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Old 01-26-2013, 08:50 PM   #11
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My stouts and porters usually go from meh to wow somewhere between 2 and 3 months in the bottle. They are slow to mature and when they do it seems to be like flipping a switch. JMHO
I hthought I had seen that type of post and info before,,.....thank you.....I will let my latest brew go for another month or so in bottle and hopefully that helps! Thanks!
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Old 01-26-2013, 08:51 PM   #12
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NO...I have not done anything with pH estimates or looking at that......maybe that is my issue......any advice, spreadsheets, etc is much appreciated!
Kind of surprised you got the lab report and didn't use it in a spreadsheet. There are several out there. EZwater and Brunwatter are popular.
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:56 AM   #13
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Thanks...I will look into that......I have played around with water additions in the past (Gypsum, chalk, etc.)...but will look at those for specifics on my next stout......

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Old 01-27-2013, 01:16 AM   #14
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Read,Read then Re-read this..

https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/water-knowledge

Then download the spreadsheet..
Its intimidating,for a beginner, but play around with it,you'll get the hag of it.
Its going to ask for..
Water report numbers
Grain used in "said" recipe.
Water amount to be used etc/etc.
I use it .. worth the time to learn.. Weeks for me
Good luck

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Old 01-27-2013, 02:52 PM   #15
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I know stouts and porters are similar but I'm also thinking the black patent may be a problem. With that amount I would think time would help mellow it a bit and you may enjoy it more, recipe seems good other than that much black patent. Personally with a stout I shoot for at least .5 lb roasted barley and like 4 oz black patent for color some times. Maybe mash a bit higher 155ish unless it's a dry stout then the 151 seems fine.

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Old 01-27-2013, 04:07 PM   #16
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That water could easily be a problem for dark grists like stout. The alkalinity may be insufficient to buffer the mash pH drop. But, this water has a lot a similarity to the water from the Wicklow Mountains that Dublin's Guinness brewery uses to brew.

The Guinness method is to mash the base malt and the roast malt separately. Their local water IS NOT ideal for brewing a stout since it is relatively soft and non-alkaline. The local water is well suited to mashing the pale base malts in their beer. They create the Guinness Flavor Extract using the separately mashed (steeped) roast malt bill to add the flavor and color that is the signature of their stout. GFE is known to be 'soured'. But I contend that it is probably just tart due to the acidity of the roast grains and the low alkalinity water they are steeped in.

The stout style may have originated in that Irish region, but its likely that it was originally brewed in areas with much higher water alkalinity. The areas to the north and west of Dublin have that type of water. Guinness just figured out how to do it with low alkalinity water. While this method can work, I still find there are better tasting dry stouts than Guinness. Using water with the proper alkalinity can produce a fuller body and roast flavors without having to resort to a high percentage of flaked barley and roasted grains.

I agree with an early post in this thread that the bittering level should be slightly lower in a stout. The roast character is another form of 'bitterness' that is used to balance the malt flavor. Therefore, a slight reduction in the BU/GU is OK for this style (not that the ratio is very valuable).

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Old 01-27-2013, 05:20 PM   #17
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So I downloaded spreadsheet Double-R recommended...and entered my information from my latest sweet stout and water profile (preliminarily......is that a word?).....I know I need to read up on the site to make sure I understand....anyway, ends up predicting a mash pH of 5.0.......well below the recommended 5.7

So I can add Chalk (CaCO3) to get it up to pH 5.7

Some more reading and understanding on my part is in order.....

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Old 01-27-2013, 05:35 PM   #18
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Actually I think I want to be in the 5.2-5.5 range right?? Not 5.7 for pH

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Old 01-27-2013, 06:01 PM   #19
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Actually I think I want to be in the 5.2-5.5 range right?? Not 5.7 for pH
I don't know that spread sheet so it is hard to tell. 5.4 - 5.6 at ROOM TEMPERATURE is kind of the target for home brewers. We don't want to ruin expensive probes at mash temperature. The mash pH will fall as the temperature rises. Without knowing the spreadsheet I don't know what mash temperature it is geared at. Since it recommends 5.7 we can 'ass' 'u' 'me' it is at room temperature though.

Pickling/slaked lime, calcium hydroxide, is the preferred method of adjusting your pH up though. Chalk doesn't dissolve well and you have to load up the mash with extra which makes in unpredictable and possibly affects beer flavor.
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Old 01-27-2013, 06:03 PM   #20
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Heya mabrungard....thank you for feedback. The information on your site is great and the spreadsheet VERY nice. Looks like my mash 5.0 pH definitely could be problem....stouts I have done have not been "smooth" more of a tart aftertaste which looks like the low pH of my mash due to water profile is the issue. Looks like I will need to add some chalk net time I brew a stout

Thanks all for feedback!

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