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-   -   Thinking (again) about BIAB (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/thinking-again-about-biab-188566/)

Burgs 07-29-2010 06:22 PM

Thinking (again) about BIAB
 
It's been a few months and a lot of research since the first time I learned about this method & I'm wondering if I was over-complicating it before... I'm wondering if this will work:

I have an 8 gallon kettle with ball valve from Morebeer, they're kinda short and stocky so right off the bat - if anyone knows of a nylon grain bag that will fit around the rim of this kettle, can you let me know?

1. Heat 6 gallons to strike temp w/ bag in the kettle
2. Add grains, stir, cover

*might possible insulate my kettle a bit with towels, etc. at this point... but I know from recent experiments that it does hold temp fairly well

3. When mash is complete, fire up burner to mash out temp
4. When mash out is done, place grain bag in colander
5. Use the ball valve to grab some additional liquid to pour over grains
6. Dump spent grains and proceed with boil as usual

I'm thinking I either need to find a bag that I know won't hit the bottom when it's filled with grain or invest in a false bottom... since I'm going to be direct fired.

Anyone see any other issues with this approach?

samc 07-29-2010 06:38 PM

You could buy some Voile nylon fabric and make your own BIAB bag to fit the kettle. I'd go with a false bottom or use a SS colander to keep bag off the bottom. The Voile bag I made for my MLT does an excellent job of giving me clear chunk free wort. Most of the pre-made bags I have bought were big but never quite the right size for my set up.-

Walker 07-29-2010 06:39 PM

I have never done BIAB, but the one issue I see is that you aren't using enough water in the process.

For the sake of an example, let's say that you are making a beer with 10lbs of grain. That 10 lbs of grain will absorb and retain about a gallon and a half of water. So, you'll have just 4.5 gallons at the end if you started with 6 gallons.

Also, when you say
Quote:

5. Use the ball valve to grab some additional liquid to pour over grains
Are you saying that you are going to use wort to rinse the grains? I don't know how well that will work because the wort will be laden with sugar already.

djt17 07-29-2010 06:40 PM

Thats pretty much what I do, but, I don't direct fire. If I wrap the kettle in an old sleeping bag, it holds temp enough. I purchased this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002EWZWAU/ref=oss_product it was enough material for 2 bags, the bags need to be large enough to fit your kettle inside. Also see: http://www.beersmith.com/blog/2009/04/14/brew-in-a-bag-biab-all-grain-beer-brewing/ for the process I use.

maida7 07-29-2010 06:43 PM

The way I have heard it described, you put all the water in the pot (both mash and sparge water). Then you soak the bag in the water at the mash temp for the length of the mash or whatever. Then your remove the bag let it drain into the pot and start the boil.

They recommend a 10 gallon pot size for making a 5 gallon batch.

Burgs 07-29-2010 07:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walker (Post 2188181)
I have never done BIAB, but the one issue I see is that you aren't using enough water in the process.

For the sake of an example, let's say that you are making a beer with 10lbs of grain. That 10 lbs of grain will absorb and retain about a gallon and a half of water. So, you'll have just 4.5 gallons at the end if you started with 6 gallons.

I said 6 gallons because that's my typical pre-boil volume for extract... I was afraid 7 gallons + grains would overflow my 8 gallon kettle :(

Sounds like I'm going to have some issues with kettle size. Thanks for the replies...

SumnerH 07-29-2010 07:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maida7 (Post 2188197)
The way I have heard it described, you put all the water in the pot (both mash and sparge water). Then you soak the bag in the water at the mash temp for the length of the mash or whatever. Then your remove the bag let it drain into the pot and start the boil.

That's the Aussie no-sparge style--calliing it "both mash and sparge water" doesn't really make sense, as it's all mash water (without a sparge, there is no sparge water).

DeathBrewer's got a sticky describing the alternative, where you do sparge--if you're going to do that, you separate out mash and sparge water per usual.

torbanac 07-29-2010 07:09 PM

You could just experiment and make a batch that fits your kettle size. The largest volume will be the mash. I have 5 gallon pot and the mash is full to the brim with 5 or six pounds of grain doing 2.5 gallon batches. Once I pull and drain the bag there is plenty of head room for the boil. I also use a SS collander in the bottom of the pot to add heat for the mash out.

maida7 07-29-2010 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SumnerH (Post 2188237)
That's the Aussie no-sparge style--calliing it "both mash and sparge water" doesn't really make sense, as it's all mash water (without a sparge, there is no sparge water).

DeathBrewer's got a sticky describing the alternative, where you do sparge--if you're going to do that, you separate out mash and sparge water per usual.

I'm aware of all that. I was just trying to put it in terms that people already understand.

Burgs 07-29-2010 08:02 PM

Let me clarify - I am talking about Aussie-style, not DeathBrewer style (although I have read his method and I do like it).


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