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Old 03-30-2010, 04:01 PM   #1
boulong
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Default 1.5 gallon boil? Help a noob!

Hi All ...
This is my only my second batch so i am still a rookie brewer and would like to know how increasing the water in step one from 1.5 gallons to 3 gallons would affect the taste of the final product.

1.5 gallons seems low to me considering that i will lose some to evaporation and since my stove can easily handle a 3 gallon boil I thought it might improve the quality of beer.

I have read that the amount of hops added is based partially upon the volume of wort and since i am doubling the amount of wort it seems like hops adjustment is in order.

This is a kit and recipe is from a local homebrew supply that has been very helpful, but some independent observations on the kit or recipe would be appreciated as well.






Oatmeal Stout

Heavily roasted grains make our Oatmeal Stout impenetrably black with richness of dark chocolate and espresso. Generous additions of oats create an incredibly full-bodied beer topped with a thick, tan head.


Ingredients
7 lb. John Bull Amber Malt Extract
1 lb. M & F Dark Dry Malt Extract
½ lb. M & F Roasted Barley Malt 675° L
½ lb. M & F Black Patent Malt 471° L
½ lb. M & F Chocolate Malt 338° L
1 lb. Flaked Oats
1 oz. Phoenix Hops (Bittering)
1 oz. Willamette Hops (Finishing)
Wyeast # 1099XL Whitbread Ale Yeast


Statistics
Original Gravity 1.062
Final Gravity 1.018
Alcohol Content 5.5%

1. Divide the cracked grains and flaked oats among 5 of the muslin bags (no more than ½ pound per bag) and add them to your brew kettle along with 1½ gallons of cold water. Heat slowly.

2. Steep the grains, including the oats, in hot water (about 145° – 160°F) to extract flavor and color — do not allow to boil. After about 30 minutes, remove the grain bags and then bring the water to a boil.

3. Remove the pot from the heat and add the cans of malt extract and the bag of dry malt extract. Keep the kettle off the burner and stir until the malt extract is completely dissolved.

4. Put the pot back on the burner and bring it to a boil. Once boiling, place the bittering hops into muslin bags (no more than 1 oz. per bag), add them to the pot, and set your timer to boil for 1 hour. Keep an eye on the pot to avoid boil-overs.

5. After 45 minutes of boiling, you may add ½ teaspoon of Irish moss, or 1 Whirlfloc tablet, to help clarify your beer (optional).

6. After 58 minutes of boiling, add the finishing hops (in a muslin bag) and boil for 2 more minutes.

7. After 60 minutes of boiling, turn off the heat. Put a lid on your pot and cool it in an ice bath (use your sink) for about 30 minutes. Remove the hop bags from the kettle.

8. Pour 2 gallons of cold water into your sanitized fermenter, add the cooled wort (the stuff in your pot), and top up with additional water to 5 gallons. Aerate the wort with vigorous stirring, rocking the fermenter, etc.

9. Make sure the wort is below 80°F before adding yeast. Take a hydrometer reading if desired. Add the yeast.

10. Store the fermenter where the temperature will be a fairly constant 65° – 70°F. Active fermentation may take only a few days, or it can last up to 2 weeks. A hydrometer reading is a great way to determine when the fermentation is done. Keep it in the primary fermenter until active fermentation is complete (no signs of active fermentation for the last 2 to 3 days).

11. When ready to bottle, siphon beer into your sanitized bottling bucket, leaving sediment behind. Boil the priming sugar in 1-2 cups of water for a few minutes, gently stir into the beer, and bottle as usual.

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Old 03-30-2010, 04:10 PM   #2
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when calculating the bitterness you get from your hops use the final volume of the wort that your fermenting. if its a 5 gallon batch use 5 gallons in your calculations. the other factor that affects the bitterness is the SG of the wort your boiling. if all other factors are the same the extra water will lower your boil gravity and increase the amount of bitterness you get from your hops. this can be compensated for by decreasing the amount of hops you use, shortening their boil time, or adding more extract to raise the boil gravity back up to where it is supposed to be.

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Old 03-30-2010, 04:14 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by TipsyDragon View Post
when calculating the bitterness you get from your hops use the final volume of the wort that your fermenting. if its a 5 gallon batch use 5 gallons in your calculations. the other factor that affects the bitterness is the SG of the wort your boiling. if all other factors are the same the extra water will lower your boil gravity and increase the amount of bitterness you get from your hops. this can be compensated for by decreasing the amount of hops you use, shortening their boil time, or adding more extract to raise the boil gravity back up to where it is supposed to be.
Am i wrong in thinking that the OP just wants to heat the steeping grains in a greater quantity of water from the start? I can't see how using 3gal vs. 1.5gal just for the specialty grains would affect the end product. I'm still new myself, but it just doesn't seem like it would matter much in the end.
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Old 03-30-2010, 04:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boulong View Post
Hi All ...
This is my only my second batch so i am still a rookie brewer and would like to know how increasing the water in step one from 1.5 gallons to 3 gallons would affect the taste of the final product.

1.5 gallons seems low to me considering that i will lose some to evaporation and since my stove can easily handle a 3 gallon boil I thought it might improve the quality of beer.

I have read that the amount of hops added is based partially upon the volume of wort and since i am doubling the amount of wort it seems like hops adjustment is in order.

This is a kit and recipe is from a local homebrew supply that has been very helpful, but some independent observations on the kit or recipe would be appreciated as well.






