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Old 03-14-2013, 06:14 AM   #1
srpratt
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Default Tried all grain...but too much sediment?

Hey all. First time all grain brewer...but I need help diagnosing my pitfall.

Tried a 90 minute Dogfish Imperial IPA recipe. About 18 pounds of grain total that I put in a large grain bag. Mashed at 160 in a cooler. Spargged at 172. When I poured the wort into my kettle from the cooler, I didn't filter because I had a grain bag. Added hops, did the 90 minute boil. Lost .5 gallons or so in the boil. No problem...great SG readings.

Here is where it got weird. After primary fermentation, I could only transfer only 3 gallons of the 4.5 gallons because the bottom 1 1.5 gallons was nothing but sludge. Why was there do much? Do I need to filter? I thought that is what the grain bag does? Where did the sludge come from and how do I avoid it?

Thanks for reading.

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Old 03-14-2013, 06:31 AM   #2
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It's partly what you're asking and partly that you didn't use enough water. One big thing could be whether or not you poured the entire contents of the boil kettle into your fermenter.

If you want 5 gallons at bottling, then you need 5.5ish gallons into the primary and about 6 gallons of boiling wort at the end of the boil. These are all general numbers and will vary by batch and technique. A typical starting boil volume will be 6.5 to 7.5 gallons depending on time and your evaporation conditions. (I do 90 minute boils and start with about 7.5 gallons and end up with 5.5 into the fermenter)

So, if you did throw the entire contents post boil and cooling into your fermenter, then you had a bunch of hops and all the trub in there. Since you said it's a 90 minute IPA, you added a lot of hops.

To remedy this, you can filter or transfer in a method that won't put all this gunk into the fermenter. A colander with a large muslin bag will remove a majority of the trub and hops. A dip tube along with whirlpooling your cooled wort will help to minimize trub and hops getting into the fermenter.

Hope this helps.

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Old 03-14-2013, 07:51 AM   #3
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+1

You'll get quite a bit more protein break material with all grain. Extract had already been boiled once, so you don't get as much.

was 160°F the recommended mash temperature?

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Old 03-14-2013, 03:59 PM   #4
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Chilling and whirl pooling will help immensely...
Brew normally (use a paint strainer or similar for your hops).
Chill normally.
If you are using an immersion chiller, pull it (and anything else still in the BK), use your sanitized spoon to whirl the wort into a fast whirlpool, then cover the pot and let it set for 15 or 20 minutes.
Without disturbing the wort, carefully drain from the side of the kettle, staying off the bottom.
As you get the level down, you will begin to see the trub at the bottom.
Carefully drain as much as you can without sucking up any of the trub.
You just whirl pooled.

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Old 03-14-2013, 06:43 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kylevester View Post
It's partly what you're asking and partly that you didn't use enough water. One big thing could be whether or not you poured the entire contents of the boil kettle into your fermenter.

If you want 5 gallons at bottling, then you need 5.5ish gallons into the primary and about 6 gallons of boiling wort at the end of the boil. These are all general numbers and will vary by batch and technique. A typical starting boil volume will be 6.5 to 7.5 gallons depending on time and your evaporation conditions. (I do 90 minute boils and start with about 7.5 gallons and end up with 5.5 into the fermenter)

So, if you did throw the entire contents post boil and cooling into your fermenter, then you had a bunch of hops and all the trub in there. Since you said it's a 90 minute IPA, you added a lot of hops.

To remedy this, you can filter or transfer in a method that won't put all this gunk into the fermenter. A colander with a large muslin bag will remove a majority of the trub and hops. A dip tube along with whirlpooling your cooled wort will help to minimize trub and hops getting into the fermenter.

Hope this helps.
Yup! Just make sure to scale any recipes to 6g or whatever volume you intend to have remaining at the end of boil.
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:20 AM   #6
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Mashing at 160 is gonna give you a mighty malty ipa if you didn't destroy all the enzymes. What kind of grain bag did you use? The one that looks like a sock that you get from the lhbs or a paint strainer bag type?

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Old 03-15-2013, 05:59 AM   #7
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I used a grain bag from the LHBS. Small holes but enough for grub to get through. The mash was at 150, I had to check my notes. So malt was high as I was going for a close to 10% ABV.

I agree on using more water...which means I need a larger kettle. And I will try the whirlpool cool method.

Also my cooler lacks a spout so I use the awkward pour a large hot cooler method. It's heavy but helps me on my deadlift max . Do some folks leave the first gallon of mash out because it doesn't run clear? I have seen that done...even though I forgot the technical term for it. Seems like you reduce Reuben significantly they way but also lose flavor?

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Old 03-15-2013, 06:02 AM   #8
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Also... I don't want to remove hops when filtering into my primary, right? Wouldn't that remove some of the flavor that I want to develop?

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Old 03-15-2013, 08:52 PM   #9
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Once your boil is done and chilled those hops are spent. All they will do is add to the trub in the bottom of your fermenter. You might want to consider putting a valve in the bottom of your cooler so you can drain off some of the liquid into a container and pour it back into the top of the cooler until you get clear runnings. I would atleast get a bag that is finer like a paint strainer bag that will keep more if the finer stuff in it.

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Old 03-16-2013, 02:02 AM   #10
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No one has mentioned it so i will.

Adding findings like Irish moss or whirlfloc at 10 minutes will also help all the proteins and hops coagulate and clump to the bottom

Whirlpooling works well, but my advice is after the stir and wait, drain the kettle slowly because a strong siphon will actually generate a large enough force to suction from the large pile of junk in the middle of the pot.

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