Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Stopping added ezymes added during fermentation

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-25-2005, 08:38 PM   #1
Denny's Evil Concoctions
Grande Megalomaniac
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Denny's Evil Concoctions's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: West Kelowna BC, Canada
Posts: 7,767
Liked 51 Times on 42 Posts

Default Stopping added ezymes added during fermentation

If amylase was added during fermentation to convert an incomplete starch conversion. How can it be stopped without boiling.

Once fermentation is complete can the temp be raised to 170 (alchol boil 173f) for a certain period then reduced to normal, then yeast repitched for bottling?

The amylase would have been working at 72F, so I'm guessing this would take a week to finish conversion.

Reason I'm asking is I thought I had no conversion due to my post here: Potential Gravity for Tapioca starch???

So I added some amylase to the fermenting beer. About 1.4 grams for 5 g. (.05 ounces)

__________________

I may not be an expert, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express........ 6 months ago.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/denn...9/#post1766281

http://groups.homebrewtalk.com/Tapro...ook_Repository


Last edited by Denny's Evil Concoctions; 11-25-2005 at 08:47 PM.
Denny's Evil Concoctions is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2005, 08:56 PM   #2
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,651
Liked 133 Times on 126 Posts

Default

Good question. One the one hand, once all of the starch has been converted the enzymes have nothing else to do. On the other, heating the ale enough to de-nature the enzyme might damage the flavor and drive off some of the alcohol. Enzymes are very specific in the activity. If I was faced with the decision, I'd just let it finish fermenting and not worry about it.

Where did you buy the enzymes. They might be handy to have around. Actually, I know from experience that they would be, I've just never tried to track any down.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-25-2005, 11:17 PM   #3
PeatReek
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Bay Area, California
Posts: 46
Default

I second D42's suggestion to just ride it out... in fact I sort of doubt that you'll get much of anything from adding enzymes in the primary; alpha amylase is really only very active between 155 and 165 F (Here's a nice chart that demonstrates all the various enzymes & their functional temperatures), and beta only active a bit below that. At primary fermentation temps, I doubt you'll get any breakdown at all, or just a few percent at best. If you're going to heat it now you might as well re-mash and re-pitch.

David_42: I actually found a bottle of beta amylase at either San Francisco Brewcract (in SF, CA) or Fermentation Frenzy (in Los Altos, down on the peninsula); I don't remember which. They both do mail order, but neither of them list enzymes in their online catalogues... you could try calling and asking if they'll ship you some, but I haven't found any locally or online, either. Try sfbrewcraft.com and fermentationfrenzy.com.

__________________
PeatReek is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-26-2005, 12:53 AM   #4
Denny's Evil Concoctions
Grande Megalomaniac
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Denny's Evil Concoctions's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: West Kelowna BC, Canada
Posts: 7,767
Liked 51 Times on 42 Posts

Default

Yeah, I know they are most active at those temps, but I've read that some breweries add them in the secondarys to lighten the body even further for dry lagers etc. It's supposed to take weeks at those temps.

I guess I'll just let it finish out. and see what happens.

Since this was post mash/boil I used Digetstive enzymes,

The protease should help reduce protien haze, amylase for the starches, the other tow enzyems don't have any effect on beer. 10 capsules equelled 1.4 grams of amylase, which I beleive is the recomended amount.

Finally got a hold of my garin supplier (Brewpub) and I should get my grains for my AG next week.

__________________

I may not be an expert, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express........ 6 months ago.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/denn...9/#post1766281

http://groups.homebrewtalk.com/Tapro...ook_Repository

Denny's Evil Concoctions is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-26-2005, 01:15 PM   #5
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Long Island
Posts: 4,643
Liked 99 Times on 93 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

I agree with everything said before, but would like to add that heating to 170 would surely kill the yeast, just adding to the problems.

-a.

__________________
ajf is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Added Yeast Too Soon? Stew Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 07-04-2009 01:51 AM
hop tea added to the keg? killian General Techniques 3 04-27-2009 05:55 PM
added some rum...? Delchronic Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 04-05-2009 10:23 PM
simple sugar added late in fermentation killian Recipes/Ingredients 10 03-01-2009 03:51 PM
so i added oak chips... Righlander Recipes/Ingredients 5 04-27-2008 12:30 AM