Oatmeal Stout

Heavily roasted grains make our Oatmeal Stout impenetrably black with richness of dark chocolate and espresso. Generous additions of oats create an incredibly full-bodied beer topped with a thick, tan head.


Ingredients
7 lb. John Bull Amber Malt Extract
1 lb. M & F Dark Dry Malt Extract
½ lb. M & F Roasted Barley Malt 675° L
½ lb. M & F Black Patent Malt 471° L
½ lb. M & F Chocolate Malt 338° L
1 lb. Flaked Oats
1 oz. Phoenix Hops (Bittering)
1 oz. Willamette Hops (Finishing)
Wyeast # 1099XL Whitbread Ale Yeast


Statistics
Original Gravity 1.062
Final Gravity 1.018
Alcohol Content 5.5%

1. Divide the cracked grains and flaked oats among 5 of the muslin bags (no more than ½ pound per bag) and add them to your brew kettle along with 1½ gallons of cold water. Heat slowly.

2. Steep the grains, including the oats, in hot water (about 145° – 160°F) to extract flavor and color — do not allow to boil. After about 30 minutes, remove the grain bags and then bring the water to a boil.

3. Remove the pot from the heat and add the cans of malt extract and the bag of dry malt extract. Keep the kettle off the burner and stir until the malt extract is completely dissolved.

4. Put the pot back on the burner and bring it to a boil. Once boiling, place the bittering hops into muslin bags (no more than 1 oz. per bag), add them to the pot, and set your timer to boil for 1 hour. Keep an eye on the pot to avoid boil-overs.

5. After 45 minutes of boiling, you may add ½ teaspoon of Irish moss, or 1 Whirlfloc tablet, to help clarify your beer (optional).

6. After 58 minutes of boiling, add the finishing hops (in a muslin bag) and boil for 2 more minutes.

7. After 60 minutes of boiling, turn off the heat. Put a lid on your pot and cool it in an ice bath (use your sink) for about 30 minutes. Remove the hop bags from the kettle.

8. Pour 2 gallons of cold water into your sanitized fermenter, add the cooled wort (the stuff in your pot), and top up with additional water to 5 gallons. Aerate the wort with vigorous stirring, rocking the fermenter, etc.

9. Make sure the wort is below 80°F before adding yeast. Take a hydrometer reading if desired. Add the yeast.

10. Store the fermenter where the temperature will be a fairly constant 65° – 70°F. Active fermentation may take only a few days, or it can last up to 2 weeks. A hydrometer reading is a great way to determine when the fermentation is done. Keep it in the primary fermenter until active fermentation is complete (no signs of active fermentation for the last 2 to 3 days).

11. When ready to bottle, siphon beer into your sanitized bottling bucket, leaving sediment behind. Boil the priming sugar in 1-2 cups of water for a few minutes, gently stir into the beer, and bottle as usual.
Keystone Homebrew?
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Old 03-30-2010, 04:26 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by fineexampl View Post
Am i wrong in thinking that the OP just wants to heat the steeping grains in a greater quantity of water from the start? I can't see how using 3gal vs. 1.5gal just for the specialty grains would affect the end product. I'm still new myself, but it just doesn't seem like it would matter much in the end.
Partially correct. The enire recipe is in 1.5 gals of water and its not brought up to 5 gals until placing into the primary. The steeping of the specialty grains and also the LME and DME and hops additions are also into the 1.5 gallons. I'm more concerned about a 60 minute boil of such a small volume.
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Old 03-30-2010, 04:29 PM   #6
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Yep Keystone. Great bunch of guys IMO. They are guilty of getting me addicted to homebrewing!

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Old 03-30-2010, 04:31 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by boulong View Post
Partially correct. The enire recipe is in 1.5 gals of water and its not brought up to 5 gals until placing into the primary. The steeping of the specialty grains and also the LME and DME and hops additions are also into the 1.5 gallons. I'm more concerned about a 60 minute boil of such a small volume.
You'd be fine with that. If the end result is going to be 5gal, it won't matter at all how much water you begin with just to sterilize the LME and DME. That also answers the hop question too, i think. The hops were determined for a 5gal brew, so they are probably calculated there. If you get more bitterness from a larger boil, IMO that's not a bad thing at all, but i love a bitter brew.
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Old 03-30-2010, 04:32 PM   #8
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Yep Keystone. Great bunch of guys IMO. They are guilty of getting me addicted to homebrewing!
I bought a bunch of stuff from them. Tell me that shop isn't just WAY too small.
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Old 03-30-2010, 04:56 PM   #9
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The stout will be more bitter, because you get better utilization in a 3 gallon boil. It's big enough to handle the increase, but if you are concerned, reduce the bittering hops by 1/3.

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Old 03-30-2010, 06:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fineexampl View Post
Am i wrong in thinking that the OP just wants to heat the steeping grains in a greater quantity of water from the start? I can't see how using 3gal vs. 1.5gal just for the specialty grains would affect the end product. I'm still new myself, but it just doesn't seem like it would matter much in the end.
the OP wanted to know what a change in boil volume will do to the end product. any change in boil gravity will change the bitterness of the resulting beer.

any increase in boil volume without adding more fermentables will cause the boil gravity to drop. its this boil gravity that you use in calculating the amount of bitterness you get from hops. if the boil gravity drops the amount of bitterness you get increases. if the boil gravity goes up the amount of bitterness decreases.
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