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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > What's the worst that could happen?
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Old 08-31-2012, 03:45 PM   #11
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Increasing the temp gradually during fermentation is just to encourage the highest possible attenuation, right? You forgo that process?

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Old 08-31-2012, 04:30 PM   #12
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Increasing the temp gradually during fermentation is just to encourage the highest possible attenuation, right? You forgo that process?
That's the idea. I personally wouldn't ferment at 75 degrees, though. I like to start my Belgians at ~64 and let them free climb to about 68. When the fermentation slows I'll add heat (in the winter) or move them to a warmer room to get them up to the low to mid 70s in order to make sure they get enough attenuation.
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Old 08-31-2012, 04:44 PM   #13
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Increasing the temp gradually during fermentation is just to encourage the highest possible attenuation, right? You forgo that process?
I don't think you mentioned the yeast strain but...
Belgium yeasties tend to do their worst (I mean best!) early on during the reproductive phase and at high temps. Some people like to extend this phase more so by under pitching. Keep in mind that these yeasties are like champagne yeast (they ferment quickly with high attenuation) so you should probably use some fermcap to keep from loosing too much beer in the blowoff even at low temperature (65F). That said, you don't have to do much to get these guys to fully attenuate other than feed them well. A highly fermentable wort will certainly do that.


I recently just fermented a wheat base for my fruit beers with WLP500 in my garage in the Texas heat (90F ambient). Hydro sample was very tropical as desired with no hint of jet fuel. Sitting in secondary on fruit right now. Should be a perfect panty dropper!
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Old 08-31-2012, 05:01 PM   #14
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@TheZymurgist - On the contrary: I said I cannot be discouraged. I can listen quite well. I am a bit confused as to lower mashing temp. The information I've read often uses the term "produces a dryer beer". Is that to say that is produces a more fermentable wort? In the case of a Belgian Strong a highly fermentable wort would be preferable, but a dry beer would not. I was hoping someone would touch on this, because many of the recipes I've looked through call for higher mash temps... but I thought lower would make more sense.
True, true. You did say that.

Like the others have said, you'll still end up with a sweet beer. It's a mix of the perceived sweetness from the yeast, and the fact that your OG is higher. There will still be residual sweetness, even with the higher attenuation of the Belgian yeast. If you mash too high, you'll be left with a thick, cloying syrup-of-a-beer. A lot of the mouth-feel in Belgian styles comes from the carbonation, as well. They should be moderately to highly carbonated.
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Old 08-31-2012, 05:20 PM   #15
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I edited the recipe to show the change in mash technique, as well as the yeast strain I intend to use (WLP500). Thanks so much for all of your input. These big Belgian beers are my passion and it is my goal in brewing to the be able to successfully reproduce them at home.

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Old 08-31-2012, 05:34 PM   #17
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After rereading the description for the Caramunich, I see what ya mean Yooper. Somewhere along the way I got it into my head that I should not use so much Pilsner either. Is there another grain I should consider cutting it with? ...or is there any reason that I should?

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Old 08-31-2012, 05:35 PM   #18
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After rereading the description for the Caramunich, I see what ya mean Yooper. Somewhere along the way I got it into my head that I should not use so much Pilsner either. Is there another grain I should consider cutting it with? ...or is there any reason that I should?
Replace it with pilsner. EDIT: some of it
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Old 09-01-2012, 01:14 AM   #19
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After rereading the description for the Caramunich, I see what ya mean Yooper. Somewhere along the way I got it into my head that I should not use so much Pilsner either. Is there another grain I should consider cutting it with? ...or is there any reason that I should?
All pilsner Belgians are awesome- so no need to cut the pilsner malt at all.

I'd probably cut the aromatic a bit, probably in half, as well. It's "intensely malty" by it's description, and even more than intensely malty in my tastebuds. The biscuit is likewise overpowering.

I've of the belief that "less is more" in many beers, so I'd suggest simplifiying this grainbill quite a bit. If not, at least reduce many of the specialty malts by half, and consider reducing some of the dark candi syrup as well.
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Old 09-04-2012, 07:36 PM   #20
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After modifying the recipe per your suggestions, Yooper, I'm down to 15 SRM. While I know that this is acceptable for the style, it's much lower than St. Bernardus's Abt 12. Special B malt can up my color in a hurry, but I'm quite cautious about using it in much quantity. Any other suggestions for bolstering the color?

While I know that the color is acceptable for the style, it is just on the lighter side of the range, where my tastes would prefer the darker side.

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