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Old 04-07-2012, 09:39 AM   #1
chuckstout
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Default Tripel

So im going to brew up this Tripped Ale this weekend, this will be my first recipe post, wanted to see if I should tweek it a little, ok here it is
5 gallon batch 68% eff. 75min boil

6lb Pilsner. 42.9%
5lb Pale Malt 35.7%
8oz Wheat. 3.6%
8oz Aromatic 3.6%
2lbs Invert Sugar. 14.3%

Northdown 8.5%alpha 1oz 75min
Mt. Hood 6%alpha 2oz 0 min

WLP500
EST. 1.079OG
EST. 33.4HBUS
EST. 5.0SRM

Thanks for takin a look, other hops in stock are merker, northern brewer, cascade, centenial, crystal and I think somethin else but cant remember, and i have a few other grains on hand to play with thanks again for any posts

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Old 04-07-2012, 01:10 PM   #2
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I think it looks fine, but if you want a critique, I believe that tripels have a very basic grain bill. I just made one that was 97% pilsner malt and 3% caravienne. The pilsner provides more of a grainy flavor that you can't get in pale malt. Because pilsner is so light it wont take much for specialty grains to overwhelm it. Aromatic is really good for this style though! With any pilsner malt as your base grain I would also boil for 90 min instead of 75 to prevent DMS. In mine I put table sugar into the carboy as fermentation slowed so it was sure to attenuate well. I think that the whole invert sugar thing is not necessary IMHO, but of course it won't hurt to use it. For hops I believe that noble hops are preferred, but if you want to give those a try...go for it. Post how it turns out!

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Old 04-07-2012, 01:18 PM   #3
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Most things look ok. For a Tripel, you are going to be at the lower end for your gravity, I would probably add another pound or so of Pilsner. Also, you might want to make the boil a little bit longer to get rid of the added DMS with the Pilsner malt, I usually will bump it up to a 90 minute boil. 75 minutes might be fine, I just personally have always gone 90, was just ingrained in me from some podcast early on. If you want to make it easier, I would just swap the pale malt for more pilsner as well, there really isn't much of a need for the pale.

Make a big starter for Tripels as well, you will only benefit with the bigger it is.

As far as your hops. I've never seen someone use that combination for a Tripel, but the Mt. Hood would likely be a great choice being a domestic version of Mt. Hood essentially. I've never used Northdown, so I have no clue what to comment on that.

Good luck!

Also, just to let you know. Be ready to wait for it to age. I brewed my tripel at the end of December/early January and it is still a little bit hot in alcohol, but with every couple weeks, it's getting better and better.

Edit: A bit late on my post, but after reading post above it reminded me. I also did what trevor did with adding my sugar in after fermentation starts to slow a little bit, this helps it ferment out much better by not straining the yeast on the sugar instead of the malt right off the bat. I think I waited 4 days before I added my sugar. And also, table sugar is just fine, no need for candi sugars or syrups, inert, etc.

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Old 04-07-2012, 01:19 PM   #4
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Looks pretty good. I prefer my Tripels very simple so I might consider dropping the wheat and the aromatic,but they are low enough that you can leave them. A good base tripel recipe is 80% Pilsner, 20% sugar. But anywhere in the 10-20% range for sugar works.

The IBU's might be a little high. Shoot for a BU:GU ratio of .38. Avoid the C hops. I prefer Saaz, Styrian Golding or Hallertau in my tripels. Never used Northdown so I am not familiar with the flavor profile.

Good luck. I love a good Tripel and always have a few different ones around.

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Old 04-07-2012, 09:26 PM   #5
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Don't mean to hijack, but when you add sugar after primary fermentation slows down, do you boil it in some water first, or does it go right in?

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Old 04-07-2012, 09:46 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingfinbar View Post
Don't mean to hijack, but when you add sugar after primary fermentation slows down, do you boil it in some water first, or does it go right in?
Boil it up in a small amount of water, cool, and dump it int fermenter. It is a good technique to gte the brew to finish slightly lower. I usually add after fermentation slows, about 4-5 days in.
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Old 04-07-2012, 11:27 PM   #7
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What beergolf said. Funny things happen when you introduce a whole bunch of nucleation sites (sugar crystals) to a solution with dissolved gas (beer).

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Old 04-08-2012, 12:41 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by absoluthamm View Post
Most things look ok. For a Tripel, you are going to be at the lower end for your gravity, I would probably add another pound or so of Pilsner.
Technically he is in the lower half of gravity range for tripels, but he's almost exactly in the middle. The BJCP standard says 1.075-1.085.
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Old 04-08-2012, 12:50 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingfinbar View Post
Don't mean to hijack, but when you add sugar after primary fermentation slows down, do you boil it in some water first, or does it go right in?
At first I tried boiling it in water then cooling it down, but it turned into a wet 2.5 lb brick of sugar. I could have added more water to dilute it into more of a syrup, but I had the fear that it would dilute my beer as well. I just added it dry, half at a time, slowly. It did not rocket out as I expected, but it did crawl up my blow off tube. When it settled and I added the second half.
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Old 04-08-2012, 01:24 AM   #10
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Looks fine.

Mash low (148 - 150 F), and long.

Cut the Mt. Hood at least in half.

Ferment warm, about 75 F.

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