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Old 07-04-2014, 07:56 AM   #11
skw
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How does CO2 minimize the infection risk? Lacto and Brett don't require O2, they'll infect your batch with or without CO2. CO2 is just a gas, bacteria fall through it, they don't bounce off of it.

People say the brown sludge tastes bitter and therefore they don't want it in their beer. Ever sucked on a hop pellet? Not tasty either, but we want them in our beer.

I've skimmed the brown stuff from two beers, because I intended to top crop. Didn't taste any difference to not skimming. Since in the end, it sticks to the side of the fermenter anyway, I don't see why I would want to do extra work for no benefit.

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Old 07-04-2014, 10:50 PM   #12
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There's no good reason to so I don't.

Beer making is a pretty "icky" process until the very end. You're soaking and gelatinizing grains, throwing leafy hop matter into the pot of boiling grain-water, creating a ton of proteins and coagulation and debris, putting bare copper piping into the pot to cool it down, throwing billions of living cells into the resulting sludge mixture and all of a sudden you are worried about the bubbly sludge on top? Even while the yeast are dancing in large chunks at sometimes alarming velocities?

Do what you want but I see no reason to start getting nervous about a little krausen with all the other crazy and icky stuff going on. In 2-3 weeks there is clear beer to keg and it comes out delicious without any fussing with it.

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Old 07-05-2014, 01:13 AM   #13
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This is how I fermented the last batch of brown porter. Inspired by the uk "open square" fermentors. I pitched healthy stir plate grown yeast, and overnight had a nice krausen. I skimmed the first lot. As it contains a bit if junk and trub, but after that I harvested some nice tan, creamy mousse that I can use again.

The beer has a wonderful ester profile and I'll do it again.

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Old 07-07-2014, 06:39 PM   #14
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CO2 is just a gas, bacteria fall through it, they don't bounce off of it.

If bacteria "float about" in air, rather than sink through it, and CO2 is more dense than air, then why do bacteria "fall through it"

we are getting a little off topic, my concern is the possible adverse effects of the sludge falling through the beer, but I do appreciate all answers and opinions

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Old 07-07-2014, 06:58 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobtheUKbrewer2 View Post
CO2 is just a gas, bacteria fall through it, they don't bounce off of it.

If bacteria "float about" in air, rather than sink through it, and CO2 is more dense than air, then why do bacteria "fall through it"

we are getting a little off topic, my concern is the possible adverse effects of the sludge falling through the beer, but I do appreciate all answers and opinions
because they have no way of getting in, in the first place. Normally you would have the top closed and an airlock with some sanitizer solution or vodka in the air lock. The air lock separates the air from the fermentor to the outside air. Then you have co2 being produced by the yeast that pushes out of the fermentor.

But back to the topic. Its an unnecessary process and adds some risk. I would find it very annoying if i had to skim that off a few times a day.
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