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Old 02-19-2006, 05:43 PM   #11
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70f at room temperture can also mean that the actual temperture of your wort can be as high as 5f higher than room temperture.

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Old 02-20-2006, 05:21 AM   #12
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I graph out my temps with ambient and wort temps. I've seen a Safale dry yeast strain pick up 8 to 10 degrees from "fermentation" heat on a very alcoholic scottish ale.

I've actually read brewing practices in an island in Sweden, they pitch just a couple grains of dry yeast. Their theroy is that it takes longer for the colony to buildup, thus having a longer fermentation, and no "spike" that would cause significant fermentation heat (keeping temp consistant through fermentation), in turn reducing esters. My standards are against such practices, but I just thought I would share that

IMHO 70 is too high for most yeast strains.

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70f at room temperture can also mean that the actual temperture of your wort can be as high as 5f higher than room temperture.
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Old 02-20-2006, 03:50 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digdan
I graph out my temps with ambient and wort temps. I've seen a Safale dry yeast strain pick up 8 to 10 degrees from "fermentation" heat on a very alcoholic scottish ale.

I've actually read brewing practices in an island in Sweden, they pitch just a couple grains of dry yeast. Their theroy is that it takes longer for the colony to buildup, thus having a longer fermentation, and no "spike" that would cause significant fermentation heat (keeping temp consistant through fermentation), in turn reducing esters. My standards are against such practices, but I just thought I would share that

IMHO 70 is too high for most yeast strains.
that seems kinda backwards. it seems like that would lead to a lot of under-attenuated beers. its an interesting logic, but i think maintaining stable temp.s on the low end of the spectrum, while pitching a decent amount of yeast results in the best finished product.
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Old 02-20-2006, 03:56 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boo boo
70f at room temperture can also mean that the actual temperture of your wort can be as high as 5f higher than room temperture.
I too keep my house around 70 degrees F this time of year. My last beer that was in ferment (heffeweizen) was at 68 degrees F. During the main primary ferment, the sticky thermometer was as high as 80 degrees F. As soon as the fermentation died back down, the sticky thermometer read 68 degrees F. I have yet to find a way to control the fermentation temp within +/- 5 degrees.
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Old 02-20-2006, 10:42 PM   #15
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My basement has a constant temperture for most of the year excepting part of the summer of 64f. I brew ales at this temperture and get 66f on my strip thermometer when fermenting and this time of the year can get 64f consistantly with 62f at secondary not unusual. I lager in a fridge with a controller so my lagers are on the go all year long.

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Old 02-21-2006, 10:59 PM   #16
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Just taking a shot here, but you don't let your wort cool for a long time before pitching your yeast do you?

I used to make that mistake and had all kinds of after-tastes. This was the motivation for my using a wort cooler to get the wort cooled quickly so the yeast can be pitched as soon as possible. As I understand it, the sooner the brewing yeast establishes it's colony the less the possibility of bacteria gaining ground.

Am I off-base here?

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Old 02-21-2006, 11:08 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrauLieber
Just taking a shot here, but you don't let your wort cool for a long time before pitching your yeast do you?

I used to make that mistake and had all kinds of after-tastes. This was the motivation for my using a wort cooler to get the wort cooled quickly so the yeast can be pitched as soon as possible. As I understand it, the sooner the brewing yeast establishes it's colony the less the possibility of bacteria gaining ground.

Am I off-base here?
fast cooling mostly eilminates off flavors associated with DMS (cooked vegetable smell). ive never heard that yeast can prevent bacterial contamination. proper sanitation eliminates bacterial contamination. fast cooling eliminates some chance because a cooling pot with the lid off is ideal for bacteria or wild yeast.
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Old 02-22-2006, 12:11 AM   #18
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It is just that if you pitch your yeast in a timely fashon (ASAP) you minumize the possibility of any airborne yeast or other foreign spoor from gaining a foothold in your wort and causing later problems with off flavors or spoilage

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Old 02-22-2006, 12:22 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boo boo
It is just that if you pitch your yeast in a timely fashon (ASAP) you minumize the possibility of any airborne yeast or other foreign spoor from gaining a foothold in your wort and causing later problems with off flavors or spoilage
'Zactly, sort like early yeast gets the worm, uhhh wort.
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