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Old 06-27-2009, 11:52 PM   #11
hopsy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davesrose View Post
If you're using modified malts, IMO, differences between say 148 vs 152 get to be trivial. I like to do a step mash....I start off with "protein rest" 133 for thirty mins......then I step up to 153 for 30 mins. I've gotten more consistant effeciencies this way, but it's probably due to various inconsistencies with my thermometers and pH stabilization vs real enzyme activities.
i read somewhere
How to Brew - By John Palmer - The Protein Rest and Modification
that: "In fact, using a protein rest on fully modified malts tends to remove most of the body of a beer, leaving it thin and watery."
is this a trade off versus chill haze? not that im trying to hijack my own thread its just a question spawned by your rest regime. have you noticed any adverse effects in your body (i mean the body of the beer of course, sarcasm)


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Old 07-16-2009, 07:30 PM   #12
hopsy
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update:
so i read somewhere that beta-amylase doesnt get denatured until 160*. not sure if this is true or not. also found out that alpha-amylase needs to be activated in order for beta to work, thus the standard single mash temp of 152*, which is a comfortable area for both amylases's to work. so mashing in above 150* and letting it slide does actually work as long as you dont go above 160*. of course a lower temp requires a longer mash time for good efficiency.

but the real news is that my original hypothesis appears to be correct. i put all the info into BYO's brewing calculator and it said my final gravity should be 1.016. when i racked into my secondary a couple of days ago the gravity was 1.010! and its still fermenting. i suspect a final gravity of around 1.006 or maybe even lower. i will update when i bottle. so this goes to show that this type of low temp mash does work if you want to produce more alcohol, or even just a real dry beer. hopes this helps someone down the road.

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