Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Sour Flavor Additive
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-11-2013, 01:56 AM   #1
cluckk
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cluckk's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 1,599
Liked 348 Times on 226 Posts
Likes Given: 47

Default Sour Flavor Additive

I occasionally make soured mash to add to batches of beer for several reasons. I would most often make a simple starter, sour it over a couple days and then pitch it into the kettle for flavor. However, I wanted something that would be more consistent, for experimentation, and that I could add either into the mash (for ph adjustment), to the boil kettle (for flavor). I also wanted to be able to add to the fermenter, primary or secondary, if I chose, while still knowing how much sourness I would get and without worrying about the antiseptic nature of the hops slowing down the process.

I started with a gallon starter of about f 1.044 gravity (1 pound of Pale DME to one gallon of water just to keep things simple).

2013-01-24-19.53.43.jpg

I cooled it to about 100 degrees, then transferred it into a small cooler that I keep for souring wort. I added a couple ounces of raw grain to this to inoculate with lactobacillus and then covered it with plastic wrap (directly on top of the liquid) to keep out oxygen.

2013-01-25-07.44.56.jpg

I let this sit for three days and opened it daily to check the temperature and add a small amount of boiling water to bring the temperature back up to around 85 to 95 as needed.

2013-01-25-07.44.48.jpg

Once it had soured nicely I canned the liquid in small pint mason jars. Though a gallon is eight pints, I only filled seven jars because my canner can process only seven jars at a time. You will notice that I used a water bath canner instead of a pressure canner. Do not do this with regular wort. Regular wort is not acidic enough and you can end up with something toxic! The Department of Agriculture guidelines for canned foods sets a threshold of 4.6 ph. Anything below this can be canned in a water bath canner. Anything above this needs pressure to hit the proper temperatures. My wort was well below 4.6 (thank you lactobacillus) so I opted for the easier method--since I don't own a pressure canner.

2013-01-27-17.00.44.jpg


I now have seven pints jars of soured wort that I can safely add at anytime in the process and because it was canned there is no need to boil or otherwise sanitize it.

2013-01-27-17.00.48.jpg

__________________

"So you say you just brewed your first batch of beer. Welcome to the obsession." --me, to every first time brewer I ever meet.

cluckk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2013, 02:16 AM   #2
bratrules
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: socal
Posts: 456
Liked 18 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Nice job!! Hey but how much sour flavor can you get from one pint for say a 5.5 gallon batch?

__________________

Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy. - Frank Sinatra

bratrules is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2013, 02:47 AM   #3
cluckk
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cluckk's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 1,599
Liked 348 Times on 226 Posts
Likes Given: 47

Default

I'm working out the specifics of how much to add at a time. I pitched a pint into a Foreign Extra Stout to test and am just starting to get some lacto character out of it. I found on one earlier experiment that a flavor that is almost undetectable in unfermented wort can be quite strong when finished and the sugars are taken out of the way, so I started small. I made pints, because I want to make some smaller batches to experiment with and found the small size best--they also store better. One other advantage, if I drop and break one, a pint is far easier to clean up than a quart. If I need to add more I can simply pitch two or more jars into a batch.

__________________

"So you say you just brewed your first batch of beer. Welcome to the obsession." --me, to every first time brewer I ever meet.

cluckk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2013, 02:49 AM   #4
cluckk
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cluckk's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 1,599
Liked 348 Times on 226 Posts
Likes Given: 47

Default

It will also depend on how strong the batch is. A batch at 5% ABV that finishes dry is going to need far less than a batch of 8% ABV that finishes sweet. If I find pints just don't cut it then next time I'll use larger jars and go bigger.

__________________

"So you say you just brewed your first batch of beer. Welcome to the obsession." --me, to every first time brewer I ever meet.

cluckk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2013, 04:08 AM   #5
bratrules
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: socal
Posts: 456
Liked 18 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Cool thanks for the info. I've been wanting to make a Gose for a while now and this like a good way of going about it.

__________________

Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy. - Frank Sinatra

bratrules is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
tart & sour flavor boost njporter Recipes/Ingredients 5 02-09-2013 11:37 PM
Flavor additive question Iceman6409 Recipes/Ingredients 1 05-08-2012 05:46 PM
When adding an additive (Rasberry flavor) Mike-H General Techniques 6 01-03-2007 07:01 PM
Flavor Additive Poll cdew4545 Extract Brewing 1 07-10-2006 12:21 AM