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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Why you should never get lazy
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Old 02-11-2008, 02:27 PM   #1
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Default Why you should never get lazy

I have a tendency to over simplify things. At least that is my excuse for being lazy

Over my last, I dunno, 20 beers or so, I have used between 10-12 lbs of grain and instead of calculating my exact mash thickness, I always just went with 3.5 gallons. That put me between 1.2 and 1.4 quarts per pound of grain. Well, I decided that I had too much high alc beer laying around and wanted to brew something a little more 'drinkable'. This batch of beer had only an eight pound grain bill. Well, in my infinite wisdom, I didn't really think about it and just went through the motions and added my grain to 3.5 gallons of water. Which comes out to 1.75 quarts per pound. Woops. By the time I realized it I was already mashing.

And that, boys and girls is why you should never get lazy.

Didn't really matter though. I still ended up with 74% efficiency and she is bubbling away as we speak.

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Old 02-11-2008, 02:32 PM   #2
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its hard not too be lazy when you have a computer program doing all the calculations for you

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Old 02-11-2008, 02:33 PM   #3
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hm, yeah, I can't fathom doing a from-scratch recipe without something like ProMash. Glad it worked out for you, but...lazy or no, you'll be sorry when you screw up a batch because you didn't sufficiently plan ahead.

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Old 02-11-2008, 03:09 PM   #4
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I've never really used a program. I use Qbrew to calculate my gravities and IBU's but other than that, there is no need for anything else. Calculating mash thickness is very easy if you actually do it.

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Old 02-11-2008, 03:12 PM   #5
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My point was that when you use something like ProMash, you tend to have a better handle on the global situation---like a checklist of sorts---and you tend to miss stuff less often. I'm not saying you need ProMash to calculate your mash thickness, but since it's part of your mash design process, you would be forced to acknowledge it and thus make sure you've remembered to figure it out.

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.planned:
•Scottish 80/- •Sweet Stout •Roggenbier
.primary | bright:
98: Moss Hollow Soured '09 72: Oude Kriek 99: B-Weisse 102: Brett'd BDSA 104: Feat of Strength Helles Bock 105: Merkin Brown
.on tap | kegged:
XX: Moss Hollow Springs Sparkling Water 95: Gott Mit Uns German Pils 91b: Brown Willie's Oaked Abbey Ale 103: Merkin Stout
98: Yorkshire Special 100: Maple Porter 89: Cidre Saison 101: Steffiweizen '09 (#3)
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Old 02-11-2008, 03:18 PM   #6
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Regardful of your opinion there EVAN!, It can be calculated by hand.

I am sure, however, that the program pays for itself thousands of times over.

I myself have only done BYO AG recipes thus far, and the amounts are provided.

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Old 02-11-2008, 03:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon
Regardful of your opinion there EVAN!, It can be calculated by hand.
Pretty much everything can be calculated by hand, but if i were doing that, I'd also like to have myself a global checklist of stuff to deal with prior to brewing. But it doesn't take an especially lazy person to want to drop all of $20 on a program to save the time and effort. Given that the OP claims to be exceptionally lazy, I'm guessing a brewing program might be a perfect fit.
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.planned:
•Scottish 80/- •Sweet Stout •Roggenbier
.primary | bright:
98: Moss Hollow Soured '09 72: Oude Kriek 99: B-Weisse 102: Brett'd BDSA 104: Feat of Strength Helles Bock 105: Merkin Brown
.on tap | kegged:
XX: Moss Hollow Springs Sparkling Water 95: Gott Mit Uns German Pils 91b: Brown Willie's Oaked Abbey Ale 103: Merkin Stout
98: Yorkshire Special 100: Maple Porter 89: Cidre Saison 101: Steffiweizen '09 (#3)
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Old 02-11-2008, 03:27 PM   #8
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I think I have read recently that the grain is fully wetted with 1qt per lb and every thing else is just adding volume. Dont take my word for it though.

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Old 02-11-2008, 03:33 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killian
I think I have read recently that the grain is fully wetted with 1qt per lb and every thing else is just adding volume. Dont take my word for it though.
You may be fully wetted, but that doesn't mean that there isn't a difference. Thicker mashes tend to result in a less-fermentable wort, thinner mashes in a more-fermentable wort, all thinks being equal. So, you might end up with a slightly thinner beer than you planned on (the impact is less severe than had you mashed at a lower temperature, however).

1.7 qts/lb is thin, but I have heard of some mashes being closer to 2.0 qts/pound. IIRC, some decocted mashes are closer to the 2.0 ratio (I'll have to check in with Kaiser or one of the other decoction experts to confirm that, however).
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Old 02-11-2008, 04:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan!
My point was that when you use something like ProMash, you tend to have a better handle on the global situation---like a checklist of sorts---and you tend to miss stuff less often. I'm not saying you need ProMash to calculate your mash thickness, but since it's part of your mash design process, you would be forced to acknowledge it and thus make sure you've remembered to figure it out.
Good point. I see what you are saying now. I think I misunderstood your original post.

And FWIW, I am not exceptionally lazy. I just like to poke fun at myself when I do something stupid.
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