCHORAGE!!
Posts: 3,891
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts

Default

tried what?what exactly are you trying to do?

__________________
Quote:
If you find yourself going through hell, keep going- Winston Churchill
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenchiro View Post
The successful have nobody to blame but themselves, I really wish they would take some responsibility for their own actions...
MikeFlynn74 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2008, 07:52 PM   #3
Funkenjaeger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Funkenjaeger's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 1,637
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts

Default

If you're going with a no-boil pre-hopped canned extract kit, especially one with added sugar, it's probably best if you don't try to make direct comparisons with commercial beers. You'll almost certainly learn a lot and come out with drinkable beer, and you'll probably enjoy it greatly because you made it yourself, but it will probably be nothing spectactular as compared to a commercial example - I know my first batch wasn't. You would do much better to go with a recipe using unhopped extract, separate hops, no added sugar, and perhaps some steeping grains.

Also, it seems that the kit you mention is intended for making a high-gravity beer (8%ABV) - just as a word of warning, brewing higher-gravity beers is exponentially harder than lower-gravity ones because of all the extra care it takes to keep the yeast healthy and active. For that reason, it's generally better to stick to medium- or low-gravity beers until you have more experience.

__________________
Funkenjaeger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2008, 08:01 PM   #4
dismantle360
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 60
Default

Thanks this is the 4th batch of beer im brewing and its actually a step back from the parshal mash I did from the other 3 batches.

These are cheap compaired to extract, specialty grains, hops, and yeast all seperate as well as this being a test of sorts to see if they are any good.

I plan on making a starter for the yeast as well as using pure oxygen to properly oxygenate the wort before pitching the starter.

I was wondering more if anyones tried this stuff and what it would taste like.

I was also trying to find out how fermentable the other sugars are that I mentioned in the first post and what type of flavor's I would experience with it.

Thanks and if anyone out there reads this that can answer the questions I would apprecieate it.

__________________
dismantle360 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2008, 08:55 PM   #5
Funkenjaeger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Funkenjaeger's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 1,637
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts

Default

All the sugars you mentioned are pretty much fully fermentable. In large quantities, any of them will yield a 'cidery' flavor. Corn and table sugar will give you little to no other flavor. Brown sugar, since it is just table sugar plus molasses, will give you some molasses flavor. Belgian candi sugar is basically caramelized table sugar (assuming it's one of the darker varieties), and thus may provide some unique caramelized flavor, depending of course on the color.

__________________
Funkenjaeger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2008, 09:49 PM   #6
dismantle360
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 60
Default

Thanks Funk

__________________
dismantle360 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-22-2008, 12:55 AM   #7
rocketcrab
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Lancaster Co., PA
Posts: 100
Default

For what it's worth, I recently started a batch of Brewferm Triple, using clear Belgian Candy Sugar and a White Labs Belgian Ale yeast. I was going the 9-litre route, and since I needed to add about 1lb/1KG of fermentable sugar, I figured why not go with the real thing?

__________________
rocketcrab is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-22-2008, 01:32 AM   #8
homebrewer_99
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
homebrewer_99's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Atkinson (near the Quad Cities), IL
Posts: 17,951
Liked 85 Times on 75 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

FWIW, I've had plenty of commercial Diablo's. Probably had about 50 or so in about 2 weeks once. Then a second time for a month...lost count.

They're Belgium and quite good tasting even with a higher than usual alcohol content.

I'd bet a dollar to a donut you won't get the same flavoring/color from a canned kit.

If you want to try it by all means go ahead.

Personally, I never recommend any brew to a brewer that they haven't at least tried some of the original. I just think it's counter productive. If you were/are really concerned about getting it right, if at least close, then how would you know if you haven't had any?

__________________
HB Bill
homebrewer_99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-22-2008, 02:45 AM   #9
dismantle360
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 60
Default

When you say there Belgium and quite good I'm curious what that means?

Is a Diabolo Malty, Hoppy, Bitter, Smooth, Even tones, Light, Heavy, Sour, etc..?

Also if it was one of these and there was a commercial beer that I could go out and try before brewing the kit which would you recommend?

I realize that rarely if ever will a canned kit come out in a way that a commercial beer does (heck i have yet to have a clone that was close to the original).

I'm not asking if these canned kits are the way to brew I am fully aware that they are a beginner product and if you did a specialty grain and extract mix you would probably get a better product.

Any help or additional info anyone could lend regarding the initial questions that are not answered would be appreciated.

__________________
dismantle360 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-22-2008, 03:04 AM   #10
dismantle360
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 60
Default

Never mind figured it out what the commercial examples are running to pick up a 4 pack right now.

Thanks for all the help Funk and guys have a great time brewing.

__________________
dismantle360 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lobster Fra Diablo paulthenurse Cooking & Pairing 7 08-02-2009 03:36 AM
Brewferm grains MattHollingsworth Recipes/Ingredients 2 06-16-2009 06:52 AM
Anyone used Brewferm KRIEK? homebrewjapan Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 03-27-2009 12:50 AM
Question about using Brewferm kits JamesJ Extract Brewing 3 08-25-2008 11:32 PM
brewferm question sysctl Extract Brewing 4 08-27-2006 02:44 PM