Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Step Mash Procedure?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-21-2009, 12:42 AM   #1
Khirsah17
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 165
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Step Mash Procedure?

Hello all,

I wanted to try a step mash for the first time and was wondering if there is anything wrong with this procedure. Let’s say I do a protein rest at 120F for 30 mins, then want to raise the mash temp up to 150F. I don't have a direct fire mash tun or anything, so I plan on adding the right amount of boiling water to do so. Will I be denaturing/killing off my enzymes by adding boiling water?

Thanks!

__________________
Khirsah17 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 01:54 AM   #2
ggoodman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Juneau Alaska
Posts: 166
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

depending on grain bill may be no point in the protein rest and if anything it could do harm. boiling water is also a no no.

__________________

Fly Casters Brewing

"Aint nothing better than Fishing and Brewing Beer"

ggoodman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 02:30 AM   #3
knowltonm
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Hudsonville, MI
Posts: 137
Default

I agree that a protein rest for most malts will do more harm than good, but I routinely add boiling water to the mash to raise temp. The heat gets transferred around pretty quickly when you dump it in there and stir well. Decoction boils are added back in at boiling to raise temp as well; same thing if you ask me.

__________________

Primary: 20 min IPA (14oz cascade/5gal), partigyle pale
Secondary: Mead
Bottled: Orange Cream Ale, Big Red Ale, RIS, American Stout, Nut Brown Ale, American Amber Ale, Brown Porter

knowltonm is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 03:16 AM   #4
Reno_eNVy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Reno_eNVy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Reno, Nevada
Posts: 6,221
Liked 195 Times on 164 Posts
Likes Given: 62

Default

I've never used a protein rest and my beers turn out fine, if not great. Just do the single rest

__________________
Primary: air and sadness =(

Kegged: Cascadian Dark Ale

Bottled: English Barleywine (brewed 9/26/09 -- bottled 5/5/10)


LET'S GO LA!
LA CAMPEONES!
PLAY FOR GLORY, THE GLORY LA!
Reno_eNVy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 03:31 AM   #5
climateboy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 460
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

Do a decoction mash. That's what I would do. It can improve the complexity of the flavor of the beer, too, and in some cases, like a Bavarian Wheat, it's part of the style.

__________________

"Mas vale bolo famoso que alcoholico anonimo."

Join DC Homebrewers


"Fermentation Without Representation"
(C)

climateboy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 01:40 PM   #6
Khirsah17
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 165
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I'm making a summer Kolsch, and the majority of the grain bill is pilsner malt. I've seen recipes that do protein rests and others that don't. Just figured I'd try it and see if it makes a difference.

Reading up on decoction mash, it seems like you bring a portion, even up to a third of the grain to boiling. If boiling destroys enzymes, it seems like that process would do a lot of damage.

While we're on the subject, is there any problem of using boiling water to raise the temp to 170F after the mash?

__________________
Khirsah17 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 02:00 PM   #7
SpanishCastleAle
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 4,384
Liked 29 Times on 29 Posts

Default

Nothing wrong with using boiling water to infuse but the mash temp will likely overshoot a little bit because it takes a little bit of time for the mash tun to absorb the heat and stabilize at the higher temp. The heat absorbed by mash tun comes from the mash itself, so when you first add the hot water the mash heats up to a certain temp...then the mash loses some of it's heat to the mash tun and the mash temp will drop a little. I usually add boiling water in steps and stir between each step.

In a decoction, most of the enzymes are dissolved in the liquid. When you pull the decoction you usually pull mostly grain (thick-mash decoction) and leave as much liquid behind as possible. Then when you add the decoction back to the mash, the enzymes that stayed behind in the main mash convert everything. The decoction used for a mash-out is usually a thin-mash decoction (mostly if not all liquid) but everything is converted at that point.

Also, if you do your step mash like in the op then you will want to make the first rest a fairly thick mash. It's gonna take quite a bit of water (even if it's boiling) to raise the mash temp from 120-ish to 150-ish and you don't want the mash to end up so thin that you don't have hardly any sparge water left.

__________________
Early brewers were primarily women, mostly because it was deemed a woman's job. Mesopotamian men, of some 3,800 years ago, were obviously complete assclowns and had yet to realize the pleasure of brewing beer.- Beer Advocate

Last edited by SpanishCastleAle; 05-21-2009 at 02:05 PM.
SpanishCastleAle is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 03:14 PM   #8
thedude123
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: MA
Posts: 607
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle View Post

In a decoction, most of the enzymes are dissolved in the liquid. When you pull the decoction you usually pull mostly grain (thick-mash decoction) and leave as much liquid behind as possible. Then when you add the decoction back to the mash, the enzymes that stayed behind in the main mash convert everything. The decoction used for a mash-out is usually a thin-mash decoction (mostly if not all liquid) but everything is converted at that point.
I am not sure what your talking about with the pulling of the grain. I have done a decoction mast a few times and I have never pulled any grain.
__________________

Merrimack Valley Homebrew Club

http://mvhbc.com/

Contact: president@mvhbc.com

thedude123 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 03:38 PM   #9
jkarp
Beer Herder
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jkarp's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Elizabeth, CO
Posts: 2,105
Liked 33 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Khirsah17 View Post
I wanted to try a step mash for the first time and was wondering if there is anything wrong with this procedure. Let’s say I do a protein rest at 120F for 30 mins, then want to raise the mash temp up to 150F. I don't have a direct fire mash tun or anything, so I plan on adding the right amount of boiling water to do so. Will I be denaturing/killing off my enzymes by adding boiling water?
I do step mashes all the time with simple water additions. Works great. One tip is to start with a very thick mash - say 1qt/lb for your protein rest - then you don't need to worry about the pH going all wonky from too thin a mash later on. 30 min is way too long for a protein rest though IMO. IF I do a protein rest, it's for 10-15 min, tops.

The enzymes are far tougher than you think. A few seconds of boiling water contact while stirring in won't hurt a bit.
__________________
jkarp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-21-2009, 03:43 PM   #10
menschmaschine
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Delaware
Posts: 3,278
Liked 31 Times on 26 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thedude123 View Post
I am not sure what your talking about with the pulling of the grain. I have done a decoction mast a few times and I have never pulled any grain.
There must be a misunderstanding. Decoction is pulling grain (mash), heating it to a certain saccharification temp., then boiling it and returning it to the main mash to raise the whole mash temp to the next rest temp.
__________________

END TRANSMISSION

menschmaschine is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
first 2 step mash DanVader All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 0 03-07-2009 11:41 AM
Mini Mash procedure question Grinder12000 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 09-01-2008 03:09 PM
Partial Mash vs. All Grain? - Quipment and procedure questions jacksonbrown All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 15 03-15-2008 01:32 PM
Partial Mash - Recipe and procedure question Uncle Argyle All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 04-26-2007 11:57 PM
When to step mash? Brew-boy All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 11 01-09-2007 10:18 AM