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Old 08-10-2007, 12:44 AM   #11
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I recommend the FlyGuy conversion ... PM will take a bit longer, and it is a bit cheaper, but the results are most clearly worth it..

I think of it like training wheels for AG



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Old 08-10-2007, 12:53 AM   #12
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My LHBS charges $5/lb for DME, but the grain prices are on par at $1/lb. and he'll crush them the night before I brew. My only PM I've done, was 5lbs of grain, and 2lbs of xtra light DME.
Now that I've got a turkey fryer and a wort chiller ordered, I'm going all-grain to cut my costs. if you're gonna PM, and can find a way to boil/cool a 7 gallon pot, AG is where its at.

plus its a lot more interesting to mash grain, than open a can of extract and pour.

*edited to fix a lot of typos as I enjoy a few too many irish reds)



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Old 08-13-2007, 04:52 PM   #13
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So after some additional research and the help from you guys I think I have a better understanding of what mashing is.

I am planning on building a tun today or tomorrow so I can make my next brew with a partial mash.

Some questions that I still have are...

1) What temperature should I keep my mash at. I have read different things, The Joy of HomeBrewing says to keep it at different temps for different times and some things are saying to just let it sit at 165ºF for 45 minutes. Also what is the best way of keep the temp constant, do you have to keep adding hot water to it or can you just let it go.

2) How do I calculate effiency and should I be worried about it. I plan on making the tun from the Wiki with the S/S braid. Along with that how do I know how much DME to add to bring up the SG to where I want it.

3) How do I batch sparge and how much water do I do it with. From my understanding I add 165º water to the lauder tun, let it sit for a few minutes and then drain it to my brew kettle.

4) How can I take a AG recipe and turn it into a PM recipe, or do I have to find a partial mash recipe. Also I am looking for a standard Hefe recipe that I can do.

Thank you again for helping me out.

EDIT: Also, should I get a beer program or are those mostly for AG brewers. Also, anyone have any good links for a step by step PM brew guide, most of the stuff I have found has been more of theory and the basics but not actual step by step stuff.

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Old 08-13-2007, 06:05 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrey
1) What temperature should I keep my mash at. I have read different things, The Joy of HomeBrewing says to keep it at different temps for different times and some things are saying to just let it sit at 165ºF for 45 minutes. Also what is the best way of keep the temp constant, do you have to keep adding hot water to it or can you just let it go.
It depends on the recipe. Typical mash temps are in the range 150-158F. The temperature affects the finished product because it affects how fermentable the wort you get from mashing will be. I don't have a lot of advice here, but it might not be a bad idea to just shoot for the middle of that range to start with, until you get a feel for your equipment and can accurately hit the right mash temp and be sure you can hold it steady. Be aware that you have to add water that is quite a bit hotter than your target mash temp because of the heat absorbed by the grains and mash tun. You also need to be using a good grain-to-water ratio, usually something like 1.25qt/lb. This is an area where brewing software is REALLY handy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrey
2) How do I calculate effiency and should I be worried about it. I plan on making the tun from the Wiki with the S/S braid. Along with that how do I know how much DME to add to bring up the SG to where I want it.
Do some searching for calculating efficiency if you wish, however I do not generally bother worrying about it when doing partial mashes. Since you are only getting part of your wort from mashing, your efficiency won't affect your OG as much as it would with all-grain. As far as how much DME to add, well, I would recommend following a pre-written partial mash recipe, or using brewing software if you want to formulate your own recipe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrey
3) How do I batch sparge and how much water do I do it with. From my understanding I add 165º water to the lauder tun, let it sit for a few minutes and then drain it to my brew kettle.
Here I would also recommend you refer to existing recipes and/or use brewing software.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrey
4) How can I take a AG recipe and turn it into a PM recipe, or do I have to find a partial mash recipe. Also I am looking for a standard Hefe recipe that I can do.
I would not recommend trying to make your own recipes until you are more familiar with the PM process... There are plenty of partial mash recipes out there to get you started (try the beertools.com recipe library). If you want to go making your own, the general idea (if starting with an AG recipe) is to replace some/most of the base malt with DME and use the partial mashing for the specialty grains and maybe some of the base malt - but this is made a whole lot easier with brewing software.

