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-   -   All I taste is apples! help plz! (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f37/all-i-taste-apples-help-plz-333378/)

Timo21 06-05-2012 05:36 PM

All I taste is apples! help plz!
 
So I'm on my third batch of Coopers DIY kit, using their malt extract, the yeast that comes with it, etc... just as it comes and following the directions exactly, I have used a different style malt extract each time and every time now it comes out with STRONG notes of apples, almost so much that someone could actually mistake it for a cider and I wouldnt call them a retard. what is it that I'm doing or what do I need to add/subtract to get the flavor I am going for? where does that apple flavoring come from and how do I get rid of it?

badbrew 06-05-2012 06:37 PM

What is the temperature of the room that the fermenter sits? Is it green apple? Another thing, did you use all malt extract or did you add other sugars?

dennisjonesjr 06-05-2012 08:22 PM

Sounds like it's too hot for the yeast you are using.
Here is a link for common off flavors. It's a good read, I have it bookmarked :)

http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html

Timo21 06-06-2012 04:29 AM

I Read the link, its actually the same book I have been referring back to as I brew, great book, however I hadnt read this part, it says:

"Acetaldehyde
A flavor of green apples or freshly cut pumpkin; it is an intermediate compound in the formation of alcohol. Some yeast strains produce more than others, but generally it's presence indicates that the beer is too young and needs more time to condition."

So I understand it might suppose to be smell like that as i brew because the beer is young and hasnt matured yet but the fact that it still tastes like it even after its done fermenting and ready to bottle AND had been bottled long enough is still strange to me. As far as the temp goes, i keep my fermenters in my closet and keep a close eye on the temps, at night i blow an electric heater to keep the fermenters between 22C/26C that being night/day... As far as the sugar content goes, i did use all of the malt extract and the 1kg bag of dextrose, that was it. Do you think i should try using DME instead of the dextrose? or is the problem in the timing of everything? maybe i need to let it ferment longer and keep it bottled longer? what do you think?
Also I wonder if the yeast that comes under the lid of the liquid malt extract isnt the quality im looking for... should i try another yeast?

badbrew 06-06-2012 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Timo21 (Post 4147645)
I Read the link, its actually the same book I have been referring back to as I brew, great book, however I hadnt read this part, it says:

"Acetaldehyde
A flavor of green apples or freshly cut pumpkin; it is an intermediate compound in the formation of alcohol. Some yeast strains produce more than others, but generally it's presence indicates that the beer is too young and needs more time to condition."

So I understand it might suppose to be smell like that as i brew because the beer is young and hasnt matured yet but the fact that it still tastes like it even after its done fermenting and ready to bottle AND had been bottled long enough is still strange to me. As far as the temp goes, i keep my fermenters in my closet and keep a close eye on the temps, at night i blow an electric heater to keep the fermenters between 22C/26C that being night/day... As far as the sugar content goes, i did use all of the malt extract and the 1kg bag of dextrose, that was it. Do you think i should try using DME instead of the dextrose? or is the problem in the timing of everything? maybe i need to let it ferment longer and keep it bottled longer? what do you think?
Also I wonder if the yeast that comes under the lid of the liquid malt extract isnt the quality im looking for... should i try another yeast?

I think the biggest problem is the room temp from the heater. 22-26C is like 72-79 F. Ouch.:drunk: And I bet the real temp of the fermenter is higher, maybe well into the 80's. Turn it off on the next batch and store the fermenter in a trash can full of water to just below the beer line. That will help to keep the beer stable when it's cold and hot out. A temp getting down in the 50's is much better than a temp in the 80's with yeasts in general. Temps like you described at early fermentation ruin beer. Ask me how I know this.:rockin:

The dextrose might be contributing to the apple problem. Get the temps down to the low to mid 60's if you can first though.

dennisjonesjr 06-06-2012 02:35 PM

Farther down that link it explains more about the Cider taste being cause be heat or a bacteria :( I honestly hope it's the heat (easier to fix). Never actually used the coopers yeast. But I have also never heard of it being cidery.

Using DME instead of Dextrose will give it a stronger beer flavor so it should help.

Is the heater blowing directly on the bucket? How close is it to the bucket? overall temp might be ok but you also might have a hot spot.

smithn 06-06-2012 05:38 PM

Put a Saison label on it.

Timo21 06-08-2012 12:16 AM

Its weird because I thought the temp might be too high as well but the directions clearly say to keep it within 18-30C so thats 64-86F! now that I think about this is pretty crazy that the directions itself says that it would be "ok" to keep it around 80F for that long, does this seem strange? also the heater isnt blowing directly on it, I have it blowing so it is off to the side and just warming the entire closet really. I know the fermenter is clean because this is the first batch it has been used for since i bought it new at the store and it was sterilized thoroughly. I think I might just try a new yeast next time any suggestions?

Yooper 06-08-2012 12:18 AM

I'd suggest trying a different brand of kit- a quality kit with grains, malt extract, and quality yeast. I never made a good beer out of any Cooper's products.

Temperature control is hugely important- most ales should be kept under 70 degrees to avoid off-flavors caused by a too-high temperature fermentation.

AR-Josh 06-10-2012 06:13 PM

I would say fermentation temp. Most off flavors in beer I've made were due to high temps ~70. I didn't start getting rid of the apple flavor until I could ferment around 65. Also, if you are carbonating in the bottle, if you drink it too soon it can have that same flavor. Ferment at lower temps and give it more time. That usually will cure most ills.


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