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Old 06-30-2010, 03:51 PM   #11
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You don't dump your beer, for making a minor little mistake. Your beer is hardier than that.

And you don't dump something because you think it's going to turn out bad. You only dump a beer that you KNOW is bad, and you give it at least a couple of months in the bottle before you even make THAT decision.

Read theses two threads that were compiled for nervous new brewers to realize that your beers are not a weak baby that is going to die if you look at it wrong.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/what...t-great-96780/

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/neve...en-beer-73254/

Our beer is really resilient despite the boneheaded things we do to it. And even if something appears to be wrong, often time and the yeasties go along way to correct itself.

I think about it in terms of my time and money, I'm not going to dump 30 or more dollars worth of ingredients, 6 hours of brewing time, and at least 2 months from yeast pitch to cracking the first bottle, on what could be a minor mistake (that may not even harm the beer anyway,) until I have exhausted all probability that the beer won't improve. And even then that means at least walking away from the bottles for maybe 6 months or more.

And so far I have never beer wrong.

After all these years of brewing I still haven't had a dumper.

And I've made some big mistakes.

But I have never had a beer that wasn't at least palatable, after all that time.

They may have not been stellar beers, but they were still better than BMC or Skunky Beers in green bottles that people actually pay money for.

So just read those threads and next time, relax, and give your beer a chance to prove how strong it really is.

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Old 06-30-2010, 03:53 PM   #12
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The thing to remember though is that if you are smelling or tasting this during fermentation not to worry. During fermentation all manner of stinky stuff is given off (ask lager brewers about rotten egg/sulphur smells, or Apfelwein makers about "rhino farts,") like we often say, fermentation is often ugly AND stinky and PERFECTLY NORMAL.

It's really only down the line, AFTER the beer has been fermented (and often after it has bottle conditioned even,) that you concern yourself with any flavor issues if they are still there.

I think too many new brewers focus to much on this stuff too early in the beer's journey. And they panic unnecessarily.

A lot of the stuff you smell/taste initially more than likely ends up disappearing either during a long primary/primary & secondary combo, Diacetyl rests and even during bottle conditioning.

If I find a flavor/smell, I usually wait til it's been in the bottle 6 weeks before I try to "diagnose" what went wrong, that way I am sure the beer has passed any window of greenness.

Fementation is often ugly, smelly and crappy tasting in the beginning and perfectly normal. The various conditioning phases, be it long primary, secondarying, D-rests, bottle conditioning, AND LAGERING, are all part of the process where the yeast, and co2 correct a lot of the normal production of the byproducts of fermentation.

Lagering is a prime example of this. Lager yeast are prone to the production of a lot of byproducts, the most familiar one is sulphur compounds (rhino farts) but in the dark cold of the lagering process, which is at the minimum of a month (I think many homebrewers don't lager long enough) the yeast slowly consumes all those compounds which results in extremely clean tasting beers if done skillfully.

Ales have their own version of this, but it's all the same.

If you are sampling your beer before you have passed a 'window of greeness" which my experience is about 3-6 weeks in the bottle, then you are more than likely just experiencing an "off flavor" due to the presence of those byproducts (that's what we mean when we say the beer is "green" it's still young and unconditioned.) but once the process is done, over 90% of the time the flavors/smells are gone.

Of the remaining 10%, half of those may still be salvageable through the long time storage that I mention in the Never dump your beer!!! Patience IS a virtue!!! Time heals all things, even beer:

And the remaining 50% of the last 10% are where these tables and lists come into play. To understand what you did wrong, so you can avoid it in the future.

Long story short....I betcha that smell/flavor will be long gone when the beer is carbed and conditioned.

In other words, relax, your beer will be just fine, like 99.5%.

You can find more info on that in here;

Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning.

Just remember it will not be the same beer it is now, and you shouldn't stress what you are tasting right now.

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Old 07-01-2010, 12:21 PM   #13
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Thank you Revvey, I will just put them in the cellar and wait it out. I know I am an unpatient person when it comes to some things.

I will relax and have a homebrew!

MrLucky13

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Old 04-13-2012, 04:04 PM   #14
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So I was reading a thread that mentioned a corn flavor and did some reading which lead me to this thread. I understand the cause of it and whatnot...

When I was brewing last weekend, I noticed my boiling wort had a corn aroma to it. It was sort of sweet. And I actually found it pleasant. When I tasted my hydrometer sample, the wort tasted sweet, but not like corn. It was really just the aroma.

I'm not at all worried - I know fermentation and conditioning will change it. But I'm curious - has anyone else noticed a corn aroma during the boil and actually kind of enjoyed it? Or is it just me?

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Old 04-13-2012, 04:43 PM   #15
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I notice it, but I use 20 to 30% corn in my recipes.

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Old 04-13-2012, 08:48 PM   #16
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Mr Lucky 13:

DMS or the corny aroma and flavor is considered a characteristic of a cream ale. So some DMS character in your beer is fine unless you find it objectionable.

DMS comes from a compound in barley malt. It exists as free DMS, formed in malt kilning, and as a precursor referred to as DMSP. DMSP, which is not corny, is coverted to DMS by heat. During the boil, DMS is formed and boils off. However, the malt has lots of DMSP so a longer boil can be helpful, but there will always be some DMSP and DMS remaining in the wort. One key step in controlling finished DMS levels in the wort and resulting beer is to cool your wort as fast as possible. Wort that sits hot after the boil will continue to generate DMS that does not boil off. Thus, the DMS concentration in the wort increases as hot wort slowly cools. Faster cooling such as with an emersion chiller or plate chiller will help reduce the amount of DMS in the wort and final beer. Reducing the time the wort sits above 150 F by 10 - 15 minutes can make a difference.

Thanks. I hope this helps.

Dr Malt

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Old 05-25-2012, 04:53 PM   #17
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Bumping this old thread - I'm not positive, but I think the off-flavor that has been in a few of my beers is DMS. I've been doing 60 min. boils, and both beers with the flavor have been lighter (hefeweizen and belgian blond using belg. pils malt). It's not disgusting, but also doesn't really remind me much of creamed corn or vegetal flavors...it's just weird. I'm upping my boils to 90 min. to see if that gets rid of it, but for the beers in the bottle already, will the DMS age out after a couple months or so?

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Old 05-25-2012, 05:14 PM   #18
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If you're using Pilsner malt, 90 minute boils to eliminate DMS are the norm.

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Old 05-25-2012, 06:00 PM   #19
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What if you're not?

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Old 05-25-2012, 08:48 PM   #20
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If there's no Pils, or a low % of the grist, then 60 minutes is totally fine, as long as you have a good rolling boil and don't put a lid on it.

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