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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Will switching to AG alleviate that "homebrew" taste?
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Old 08-15-2012, 04:50 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Mikey_Dawg View Post
Does one ice bath usually keep the batch cool enough through fermentation (with room temps around 70-72)...or will I need to refresh the ice?
I freeze large-ish sized soda bottles of water, and change them out once a day. I float a thermometer in the water bath (along with a tablespoon of bleach to avoid mold growth in my cooler) and I have a homemade foam lid to insulate it.

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Old 08-15-2012, 04:58 PM   #42
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Chloramines will boil off, eventually, but you'd run out of water first! I think it's something like hours, not minutes, to boil off chloramine. I have read some sources that say it can be boiled off more readily, but sources I trust say not.
AJ Delange? I dropped his paper on this subject into my dropbox for your persusal. I was wrong about how long it took to reduce. From his experiments, it takes about 60 minutes to reduce the chloramines to less than 1% of its starting concentration. Hard to say what the "taste threshold" is for chloramines and the resulting chlorophenols, but I'd guess that 1% would be more than sufficient.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7cy2uzdsx8...T_Chlorine.pdf
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Old 08-15-2012, 05:12 PM   #43
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It absolutely will, I have made great beer using both methods but the all grain beers are more similar in quality to a micro brew, much fresher without that twang. Kegging seemed to help too, that way you can dial in your carbonation which I feel makes a big difference.

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Old 08-15-2012, 06:25 PM   #44
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I'm guessing its due to fermentation. I was in your shoes. Once I started making starters, using pure O2, and controlling fermentation temps, my beers started tasting as good as commercial beers (once and a while, better). If ambient temp is 70, then the fermentation is likely going higher than that (it produces heat) which could cause flavor issues. Switching to all-grain won't fix that.

I've had some really good beers made with extract. It is possible. I'd get your fermentation processes in check before you switch to all-grain (but then I'd switch to all grain - its super fun).

I'd say this is your number one reason for that "taste"; I'd also chime in that you want to pitch at least as cold as your ferementation temperature... "65ish"... A water batch with rotating Freezer bottles would do wonders for you as well
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Old 08-15-2012, 06:27 PM   #45
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by "homebrew" taste you mean, great tasting beer? who gets rid of that. :-)

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Old 08-15-2012, 06:29 PM   #46
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My .02
If you go through winning entries of the national Homebrew competition you will see many award winning beers made solely with extract so if all your processes are good you too can produce award winning beers with extract only or PM.

After reading through this thread I would focus on your fermentation temperatures first, cleaning and sanitizing your keg set up: by this I mean you should be taking everything apart periodically and taking care of everything! Even the towers and connections, you'll be surprised what you find Third, have your water tested and make adjustments as necessary.

In this order I think you will see a marked improvement in your final product!

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Old 08-15-2012, 06:42 PM   #47
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AJ Delange? I dropped his paper on this subject into my dropbox for your persusal. I was wrong about how long it took to reduce. From his experiments, it takes about 60 minutes to reduce the chloramines to less than 1% of its starting concentration. Hard to say what the "taste threshold" is for chloramines and the resulting chlorophenols, but I'd guess that 1% would be more than sufficient.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7cy2uzdsx8...T_Chlorine.pdf
It's WAY over my head, but I don't see where it takes 60 minutes of boiling to get to 1% of its starting concentration. I see that he broke it into half-lives, and it looks like in some cases that the boiling was for like 10 hours. I don't think it's as simple as "1 hour of boiling reduces chloramines to 1% of its start" but of course I'm not even close to understanding all of the equations!
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Old 08-15-2012, 08:47 PM   #48
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It's WAY over my head, but I don't see where it takes 60 minutes of boiling to get to 1% of its starting concentration. I see that he broke it into half-lives, and it looks like in some cases that the boiling was for like 10 hours. I don't think it's as simple as "1 hour of boiling reduces chloramines to 1% of its start" but of course I'm not even close to understanding all of the equations!


The take-away there is the half life of the chloramines, which is the time it takes for the concentration to cut in half, is between 6 and 10 minutes. This graph is from that paper, but since the Y axis was log concentration (logarithmic) I've replaced that with percentage. I also moved the time scale to start with the boil which makes more sense I think. You can see from the graph that the chloramine level is reduced below 1% after about 45 minutes of the boil. Apparently AJ's system took well over an hour to reach the boil, but that wasn't relevant to the discussion. Pretty cool data I think.

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Old 08-15-2012, 09:35 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikey_Dawg

......Probably start with a simple BIAB setup to get the ball rolling. But right now, I am building my brewing domain in my basement so I want to get that done first.
Now you're talking.. Try an AG BIAB and see what changes!
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Old 08-15-2012, 11:17 PM   #50
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Could this taste develop as the beer ages? That was my first thought when I tasted it as I simple dont recall the taste when the beer was more fresh.
If you use pellet hops, try whole hops instead. That cleared up my problem.

Ever since I've started kegging, I noticed my beer would taste great for the first couple of days, then over the course of a couple weeks would take on a harsh bite/twang. This off flavor would persist up to a month or two, after which the beer would suddenly taste fantastic. Of course, the keg would usually be nearly empty by that point.

I narrowed it down to hop particles from the pellets. Dozens of people have told me they don't have this problem. They told me to rack carefully to avoid getting hop gunk in the fermenter, ditto for keg, and to let it sit for a few days in the keg to let everything settle and then to dump the first pint or two. I've done all of these things, and none of them helped. I don't know what it is about my process that apparently makes me prone to this problem where others aren't, but switching to whole hops definitely fixed it for me.
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