As far as a Hefeweizen recipe... I would suggest, based on my limited personal experience on the matter, that you not try a hefe as your first PM brew, if at all. I made two hefes using partial mash recipes, and was disappointed with both, and then switched to a much simpler pure extract recipe, with no PM, and it turned out a whole lot better. That's not to say you can't make a good hefe with PM (because I'm sure you can), but hefes are really pretty simple, and there are other styles that would probably benefit more from doing a partial mash with specialty grains and would thus probably be better to start with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrey
EDIT: Also, should I get a beer program or are those mostly for AG brewers. Also, anyone have any good links for a step by step PM brew guide, most of the stuff I have found has been more of theory and the basics but not actual step by step stuff.
I use the beersmith software and I find it to be a GREAT tool. There's a 21-day free trial, so it wouldn't be a bad idea to check out, and would probably help quite a bit with your current confusion.

As far as a step-by-step guide, well, I don't have any links for you at the moment, but here's a very brief run-down of what I do:
1) put grains into mash tun
2) measure out right amount of water (usually 1.25qt/lb) and heat to the right temperature (calculated with beersmith)
3) add to mash tun, stir, and cover, set a timer for an hour. It should have reached your target mash temp.
4) toward the end of the hour, if I'm getting impatient, I sometimes start pulling small samples of wort and testing with iodine to see if the starches have finished converting to sugars. Some people say "don't bother", but I like being sure.
5) near the end of the hour, measure out your sparge water and heat to the correct temperature (again, I calculate with beersmith)
6) drain some of the wort from the mash tun, pour it back into the top - repeat until it pours relatively clear/free of sediment.
6) open the valve on mash tun, drain all the liquid into the brew kettle.
7) close valve and add sparge water. Let it sit for about 10 mins.
8) open the valve and drain into the brew kettle again.

Now, you've got some wort in your brew kettle, and you just continue on with the rest of your brewing process as you would with extract brewing - add some more water if needed, add extract, etc.

*edit* I did a short writeup of my first partial mash a few months ago, which you might find interesting:
http://eegeek.net/content/view/72/39/
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Old 08-15-2007, 12:40 PM   #15
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So this isn't exactly on topic for the thread but it is my thread so I am going to do what I want with it :P

So I am decided on brewing a extract Hefe and the only night we have to brew is tonight. Problem is I haven't made a starter for the liquid yeast (nor have I even used liquid yeast before)

What are my options for the brew night. We really want to brew tonight.

How would it work if I started the starter right when I got home which would give me about 4 hours till I actually pitched the yeast. Would this be enough time to at least get the yeast hydrated and give them a little oxygen and sugar to get started.

How would it work if I just pitched the liquid yeast directly into my wort. Would I be screwing myself or just increasing the lag time.

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Old 08-15-2007, 12:52 PM   #16
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I wouldn't bother with a starter, if you only have 4 hours. I'd go ahead and pitch it directly. You will probably have a long lag time, but that's the only problem.

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Old 08-15-2007, 01:10 PM   #17
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Go ahead and just pitch it. Just be sure to aerate the heck out of your wort first. Underpitching a hefe might lead to attenuation problems, but probably not if you aerate well. It might also produce more fruity, banana-like esters and spicey notes, but that would be fine in this style of beer.

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Old 08-15-2007, 01:23 PM   #18
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What we did last time was to use the spray hose on the sink to fill the carboy up to the 5 gal limit which made the whole thing aerated as hell.

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Old 08-16-2007, 02:36 AM   #19
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If you dont have time to make a starter, just boil a couple cups of water, let it cool in the fridge, then rehydrate your yeast in that before you boil. By the time your wort is cool and ready for the yeast,

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Old 08-16-2007, 03:37 AM   #20
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Alright, just brewed the Hefe,

The recipe called for 6.5 pounds of LME. I changed it to 7 pounds DME since all the last brews have been a little weak on flavor and ABV.

After brewing we took a SG reading and got 1.032 (oh noes)

But we aerated the crap out of the wort. Will that affect the reading?



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