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-   -   Trying to get my head around the allgrain thing.... (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/trying-get-my-head-around-allgrain-thing-10822/)

Axeman 07-03-2006 12:49 AM

Trying to get my head around the allgrain thing....
 
I'm new to this forum and have done four extract batches, so I guess I'm new to homebrewing also.

A few friends and I are going to a give allgrain brewing a try in a few weeks. They have the large kettles and propane burner.

Is there a way to do a "concentrated" allgrain 5 gal batch? In other words, use more grain and add water to the wort as you would an extract batch?

The reason behind this is I live in an apartment (small stove, smallish pot) and I've got a real itch to start doing allgrain batches.

Any tips or advice would be mucho appreciated.

RichBrewer 07-03-2006 01:04 AM

Take a look at my Mini Mash thread
 
I'm sure everyone is getting tired of me talking about this but this is a way to do mashing without needing a lot of equipment and time.
Take a look at these threads and by all means let me know if you have questions.
:tank:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/mini-mash-system-extract-brewers-8805/

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/mini-mash-brew-session-10214/

Axeman 07-03-2006 01:10 AM

Thanks for the input Rich!

Gotta shoot to the store but I'll take a look at those threads a bit later.

Alex

perry 07-03-2006 03:27 PM

Axeman, for what it's worth, I did four batches of extract beers as well, and then jumped immediately into all-grain, and full-batch mashes. This was fifteen years ago. The leap to all-grain tripled the level of anxiety, wonder, doubt, exitement, and, ultimately, satisfaction for me.

The initial investment was a bit painful, especially for a starving college student, and I spent a lot of time improvising equipment, but after that first magical batch, I forgot about all that.

I, too, lived in an apartment then and I didn't want the burner to burn through the linoleum, so I just put two big foundation bricks on an end-table and put the burner on that. (Open the windows.) I still do this today.

If you think through the operation a few times before you start, you'll be fine, and you'll be blown away by the new control you'll have over your product...

Happiness to your mash,

jp

jcarson83 07-03-2006 03:38 PM

I wouldn't recommend using a propane burner inside (no offense). Accidents happen.

Axeman 07-03-2006 03:55 PM

Yea, I can't wait to start. One of the local supply places out near me has a club meeting once a month and most everyone there is doing allgrain.

I was blown away by the results they were getting.

My wife would never go for the indoor propane action though. Looks like I'll be doing allgrain batches at my friends place. Maybe we could do double batches somehow.

Axeman

perry 07-03-2006 04:12 PM

Yes. Accidents do happen! One was when I left the lighter on the bricks right beneath the burner! The explosion was... loud. I swear to god, I thought my wife had fired a gun.

Another, was when I was dragging a down sleeping bag (to insulate the mash kettle) past the hot burner... Nylon melts. Feathers fly.

Another was when I was done with the boil and moving the burner. I just grabbed the thing and burned the living s#*t out of my hand. Then I let go. The burner teetered on the edge of the bricks for a split second and then fell on my toes. I was wearing sandals.

There have been others. Should we devote a thread to this?

Darwin awards in brewing?

I do have a concrete floor...

p

RichBrewer 07-03-2006 05:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by perry
Axeman, for what it's worth, I did four batches of extract beers as well, and then jumped immediately into all-grain, and full-batch mashes. This was fifteen years ago. The leap to all-grain tripled the level of anxiety, wonder, doubt, exitement, and, ultimately, satisfaction for me.

The initial investment was a bit painful, especially for a starving college student, and I spent a lot of time improvising equipment, but after that first magical batch, I forgot about all that.

I, too, lived in an apartment then and I didn't want the burner to burn through the linoleum, so I just put two big foundation bricks on an end-table and put the burner on that. (Open the windows.) I still do this today.

If you think through the operation a few times before you start, you'll be fine, and you'll be blown away by the new control you'll have over your product...

Happiness to your mash,

jp

I think you would be better off doing partial mashes. A much smaller investment in time and money. It will suit your situation much better. Also, a propane burner inside is just not safe even with the windows open.

perry 07-04-2006 05:04 AM

Cheers back to ya, Rich, and it would certainly be a bummer if someone blew up, or burned down, their house.

For others reading this: I've been thinking about the whole brewing-in-doors thing and I have to make these acknowledgements.... first, I'm drawing up plans for a separate-from-house facility, because it really is a pain in the ass to try to make dinner in the kitchen when the wort chiller is hooked up to the sink and the brew kettle is between me, my wife, and the dinner table... second, I typically only brew five gallons at a time so my system is fairly portable... third, I have an immense, industrial kitchen range that runs off propane, and a wood-burning stove, so I guess open flame in the house is pretty ordinary here...

I've also tried brewing outside, but found that, even with a wind-screen, I lose a lot of heat and go through the propane like crazy just trying to keep a rolling boil. Inside, where the air is calm, I can get something like ten batches out of a five-gallon propane tank...

And, I must add... my wife is very tolerant of my weird hobbies and actually likes the smell when I add the hops...

Anyway, I mention this stuff only in an attempt to be helpful. I know that I'm still trying to get a handle on the big picture of small-time home-brewing, so these "conversations" are great!

Salud, p

Axeman 07-04-2006 05:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RichBrewer
I think you would be better off doing partial mashes. A much smaller investment in time and money. It will suit your situation much better. Also, a propane burner inside is just not safe even with the windows open.

Rich,

Do you have any partial mash recipes you could recommend?

Axeman


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