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Old 01-18-2010, 03:47 PM   #1
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Default What do we mean by BODY?

Hey guys/gals,

There have been some replies on another thread (paint_it_blacks) ESB thread and I have sort of taken the thread in a different direction so I thought I would post it as a new topic.

One of my current life obsessions is to brew the perfect ESB and I think Fullers hits the mark. One of the difficulties in making the clone is having the beer retain some sweet taste after all is said and done. I have seen things from corn sugar, mashed maize, carmelized sugar, etc etc. But all these seem to impart is a higher OG and of course a hotter brew but not necessarily a sweeter brew.

So I have been reading about mashing and see that you can increase the body if you mash at higher temps, like 158 instead of 154... and according to wiki brewing:

A high temperature conversion of 155-158 F will result in less starch conversion leaving a beer with more unfermentable dextrines. This will create a beer with a full body and flavor.

So, the question is will those unfermentable dextrines be sweet? Does body, thin or full have anything to do with sweetness?

Thanks for any insight!

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Old 01-18-2010, 04:02 PM   #2
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Higher mash temps give more fermentables leaving the beer drier, lower mash temps give more unfermenatables leaving the beer sweeter and at a lower ABV.
Think more crisp vs sweet. Sweet will taste "heavier or thicker" than dry.

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Old 01-18-2010, 04:10 PM   #3
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Don't you mean the opposite? Low temperatures give more fermentables, high less, no?

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The temperature of mash steps, particularly the main sugar conversion (called the saccrification step) can have a significant effect on the character of the beer. Lower temperature conversion - around 148-152 F will take longer but will produce a more complete conversion of complex starches to sugars resulting in more fermentation and a clean, lighter tasting beer. A high temperature conversion of 155-158 F will result in less starch conversion leaving a beer with more unfermentable dextrines. This will create a beer with a full body and flavor. Middle mash temperatures (153-156) will result in medium bodied beers.

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Old 01-18-2010, 04:12 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IrregularPulse View Post
Higher mash temps give more fermentables leaving the beer drier, lower mash temps give more unfermenatables leaving the beer sweeter and at a lower ABV.
Think more crisp vs sweet. Sweet will taste "heavier or thicker" than dry.
That's backwards. Higher mash temps yield a less fermentable wort, lower mash temps yield a more fermentable wort. The unfermentable sugars have very little sweetness to them so they add body but not much sweetness. The sweetest sugars are the simplest ones (i.e. the fermentable ones).
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Old 01-18-2010, 04:17 PM   #5
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That is backwards...

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Old 01-18-2010, 04:30 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle View Post
. The unfermentable sugars have very little sweetness to them so they add body but not much sweetness.
There ya go, that's the crux of the situation, so if by more body we don't mean 'sweet' what do we mean? What makes body? Complexity? Clarity? If not dry then... Wet ;p but not sweet?

I know all beer is a balance between malt and hops the sweet and the bitter, but even this isn't simply clear cut because some high gravity beers suck the bitter right out of a ton of hops. So it must have to do with the body.
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Old 01-18-2010, 04:35 PM   #7
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yes sorry I was backwards. Typing before thinking.

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Old 01-18-2010, 04:51 PM   #8
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My question is "body" over "mouthfeel" and are they the same? My porter turned out sweet(not dry) to the taste but still seemed a little thin. It was a little under-carbonated and seemed a little thin in consistency. I mashed at 154°.
Taste is great but is there a link between sweet/dryness and carbonation when it comes to body or mouthfeel? Am I even making sense?

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Old 01-18-2010, 05:03 PM   #9
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Mouthfeel and Body are hard to describe and differentiate. For more mouthfeel you can use flaked wheat or oats, I forget which.

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Old 01-18-2010, 05:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IrregularPulse View Post
Mouthfeel and Body are hard to describe and differentiate. For more mouthfeel you can use flaked wheat or oats, I forget which.
Oats.
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